Loading…
This event has ended. View the official site or create your own event → Check it out
This event has ended. Create your own
Please note: the conference is in BUILDING 2 on the UC Bruce campus. 
Watch this space for information updates. 

DAILY FORECAST (care of Describing Things in Canberra):  

Wednesday Canberra weather: regardless of any thing Neil Finn may have said, you don’t really have your own personal weather bubble. You can easily test this by travelling from the Woden Valley to the northside on foggy morning. Or getting on a plane in December and flying to Helsinki.

So those of you who are in Canberra today will probably experience much the same weather as each other. Warm to hot and slighty sticky. The weather equivalent of spilling cocoa on your new trousers.

Chemical interventions such as deodorant, sunscreen, mosquito repellent and anti-histamines are strongly indicated. Consider long before you commit to opaque tights, however hairy your legs are. Once the sun is over the yard arm, applications of gin and tonic may be beneficial.

 

 

 
View analytic

Sign up or log in to bookmark your favorites and sync them to your phone or calendar.

Monday, November 28
 

8:30am

Exhibitions

Caren Florance (& Angela Gardner) 
Working Papers (jostles)
Exhibiting space: Building 2, Lower level A Foyer


These are large-scale reproductions of small process moments of Working Papers, an artists' book collaboration with poet/printmaker Angela Gardner. We are exploring the sense and nonsense of composition, the immersive space of creativity. She works with her own poetry, casting and gleaning, and I work with hand-set letterpress, re-arranging her words to make new strange castings. The small moments of play, experimentation and process are caught, copied, and thrown up and out to allow quick or slow contemplation. 

Laser-printed tyvek, 6 pieces, 841 x 1189mm ea. 


Jen Webb (poems), Paul Hetherington (poems), Andrew Melrose (music)
‘he sat weeping on the shore’: remembering those who mourn  (The Odyssey 5.82)
Exhibiting space: Room 2B2

In 2001, the Norwegian container vessel MV Tampa responded to a mayday call that led to the recovery of refugees, mostly Hazaras, seeking refuge in Australia. A period of international tension followed, with Captain Arne Rinnan insisting on landing the refugees on Australian soil, and the Australian government denying the request. This event is only one instance in a history of similar events; a history that is ongoing, with no let up in sight of the flows of desperate people. The objects in the installation seek to concretise the fragility of those seeking refuge; the poetry and other textual and sonic materials will attempt to re-imagine this event, and remember things that are forgotten in official representations of the global refugee crisis.

Mixed media: ship model, Preiser figures, eggshells, folded paper: 3D installation with sonic element, and handmade poetry collection for distribution 


Lorraine Webb and Jen Webb 
Letter and Line
Exhibiting space:  Upper level, 2B7, space outside room. 

These works are part of a larger collaboration between two sisters, one a painter and the other a poet. We are trying to find ways to work together within and across our forms: ways that are neither illustration nor ekphrasis. How does colour speak to word? What is the relationship between a line of poetry and a line of paint? Our first approach to this project is to break with some formal constraints: painting not on canvas but on odd-shaped objects; writing not lineated lyric poetry but prose poetry and fragments. Next is the openness that is a mark of most creative collaborations, a moving to and fro between images, ideas, conversations, essays into objects. We are concerned more with gestures than with the mark or the gaze, and with determining how, through the movement of eye and hand and conversation, we might make letter that speaks to line, line to letter. 

Mixed media; painting on timber shapes, handmade or altered string/s, poems. 4 pieces, variable size and shape; 420mm wide x 1080 long; 1430mm wide x c.1340mm; 1725mm long x 240mm (diagonal); 40mm wide x 820mm long; with 2 – 4 poems, A5-sized. 

 


Exhibitors
avatar for Caren Florance

Caren Florance

HDR student, University of Canberra
Caren Florance is a research student and sessional design tutor in the Faculty of Arts & Design at the University of Canberra, Australia. She often works under the imprint Ampersand Duck, and is an artist whose work focuses on the book and the printed word, using traditional letterpress and bookbinding processes along with more contemporary technologies. She also teaches at the ANU School of Art and is collected by national and... Read More →
PH

Paul Hetherington

Professor of Writing, University of Canberra
Paul Hetherington is Professor of Writing at the University of Canberra and Head of the International Poetry Studies Institute (IPSI) there. He has published ten full-length collections of poetry, including Burnt Umber (UWAP, 2016) and five poetry chapbooks, most recently Earth. His collection, Six Different Windows won the 2014 Western Australian Premier’s Book Awards (poetry) and he was a finalist in the 2014 international Aesthetica... Read More →
avatar for Andrew Melrose

Andrew Melrose

Professor of Writing, University of Winchester
Andrew Melrose is Professor of Writing for Children and Creative Writing at the University of Winchester, UK. He has over 160 film, fiction, nonfiction, research, songs, poems and other writing credits, including 15 films, 4 scholarly and 30 creative books. He is also the editor of the journal Write4Children and has written a number of books, articles and book chapters on various aspects of critical and creative writing and on child-centered... Read More →
avatar for Jen Webb

Jen Webb

Distinguished Professor of Creative Practice, University of Canberra
Jen Webb is Distinguished Professor of Creative Practice at the University of Canberra, and Director of the Centre for Creative and Cultural Research. Her work includes scholarly volumes Researching Creative Writing (Frontinus, 2015) and Art and Human Rights: Contemporary Asian Contexts (with Caroline Turner; Manchester UP, 2016), and poetry volumes Watching the World (with Paul Hetherington; Blemish Books, 2015) and Stolen Stories, Borrowed... Read More →



Monday November 28, 2016 8:30am - 6:00pm
Around Building 2

9:30am

AAWP Executive Meeting :: 20B3
Monday November 28, 2016 9:30am - 11:00am
20B3 Building 20, UC

9:30am

Registration & Morning Tea :: 2B2
Monday November 28, 2016 9:30am - 11:30am
2B2: Registration/Bookshop Building 2, UC

11:00am

Smoking ceremony and welcome to country
Monday November 28, 2016 11:00am - 11:30am
Outdoor ampitheatre Open green area outside Building 2

11:30am

Welcome and Keynote 1: Collaborating with the Dead: Authorised Theft in Translation as Re-Creation: 2B9
Does Ezra Pound's credo 'make it new' exalt authorised theft of past literary works? According to poet and translator Tony Barnstone, 'even the phrase "make it new" derives from the Chinese characters which the founder of the Shang Dynasty, King Tang (1617–1588 BCE), had inscribed in gold on his bathtub', and so the past is washed clean to be used today. According to Emerson, 'In every work of genius we recognise our own rejected thoughts: they come back to us with a certain alienated majesty'. Then is genius the ability to renew and redefine a certain past, make it relevant? In this light, translation of poetry will be closely examined. It is impossible to convey the emotions and allusions contained in a poem by translating it faithfully word for word. After all, what distinguishes poetry from prose is the use of language's metaphoric life force, as well as its use as a musical tool. Therefore, a translator of poetry can become the unwitting destroyer of poems or, alternately, a re-creator of new ones. Consequently, does literary history readjust itself with each effective translation? Is two-way authorised theft crucial in translation of poetry?

Moderators
PH

Paul Hetherington

Professor of Writing, University of Canberra
Paul Hetherington is Professor of Writing at the University of Canberra and Head of the International Poetry Studies Institute (IPSI) there. He has published ten full-length collections of poetry, including Burnt Umber (UWAP, 2016) and five poetry chapbooks, most recently Earth. His collection, Six Different Windows won the 2014 Western Australian Premier’s Book Awards (poetry) and he was a finalist in the 2014 international Aesthetica... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Sholeh Wolpé

Sholeh Wolpé

Writer
Sholeh Wolpé is an Iranian-born poet and literary translator. She is the recipient of the 2014 PEN/Heim, 2013 Midwest Book Award and 2010 Lois Roth Persian Translation prize. Wolpé's nine books include, Keeping Time with Blue Hyacinths, Rooftops of Tehran, Sin—Selected Poems of Forugh Farrokhzad, and The Forbidden: Poems from Iran and Its Exiles. Wolpé's modern translation of Conference of the... Read More →


Monday November 28, 2016 11:30am - 12:30pm
2B9: Lecture Theatre Building 2, UC

12:30pm

Lunch :: 2B Foyer
Monday November 28, 2016 12:30pm - 1:30pm
2B: Foyer Building 2, UC

1:30pm

Sociologies of Writing :: 2B11
Jen Webb: 

Poetry, Christophe Charle and the problem of literary sociology

Christophe Charle describes the “divorce between the symbolic occupation of writers and the real basis of their social location” as “the main problem of the sociology of literature”. Unlike other professional groups, he argues, writers need have nothing in common except a passion for writing. Charle’s perspective is that of the French social context of a century ago, but there are some parallels to the contemporary Anglophone context. In a recent investigation of contemporary poets in nine Anglophone nations, my co-investigators and I necessarily considered whether it is possible to produce sociological accounts of this community that is not a community, this field that is at best only a sub-field. Who or what constitutes a poet? Is there anything that can be understood in terms of field, in both the constitution of subject as poet, and their operations in the social space? In this paper I discuss the issues we needed to address, particularly the relationship between economic and symbolic identity, and between self-identification and the “judgment of posterity”, as well as the principles of legitimation that operate to attribute value to oral and written/ performance and publication modes of production.

Scott Brook: Narratives of social inertia in the City of Literature

Bourdieu’s references to social inertia has provided a compelling paradigm for exploring the motivations of early career literary writers. Through situating the field of literary production in relation to a broader understanding of the changing relationship between Higher Education and the labour market, it allows research not only to advance beyond both social normative (‘labour of love’) and economistic (‘bad gamblers’) interpretations of artists’ motivations, but also to develop a properly sociological account of non-pecuniary rewards (‘psychic income’) through attention to the conditions that dispose individuals to value them.
     In support of this approach, and in the spirit of the reflexive turn Bourdieu encouraged, this paper considers how narratives of social inertia are produced by the research relation. Drawing on interviews with graduate literary writers in Melbourne, a UNESCO recognised City of Literature, it describes the production of evidence of the social inertia effect in the context of the well-understood advocacy role of most arts sector research, the position-taking of emerging literary writers, as well as the implicit ‘consciousness raising’ agenda of social research.

Antonia Pont: 

Artistic Accompanying and Community Practice


This paper reports on a Melbourne poetry initiative, run across three separate events over six months, involving 18 makers, most of whom were poetry practitioners, two of whom were visual artists of different kinds. The project involved mobilising a practice of "accompanying" another maker in producing new works, (as a variation on the notion of collaboration). Whereas collaboration can bump into questions of 'theft', authorised or otherwise, this project placed emphasis on being in conversation adjacent to the making process, without necessarily making-together. Attempting to engage the listeners at the event differently, various techniques of facilitation were tested in order to smear the line between audience and reader.

Roanna Gonsalves:  

The politics of friendliness in the literary field

The mediatized and globalised literary field opens up numerous possibilities for the democratisation of writing while consequently and simultaneously restricting the resources available to writers to find publishers and to be legitimised in various ways. In attempting to understand how emerging writers create pathways to publication, this paper focusses on the stories of two writers with contrasting publication journeys, based on fieldwork conducted in India from 2011 to 2014. I suggest that in seeking out opportunities to get published, these writers engage in what I call ‘practices of friendliness’ that emerge out of the Bourdieusian sense of interest in disinterestedness that subtends all economies of symbolic goods. This paper is a preliminary attempt to begin to develop a cartography of friendliness, to map this ‘grammar of social capital’, to survey its hierarchical constructions, its entanglements, its politics. In doing so, it hopes to contribute to the discussion about the training of creative writing students in the academy.



Moderators
avatar for Michael Grenfell

Michael Grenfell

Scholar
Michael Grenfell has worked at universities in England, Scotland and Ireland and held Chair positions within each. He has an extensive research background on the work of the French social theorist Pierre Bourdieu, and has applied this approach to such areas as economics, art, music, education, translation and literature. He has been a visiting scholar at the École des Hautes Études and the Collège de France, Paris. He is on... Read More →

Speakers
SB

Scott Brook

Associate Professor, Writing, University of Canberra
Scott Brook is Associate Professor of Writing at the University of Canberra where he convenes and teaches 'Research and Practice' and 'Literature and Government'. He is also a member of the Centre for Creative and Cultural Research where he is working on two ARC Discovery Projects looking at creative vocations and creative arts graduates in Australia, China and the UK.
RG

Roanna Gonsalves

University of New South Wales
Roanna Gonsalves is an Indian Australian writer and academic. Her series of radio documentaries entitled On the tip of a billion tongues, (Earshot, ABC RN Nov-Dec 2015) is an acerbic socio-political portrayal of contemporary India through its multilingual writers. She received the Prime Minister’s Endeavour Award 2013, and is co-founder co-editor of Southern Crossings. She teaches in the Creative Writing and Media Studies streams at the... Read More →
AP

Antonia Pont

Senior Lecturer, Deakin University
Antonia Pont writes poetry, short fiction and nonfiction, and novel-length prose works. Her writing has appeared in Meanjin, Cordite, Antic Magazine, Newcastle Poetry Prize Anthology, Rabbit, TEXT, Gargouille, Axon, as well as international anthologies. She researches ontologies of creativity, practising theory and change, is Senior Lecturer in Writing & Literature at Deakin University... Read More →
avatar for Jen Webb

Jen Webb

Distinguished Professor of Creative Practice, University of Canberra
Jen Webb is Distinguished Professor of Creative Practice at the University of Canberra, and Director of the Centre for Creative and Cultural Research. Her work includes scholarly volumes Researching Creative Writing (Frontinus, 2015) and Art and Human Rights: Contemporary Asian Contexts (with Caroline Turner; Manchester UP, 2016), and poetry volumes Watching the World (with Paul Hetherington; Blemish Books, 2015) and Stolen Stories, Borrowed... Read More →


Monday November 28, 2016 1:30pm - 2:30pm
2B11 Building 2

1:30pm

Stolen Identities :: 2A12
Brenda Fitzpatrick: Stories to Change the World (Just a Little Bit Stolen)

Advocates have used stories of suffering and survival to bring about change in policy and practice to confront violations of law and human rights.  There is an essential, accompanying requirement that the telling must not constitute theft. Identities must be protected. Ownership must be respected. But undoubtedly, sharing stories ensures awareness of the humanity behind what legal and theoretical debates. The personal can influence the policy. Stories are powerful instruments for change. This writer sets out to show how that might be done.
      There has been a change in international norms regarding rape in war. After centuries of acceptance that rape in war was inevitable there is now recognition of it as a deliberate tactic of war. There has been accompanying rejection and international response. The conflicts in the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda – and the international criminal tribunals set up to deal with crimes in those arenas were instrumental in establishing tactical rape as a serious breach of international law, a war crime, an instrument of genocide and torture.
      In the United Nations, in the courts, in the public media and in academic debate, stories of victims and survivors played a part in effecting attitudinal change. Stories of indifference on the part of authorities were highlighted. The strength as well as the suffering of victims and survivors was told.
      Using these stories brings great responsibility – to avoid sensationalism, to protect and respect the owners of those stories. Used with respect they are powerful and can make a positive difference. 

Harriet Gaffney: Romancing Theft

This paper examines the legacy of Romanticism on Australian settlement.  It investigates how a public hungry for writing of all genres and schooled for centuries by the adventure tales of white heroes—“free”, as Patrick Brantlinger notes, “of the complexities of relations with white women”—came to believe in the authority of the theft of Aboriginal land, and to so casually disregard the violation of her people.
      Through close analysis of an account by the Victorian settler, Joseph Tice Gellibrand, this work seeks to unveil how word and action often belie one another, acting to legitimate what was in fact unlawful through what Foucault refers to as a “hazardous play of dominations”.
       Furthermore, I examine how the perception of legitimacy continues to operate in the contemporary Australian milieu, seeking to make clear through anecdotal evidence the connections between ideologies past and present, and to demonstrate how in this country (more perhaps than any other), the written word has everything to do with property, and ownership, and authority.
      In this way I conclude that it is through the written word, first and foremost, that we can help to bring about social change: through writing that seeks, as Jen Webb states, “to make things visible”, to “provide a platform” from which to disrupt the cultural orthodoxy and the phenomenology of colonialism and thus unsettle notions of settlement and sovereignty.  
      My work draws on Tim Fulford, Martin Green, Peter Kitson and Saree Makdisi’s explorations of British Romanticism; on the post-colonial discourse of Bill Ashcroft, Clare Bradford, Paul Carter and Stephen Muecke, and on Michel Serres exposition of the sensate realm of experience and the history of the Australian state of Victoria in an attempt to bring into being alternate narratives of place. 

Karen Gibson:  Re-Reading Jeannie Gunn and Laura Ingalls Wilder:  Racism, Myth-Building, and Reader Identification in Two “Pioneering” Narratives

Two books, both initially aimed primarily at juvenile audiences, have enjoyed immense popularity in their own countries of origin and around the world.  Yet, in recent years, both have received mixed reviews from critics regarding their portrayals of indigenous people.   Both authors reflect back on an earlier period of their own lives with nostalgia, a nostalgia that becomes entangled with early twentieth century myths of nation building and “settling” of “unoccupied” territories, resulting in often unfavorable representations of indigenous communities.  Despite these disparate readings by critics, both books continue to be used in educational settings and are often prominently displayed on library shelves.
      Drawing on post-colonial theories of children’s literature, this comparison of The Little Black Princess of the Never-Never (Australia; 1905) and Little House on the Prairie (U.S.A.; 1935) will focus on the books’ similarities, and the underlying messages they convey to young readers, in an attempt to understand their enduring popularity as well as to evaluate their potential value for a new generation of readers.  

Rosemary Sayer: Identity theft: The missing narrative identity of refugees and asylum seekers in Australia

More than 65 million people have been forcibly displaced worldwide; the highest number since the end of WWII. In his book  Across the seas – Australia’s response to refugees: a history (2015) Klaus Neumann describes the response to refugees and asylum seekers as “one of the twenty first century’s most controversial and seemingly intractable ethical, political and social issues …”  Much of the public discourse about refugees and asylum seekers in Australia is de-humanising, negative and politicised. Governments and media have often created untrue narratives by grouping all asylum seekers and refugees together and exploiting people’s anxieties about security, borders and terrorism. This has resulted in a theft of identity for many individual people from a refugee background and the development of a misleading collective identity.
      In this paper, I will explore how narrative identity can be re-discovered and developed by refugees through a collaborative process of working with a non-refugee narrator. In producing an alternative narrative and different view of the lives affected, I will also explore whether greater community engagement can be fostered at the same time as expanding the scholarship of education and human rights. As Kay Schaffer and Sidonie Smith posit in Human Rights and Narrated Lives (2004) “personal narratives expand audiences around the globe to be educated about human rights abuses”. Life stories can engage and influence readers to become more informed, reflective and active. I will discuss how this collaboration can be empowering for refugees to help them reclaim their stolen identities and dispel misleading narratives being disseminated about them.

 


Moderators
JC

Jen Crawford

University of Canberra
Dr Jen Crawford is an Assistant Professor of Writing within the Centre for Creative and Cultural Research at the University of Canberra. She has also taught in New Zealand and Singapore. Her most recent collections of poetry are Lichen Loves Stone (Tinfish Press, 2015), Koel (Cordite Books, 2016) and 5,6,7,8, co-authored with Owen Bullock, Monica Carroll and Shane Strange (Recent Work Press, 2016). 

Speakers
BF

Brenda Fitzpatrick

Dr Brenda Fitzpatrick is a writer with extensive experience in refugee camps and conflict zones. Working with humanitarian organisations she helped inform and challenge global policy makers and leaders to recognise the use of rape as a weapon and a tactic of war, a breach of international law, a violation of human rights, a war crime, a crime against humanity and genocide. She is the author of many papers, reports and the book, Tactical Rape in... Read More →
HG

Harriet Gaffney

Griffith University
Harriet Gaffney is a PhD candidate in the School of Humanities at Griffith University, with Honours and Masters degrees in Professional and Creative writing from Deakin University. Using fiction as methodology, her research seeks to unsettle notions of place and sovereignty in the post-colonial context.  In 2015 Harriet was awarded the Varuna Eric Dark Flagship Fellowship to further her work and was a finalist in the Melbourne Lord... Read More →
KG

Karen Gibson

Director, WORD Studio, St Lawrence University, NY
Karen Gibson is currently Director of the WORD Studio (writing center) at St. Lawrence University in Canton, NY. She previously taught for the State University of New York. Her publications include an article on American modernist, John Dos Passos, as well as a study of narrative technique in the short stories of Native American author, Maurice Kenny. Her research interests are currently centered on children’s literature and writing... Read More →
RS

Rosemary Sayer

Curtin University
Rosemary Sayer is a writer, former journalist and a business communications consultant. She is currently undertaking a PhD in life writing and human rights at Curtin University.  | Rosemary has written three non-fiction books. The biography of Sir Gordon Wu, chairman of Hopewell Holdings, The Man who Turned the Lights On, was published in 2006 and the biography of Trevor Eastwood, The CEO, the Chairman and the Board, was published in... Read More →


Monday November 28, 2016 1:30pm - 2:30pm
2A12 Building 2, UC

1:30pm

Poetry, Song and Place :: 2A4
Brentley Frazer: Aboriginal to Nowhere: Song Cycle of The Post Modern Dispossessed

In 1948, after many years living with the Wonguri-Mandjigai people, Ronald M. Berndt published an English language translation of a non sacred song of the Sand-fly Clan: the Song Cycle of The Moon-Bone. In 1977 Les Murray wrote his own version based on the Berndt translation The Buladelah-Taree Holiday Song Cycle, a white mans revision. This earned him both congratulations and consternation. Critics referred to this poem as a ‘respectful parody’; he had, after all, omitted the lyrical I, a big ask for someone who believes in spiritual dominion. 2016: I have authored a homosemantic emulation, retranslated Murray’s translation, transgressed his vision of city folk holidaying on grandma’s farm and responded with Aboriginal To Nowhere: Song Cycle of The Post Modern Dispossessed. Written in thirteen cycles this poem signals a contemporary poetry of dispossession and anti-sentiment, ventures into transliminal territory, explores those in-between places of perpetual generational change, hyperaware of incremental shifts. I have restored the lyrical I, unable to see myself as a collective, metaphorical evidence of ontological fractures in the definition of what it means to ‘be human’. Perhaps Murray is correct and modernist sensibilities are dominated by fragmentation, cynicism and a morbid depression. I certainly fit here, lost and broken and deeply distrustful of ‘the official story’. This is all I have, what of the world I have inherited from my forebears; fragments, pieces of nothing and empty alienation.

Owen Bullock:  Response mode: taking everything and the genre

This hybrid paper of creative and critical writing reflects on my explorations of poetry. I write in what I call ‘response mode’, which is a group of behaviours, beginning with impersonation, and open to understandings gained from other art forms. After studying the style and techniques of other poets, I move towards a mid-point between another poet’s voice and my own, effectively, a new hybrid voice. The engagement with some literary ancestors enables evolution to an expression more fully my own. Stealing the designations of genre ensures a continued experiment. The challenges and variety of voicings made possible by prose poetry and haibun are important. The haibun influences other new hybrid forms, which encompass found poetry and appropriate language in a way which is redolent of the times. We take from exhibitions, songs, film, poems, conversation. Poets eavesdrop; I do it on the bus. If there is stealing, it is on a spectrum, which includes intertext. My poems draw from Gerard Manley Hopkins, Yunna Moritz and Alan Loney, and from sculptor Cori Beardsley, who suggest to me new possibilities.

Andrew Melrose: Product/Protest Placement in popular culture: writing lyrical protest songs 

While watching Tarantino’s Django Unchained, I was given a flashback back to my early teenage years, when I first encountered Richie Havens singing ‘Freedom’ in the Woodstock movie. Here was the Django film, set in 1858, screened in 2016 and using a song recorded in 1968, and the legitimate theft of the song was used very effectively to enhance the film’s narrative. Nevertheless, while we are aware of ‘cynical’ product placement in movies, the trend for placing protest songs is an interesting ‘appropriation’, which I will address – especially in relation to my own interventions. Songwriting is the little sister in the writing world, arguably the most popular but least considered in critical terms. This paper is part of research into my forthcoming book, Writing Song Lyrics: a creative and critical approach (forthcoming, Palgrave, 2017).

Katrina Finlayson: This Story Has an Island in It: A Thief Weaves a Braided Essay

A bowerbird collects pieces of blue, arranging stolen objects to form meaning; a pattern leading the way home. So, too, this braided essay gathers pieces of writing and arranges them to form new meaning. I am a thief, stealing stories from the ghosts of place to weave through my own. A brief discussion of the braided essay form, and the creative writing process behind this braided essay, situates the creative work.

The braided essay draws on my travels to a tiny island in the Scottish Highlands called Eilean Munde. An older story weaves through mine, a story found through research into the history of dark treachery and bloodshed in the surrounding area of Glencoe. The final thread in the braid is a critical discussion, about place and about the ghosts which sigh through the long grasses of the Isle of the Dead. Excerpts from the braided essay will be presented.

 

 

Moderators
avatar for Paul Munden

Paul Munden

Postdoctoral Fellow (Poetry & Creative Practice), University of Canberra
Paul Munden is Postdoctoral Research Fellow (Poetry & Creative Practice) at the University of Canberra. He is General Editor of Writing in Education and Writing in Practice, both published by the National Association of Writers in Education (NAWE), of which he is Director. He has worked as conference poet for the British Council and edited Feeling the Pressure: Poetry and science of climate change. Analogue/Digital, a volume of his new and... Read More →

Speakers
OB

Owen Bullock

HDR Student, University of Canberra
Owen Bullock’s publications include urban haiku (Recent Work Press, 2015), A Cornish Story (Palores, 2010) and sometimes the sky isn’t big enough (Steele Roberts, 2010). He has edited a number of journals and anthologies, including Poetry NZ. He won the Canberra Critics’ Circle Award for Poetry 2015, and is a PhD Candidate in Creative Writing at the University of Canberra.
avatar for Katrina Finlayson

Katrina Finlayson

HDR Student, Flinders University
Katrina Finlayson is a Creative Writing doctoral candidate at Flinders University, in South Australia. She mostly writes short pieces of prose and creative nonfiction, usually focused on ideas about identity and travel. Her doctoral research explores how contemporary creative writing might engage with the psychoanalytical theory of the Uncanny.
BF

Brentley Frazer

HDR Student, Griffith University
Brentley Frazer is a contemporary Australian poet, novelist, academic and editor. | He holds a MA (writing) from James Cook University and will complete a PhD (creative writing) from Griffith University in 2016. His texts have been published in numerous national and international anthologies, journals, magazines, newspapers and other periodicals. Brentley’s experimental memoir Scoundrel Days is forthcoming from... Read More →
avatar for Andrew Melrose

Andrew Melrose

Professor of Writing, University of Winchester
Andrew Melrose is Professor of Writing for Children and Creative Writing at the University of Winchester, UK. He has over 160 film, fiction, nonfiction, research, songs, poems and other writing credits, including 15 films, 4 scholarly and 30 creative books. He is also the editor of the journal Write4Children and has written a number of books, articles and book chapters on various aspects of critical and creative writing and on child-centered... Read More →


Monday November 28, 2016 1:30pm - 2:30pm
2A4 Building 2, UC

1:30pm

To Write or Not to Write :: 2A14
Willo Drummond: 

“Pressed between the mind’s pages”: Denise Levertov’s ‘Rilke Index’ and practices of artistic cognition.

This paper speaks to the ‘cognitive turn’ in creative writing research (Freiman 2015). Reflecting upon a recent period of archival research examining the early notebooks of mid-Twentieth Century American poet Denise Levertov at Cecil H. Green Library, Stanford University, it considers the poet’s various ‘notebooking’ practices during the years 1946-58 through the lens of ‘4E’ (or distributed) cognition. Specifically, via Richard Menary’s second wave extended mind thesis: ‘Cognitive Integration’.

A lifelong keeper of a range of journals and notebooks, in the early years of her career Levertov also created and maintained a personal and idiosyncratic index to the Selected Letters of Rainer Maria Rilke 1902-1926 (Trans., R.F.C. Hull, 1946), a text she noted on several occasions as playing a formative role in her artistic development. Several concepts and passages from the Selected Letters

would appear in Levertov’s notebooks and published writings throughout her career and as such this ‘index’ not only prompts consideration of the role of homage (or theft?) in the creative writing process, but also suggests a new negotiation of the line between influence studies and intertextuality, one which does not jettison the embodied writer for the sake of the text. Rather, Cognitive Integration takes a hybrid, systems view of mind in which the keeping of notebooks (and related artefacts) is viewed as an example of extended cognition. By this view, ‘artistic cognition’ (Sutton 2002) is constituted by bodily manipulation of word on page by a situated writer in a practice of cognitive-material looping. Such a perspective allows for a dynamic view of creative writing ‘thinking’ as ‘embodied’, ‘embedded’, ‘enacted’ and ‘extended’, and of influence as a feature of a cognitive practice comprised of embodied writer actively engaged in a coupled dance with the materiality of language. 


 


Amelia Walker: Why I don’t write (much): a self-case study in homage to Orwell and Rilke  

In a ‘publish or perish’ culture’, not writing and/or publishing extensively in one’s main creative writing genre or genres can for creative writing academics seem a terrifying prospect (Krauth, Gandolfo & Brien 2015, n.p.). In addition to individual stress, ‘not writing’ leaves our field vulnerable to challenges from those who question creative writing’s place in academia, thereby undermining the ongoing stability of creative writing pedagogy and research. This paper confronts the ‘not writing’ problem via a self-case study entailing discussion of two keystone texts – Orwell’s Why I Write (1946) and Rilke’s Letters to a Young Poet (1945). Following Orwell’s lead (1946, n.p.), the study initially considers situated forces that nineteen years ago prompted my first poetic forays. It then traces subsequent shifts in my writerly motives, style and practices. These shifts reflect multiple attempts at or approaches to perennial dilemmas of writerly ethicality, particularly regarding authorship as theft or usurpation of cultural authority. Through analysis of the self-case study, this paper generates an explication of my present ‘not writing’ as an engaged, reasoned practice, and thereupon argues the oft-overlooked merits of ‘not-writing’ – the active, often ethically-driven non-writing and/or non-publishing of texts in one’s primary genre, paired with strenuous engagement in other, complementary but perhaps less-visible literary activities. Exploration into not-writing can, I contend, valuably illuminate benefits of creative writing practices in and beyond contemporary universities. This paper thus concludes with a call for greater attention to, and respect for, not-writing as something able to richly inform ongoing creative writing pedagogy and research.

Dominique Hecq: Crimes of letters: the crow, the fox and me

All aesthetics of appropriation entail acts of transgression predicated on the art of citational writing, from mere allusion to punning, quotation, pastiche, parody, sampling, remix and homage. ‘Citational writing underscores the double movement of quotation,’ writes Della Pollock in a now famous paper on performativity (Pollock 1998: 94), affirming that ‘it stages its own citationality, re-sighting citation, displaying it in an accumulation of quotations or self quotations…with the primary effect of reclaiming citation for affiliation’ (Pollock 1998: 94. My emphasis). As such, aesthetics of appropriation presuppose the existence of both Other and other and cannot be deemed nihilistic as has been suggested, especially in the context of critiques of postmodernism. Notwithstanding their intent, aesthetics of appropriation tacitly attribute to language both an evocative and communicatory dimension. But what lies beyond the drive for ‘affiliation’ intimated by Pollock? ‘Crimes of letters: the crow, the fox and me’ explores the kinship between textuality and felony—real or imagined—within the authorised context of the reader-response contract, however misprisioned. The wager of this ‘creative artful fact,’ otherwise called artefact,  is for ‘authorised theft’ to exceed what one might be reluctant to call ‘original’ material after Harold Bloom returned the course of philological forays into textual begetting back to anxieties of influence (Bloom 1973).

Jeri Kroll: The Author as Originator, Adaptor or Thief: Plagiarism and Self-Plagiarism

When authors publish under their own names they make a social contract with readers, declaring that the work is original. Foucault (1977), Bourdieu (1996), Sawyer (2006) and Sennett (2008), among others, have problematised the concept of authorship by focusing on its cultural and economic functions in a complex marketplace. The copyright page in a printed text or online publication confirms to the world that the writer claims ownership, with statements such as ‘all rights reserved.’  Authors, therefore, cannot but be aware of a continuum inhering in the literary process that begins with unattainable originality and ends with intentional theft. Along this continuum exist varying degrees of unconscious and conscious borrowing of another’s words or ideas. The terms original, plagiarised and self-plagiarised can be both descriptive and emotive. This paper interrogates the practices of plagiarism, self-plagiarism and double-dipping in order to clarify the dangers of misappropriation and violation of copyright; it also considers forms of intellectual and creative theft. The manner in which writers integrate literary and critical influences to produce authentic work has become more challenging in the twenty-first century where so much of the past and the present exist online. An understanding of concepts such as originality, creativity and plagiarism can help practitioners and students to negotiate this mercurial educational and cultural environment.





Moderators
avatar for Debra Wain

Debra Wain

Deakin University
Debra Wain holds a BA(hons) in Creative Writing. She is a current PhD candidate and sessional academic in the School of Communication and Creative Arts at Deakin University. Debra is undertaking creative practice research into women, food and culture through her creation of a collection of short stories and a ficto-critical exegesis.

Speakers
WD

Willo Drummond

PhD Candidate, Macquarie University
Willo Drummond is a poet, PhD candidate, and tutor in Creative Writing at Macquarie University. She writes about human and non-human animals, gender, and the fragile landscapes of identity. Recent publications include Cordite, Meniscus, AustralianPoetry Anthology 2015, Mascara and the US based little magazine, Yellowfield. | Willo’s 2014 Master of Research thesis examined the ethics of the lyric mode in Australian ecopoetics, with a focus... Read More →
DH

Dominique Hecq

Associate Professor, Writing, Swinburne University of Technology
Dominique Hecq  has a background in literary studies, psychoanalysis and translation. Towards a Poetics of Creative Writing (2015) explores creative writing in the academy as an avenue for investigations of creativity while examining the relevance of psychoanalysis for the arts. She has published thirteen major creative works of which Stretchmarks of Sun (2014) is a companion piece to Out of... Read More →
JK

Jeri Kroll

Flinders University
Jeri Kroll is Professor of English and Creative Writing at Flinders University and an award-winning writer for adults and young people. Recent creative books are Workshopping the Heart: New and Selected Poems (Wakefield 2013) and a verse novel, Vanishing Point (Puncher and Wattman), shortlisted for the 2015 Queensland Literary Awards. A George Washington University stage adaptation was a winner in the 47th Kennedy Center American College... Read More →
AW

Amelia Walker

University of South Australia
Amelia Walker completed her PhD in early 2016 through the University of South Australia, where she now works teaching courses in creative writing and literature.


Monday November 28, 2016 1:30pm - 2:30pm
2A14 Building 2, UC

2:30pm

Constructing Narratives :: 2A4
Shady Cosgrove: One page and counting – beginnings and narrative construction

The submission requirements for Manhattan-based agent Jeff Kleinman at Folio Literary Management read:
Please email your cover letter and paste in the first page or so of your material at the bottom of the letter (no attachments, please). Let's repeat that again: first page of your manuscript. Not a synopsis. First page. Please.
Julie Barer, another prominent agent who founded The Book Group, allows authors to submit ten pages. These examples are typical of the industry, underlining the point that beginnings are critical for authors within the commercial environment. Interestingly, despite this industry focus on beginnings, the subject area hasn’t attracted much theoretical attention. Key texts in the field include Edward Said’s Beginnings (1975) and A.D. Nuttall’s Openings (1992) as well as edited collections such as Brian Richardson’s Narrative Dynamics (2002) and Narrative Beginnings (2008). However in the larger field of novels and narratology relatively little attention has been paid to something that is determining much of our literary industry. As narratologist James Phelan states (2007): ‘Previous narrative theory, for the most part, has emphasized the textual rather than the readerly side of narrative beginnings’ (15/6). This paper will explore beginnings from both a critical and readerly/writerly perspective, arguing they are important to consider, not only for commercial reasons but because, as in Said’s words, ‘[b]eginnings … inspire anticipation. A beginning ‘is already a project under way’. That is, beginnings set up the stories we can tell.

NIcholas Velissaris: “Now where I have seen that before?” Using Genre Conventions as Shortcut to Aid Narrative Comprehension

Melete’s Story is a choice-based narrative similar to the Choose Your Own Adventure series published by Bantam books in the 1980s/90s. In choice-based narratives the reader is able to choose how the story proceeds and many examples of this form use genre as a shortcut to assist the reader in making decisions.
      Using genre rules and conventions enables a writer to borrow from existing stories and events to help the reader quickly understand the narrative. This type of priming allows a reader to more easily grasp the flow of the story and encourages a level of agency that permits the reader to make decisions about how the story should proceed.
      Melete’s Story borrows heavily from the genres of political and conspiracy thrillers and from world events from the 1970s and 80s.  The narrative is based upon three major world events: the Watergate scandal, the end of the Cold War and the rise of military dictatorships throughout South America. Several sources, both fictional and factual, serve as the backbone for the story, these include Alan J. Pakula’s All the President’s Men (1976), and Costas-Gavras’ State of Siege (1972) and Missing (1981).
      As these events have occurred in the recent past (the last 50 years), this presents an interesting dichotomy that allows for a blurring between the facts and the fiction. The writer can (and does) exploit this so that the reader will make assumptions about these events, and these assumptions can be used to control a reader’s focus and to anticipate how they will make decisions within the story.  This paper will look at how ‘borrowing’ from genre and recent history has shaped the development and construction of Melete’s Story and how this has extended my creative practice.

Hayley Elliot-Ryan: Salvaging Bricolage: Writing Fiction as Devious Research 
The concept of bricolage has influenced research practices across many academic fields, but it has also received criticism for being a less rigorous and more devious form of research. I trace the origin of the ‘bricoleur’ and map the way Levi-Strauss’ definition of bricolage has been taken up by both the structuralist and post-structuralist theorists, in order to refine the definition and practice(s) of the bricoleur. Evaluating the principal criticisms and applications of bricolage, I argue that modalities of bricolage are productive for the academic researcher working in the field of creative writing, producing research in the form of an artefact and exegesis. Finally, I consider the bricoleur’s practice as a practice of resistance to capitalism and to a trajectory that favours the product, concluding that the creative practice of the bricoleur favours the process of making. 

Julia Prendergast: Colour me Grey 

‘Colour me grey’ is a story about a teenage girl managing the care of her dysfunctional mother and her confused grandfather. The story is told in first person from the perspective of Annie’s daughter, Chelsea. ‘Colour me grey’ was a finalist in the Glimmer Train International Short Story Award for New Writers (US) 2013 and the Glimmer Train International Family Matters Short Story Award (US) 2014. The story was a finalist in the Southern Cross Short Story Competition 2015, judged by Tony Birch. The revised work was shortlisted for the Josephine Ulrick Prize 2016 and published by Review of Australian Fiction (RAF) 2016.

In the context of authorised theft— ‘Colour me grey’ is a response to a haunting spark. In an interview with Claude Grimal, titled: ‘Stories Don’t Come Out of Thin Air’, Carver describes how remembered detail can be fashioned into story. Carver says:

I use certain autobiographical elements [from my life…] an image, a sentence I heard, something I saw, that I did, and then I try to transform that into something else. Yes, there's a little autobiography and, I hope, a lot of imagination. But there's always a little element that throws off a spark […] Stories don't come out of thin air. There's a spark. And that's the kind of story that most interests me.

That’s the kind of story that most interests me too. ‘Colour me grey’ is a story about light in dark—shades of grey.

Stull W L (trans), 1995-96, Prose as Architecture: Two Interviews with Raymond Carver, Clockwatch Review Inc.

http://sun.iwu.edu/~jplath/carver.html


Moderators
RT

Ruby Todd

Ruby Todd is a writer of prose and poetry, with a PhD in Creative Writing and Literary Theory from Deakin University, where she teaches. Her research work investigates the ethics of writing elegy, with reference to mourning studies, poetics, and environmental philosophy.

Speakers
SC

Shady Cosgrove

Associate Professor, University of Wollongong
Shady Cosgrove is an Associate Professor in Creative Writing at the University of Wollongong. Her books include What the Ground Can’t Hold (Picador, 2013) and She Played Elvis (Allen and Unwin, 2009), which was shortlisted for the Australian Vogel Prize. Her shorter works have appeared in Southerly, Overland, Antipodes and Best Australian Stories.
HE

Hayley Elliot-Ryan

Hayley Elliott-Ryan is a Melbourne based writer/maker, true crime and chihuahua enthusiast. Hayley is currently completing her PhD at Deakin University.
JP

Julia Prendergast

Writer
Julia Prendergast has a PhD in Writing and Literature. Julia is a short fiction addict. Her stories have been longlisted, shortlisted and published: Lightship Anthology 2 (UK), Glimmer Train (US), TEXT (AU) Séan Ó Faoláin Competition, (IE), Review of Australian Fiction, Australian Book Review, Elizabeth Jolley Prize, Josephine Ulrick Prize (AU). Julia's theoretical work has been published: TEXT... Read More →
NV

Nicholas Velissaris

RMIT
Nicholas Peter Velissaris is a doctoral candidate at RMIT University who is in the process of finalising his submission for his PhD. His practice-based dissertation is on identifying and defining a poetics of choice-based narratives and establishing a framework that creative writers can follow to create their own choice-based work. Through his practice he has written a choice-based narrative called Melete’s Story which tells the story of... Read More →


Monday November 28, 2016 2:30pm - 3:30pm
2A4 Building 2, UC

2:30pm

Threads of Pain and Trauma :: 2A6
John Dale: Writing about the Dead

This paper investigates the difficulties in writing about victims of violent crime and draws on the author’s own experiences of researching two books about murdered women. It examines the legal processes and ethical issues involved in gathering information. Do writers treat the dead differently? What are the principles and practices involved in writing about the dead? What motivates a writer to write about a murder victim is not easily explained. It may be an image, a headline, a vague idea that only becomes clearer the more they investigate. Writing about the dead involves penetrating below the surface of things, uncovering the complexities of narrative and character. There is always lurking at the back of the writer’s mind an uncertainty, a constant self-questioning: Am I doing the right thing? If it’s true that all writing of the narrative kind is motivated, deep down, by a fear of and a fascination with mortality – then, for the writer, writing about the dead involves a journey into the unknown, driven by that innate curiosity we all share of what lies beyond the grave. 

Nathan Smale: Transacting Trauma: Reader transaction theory and fictocritical infinity.

Empathy is defined as the capacity to think and feel oneself into the inner life of another person. However there has been a long-held belief that empathy has limitations as feelings and thoughts, although they can be talked about by others, cannot be seen, or had by them, leaving empathy as an approximation of what is felt. In contemporary theories of empathy personal experience and self-awareness are seen as the shaping forces behind how close the approximation of feelings and thoughts can be. Psychoanalysis shows that it is possible to improve self-awareness and challenges the contexts of our self-narratives, raising the question of whether it is possible to construct an experienced and aware self which is capable of a higher, more accurate empathetic response. 
      Through the lens of psychoanalysis this paper will explore the empathetic relationship between reader and trauma texts using reader transaction theory and fictocriticism. Reader transaction theory emphasises a dialogic relationship between reader and text and will be used to demonstrate how the reading experience develops self-awareness and how that awareness shapes further reading experiences. This development of self will be combined with fictocriticism, a genre which occurs in the excess of speech and knowledge, in an attempt to fill in the gaps in the empathetic experience of a traumatic text. This combination of reader transaction and fictocriticism will be used to explore the following question: What are the limits, in the reading process, on forming a complete understanding of a traumatic experience?

Anna Denejkina: Exo-Autoethnography: writing and research on intergenerational transmission of trauma

Since the late 1970s, autoethnographic research and writing has progressively demonstrated that non-fiction creative writing practice can aptly utilise this alternate-ethnographic method as part of its research and narrative, producing rigorous creative work which is palatable both by the academy and the general audience: bringing a social science closer to literature.

This paper proposes the use of the methodological model I am calling exo-autoethnography as a distinct ethnographic method of qualitative research within non-fiction creative writing, and autoethnographic writing, that deals with intergenerational familial trauma.

Exo-autoethnography is an approach to research that seeks to analyse (graphy) individual and private experience (auto) as directed by the other’s experience or history (exo) to better understand:

1. A history that impacted the researcher by proxy; and

2. Personal and community experience (ethno) as related to that history.

Exo-autoethnography is the autoethnographic exploration of a history whose events the researcher (author) did not experience directly, but a history that impacted the researcher through familial, or other personal connections.

Placing focus on a history that impacted the self (author) by proxy, the methodology aims to connect the present with a history of the other through intergenerational transmission of trauma and/or experiences of an upbringing influenced by parental trauma.

 

Katie Sutherland:  Striking a balance: Creative non-fiction storytelling on children, parenting and disability

The genre of personal non-fiction narrative holds gravitas in creating social awareness and in helping a writer come to grips with their own reality. However, much thought must also be given to issues of ethics and privacy. Authors should ask themselves: under what circumstances do they have ownership over another person’s story? Further responsibilities must be considered if that person is actually the storyteller’s child.
      This presentation primarily draws on the author’s Doctoral project, Painting the spectrum: Everyday stories of families living with high functioning autism, a collection of narratives that fuses together the author’s reflections on being a mother with the stories of interview subjects. The presentation also draws on the exemplar text Beyond the pale: Folklore, family and the mystery of our hidden genes (2016), whereby author Emily Urquhart finds “salve in the search” for information about her daughter’s albinism (p 257). Urquhart utilises conversations, photographs and legends to piece together her daughter’s genetic make-up. Rather than a biography on her daughter Sadie, it is a nuanced piece of research on albinism and accepting a child with difference. It offers pause for thought on how to tackle vulnerable writing about one’s own family, and how to adequately represent the complexities of parenting and disability.
      Both Beyond the pale and Painting the spectrum (a work in progress) employ writing techniques that creatively retell the stories of others, including the authors’ own families. Neither text professes to share the entirety of their subjects’ stories, however they do go part way in providing a map upon which readers are invited to reflect and respond. The challenge for the authors is in knowing where to ‘draw the line’ and where to place the map’s boundaries.

 

Moderators
avatar for Caren Florance

Caren Florance

HDR student, University of Canberra
Caren Florance is a research student and sessional design tutor in the Faculty of Arts & Design at the University of Canberra, Australia. She often works under the imprint Ampersand Duck, and is an artist whose work focuses on the book and the printed word, using traditional letterpress and bookbinding processes along with more contemporary technologies. She also teaches at the ANU School of Art and is collected by national and... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for John Dale

John Dale

Writer, UTS
JOHN DALE is the author of seven books including the best-selling Huckstepp, and two crime novels The Dogs Are Barking and Dark Angel, which won a Ned Kelly Award. His other books are a memoir, Wild Life, and a campus novel Leaving Suzie Pye, which was translated into Turkish. He has written a novella, Plenty, and his latest crime novel, Detective Work, was based on an unsolved Sydney murder.  | He is Professor of Creative... Read More →
avatar for Anna Denejkina

Anna Denejkina

PhD Candidate; Casual Academic, University of Technology Sydney
Anna Denejkina is a writer, and PhD Candidate with the University of Technology Sydney (UTS). She is a casual academic at UTS, and has a Master’s degree in journalism from the university. Her current research focuses on ethics of autoethnography, and familial relationships pertaining to returned Soviet veterans of the Soviet-Afghan War, 1979 to ’89.
NS

Nathan Smale

Swinburne University of Technology
Nathan Smale is Master's student at Swinburne University. His current academic pursuit is in reader response and transaction, the back and forth between reader and text, focusing on self-creation and understanding. He plans on continuing this research into a doctorate.
KS

Katie Sutherland

HDR Student, Western Sydney University
Katie Sutherland is a Doctoral Candidate at Western Sydney University’s Writing and Society Research Centre. Her Doctorate of Creative Arts research project incorporates a collection of narratives about families living with high functioning autism, utilising an autoethnographic methodological framework. She is interested in the use of personal writing as a platform for advocacy. Katie holds a Bachelor of Arts (English) and Bachelor of... Read More →


Monday November 28, 2016 2:30pm - 3:30pm
2A6 Building 2, UC

2:30pm

From Real to Virtual: The Case of Digital Theft :: 2A12
Maria Takolander: Theft as creative methodology: A case study of digital narratives

Creativity is often still Romantically conceived and valued in terms of its purity and originality. However, this paper argues that theft – or revisionism – has been a fundamental methodology of creative practice from ancient times through to the digital age. Creativity is visionary only insofar as it is revisionary, and this is because, as common sense confirms, it always emerges from within a cultural domain. The first section of this paper outlines a revisionary theory of creative praxis that contests the Romantic concept of the auto-intoxicated creative practitioner. Following the work of Pierre Bourdieu, I advance a theory of revisionary creativity grounded in the ‘field of cultural production.’ The second part of the paper explores how literary revisionism manifests itself as a central methodology of creative practice in the digital era. The paper concludes with a brief study of an interactive digital narrative project that draws attention to theft or revisionism as its central methodology. We Tell Stories is a collaborative venture between Penguin Books in the UK and the digital games developer Six-to-Start, which consists of a series of six interactive digital narratives, each one of which revises a literary genre or classic story. In line with David Jay Bolter’s and Richard Grusin’s theory of remediation, this project of theft or appropriation illustrates the revisionary interplay and competition between different media in the cultural field. Certainly the revisionary methodologies of We Tell Stories, as this paper argues, are inextricable from a transitional publishing economy in which the digital both threatens conventional literary publishing and embodies its commercial future.

Rhett Davis: Author/Developer, Reader/Player: games in experimental fiction and experimental fiction in games

In the twentieth century many writers experimented with the form of the novel, from the Modernists James Joyce and Virginia Woolf; to the Oulipo group of Raymond Queneau, Italo Calvino and Georges Perec; to contemporary writers such as Jennifer Egan, Mark Z. Danielewski and Robert Coover. Despite their attempts the overall shape of fiction narrative has not been significantly altered in the popular consciousness. Meanwhile, an entirely new and extremely popular medium for narrative has emerged in recent decades—that present in interactive digital entertainment, or video games—and its writers and developers are grappling with many of the experimental narrative techniques previously attempted by many fiction writers. In this paper I compare the works of B.S. Johnson’s The Unfortunates and Raymond Queneau’s Exercises in Style to the games Everybody’s Gone to the Rapture and The Stanley Parable, and argue that there are significant parallels in their use of randomness and narrative repetition and revision. I conclude that significant narrative experimentation is now being played out in the minds of many game writers and designers around the world, and suggest that a popular revolution in narrative form anticipated by writers such as Queneau and Johnson might not take place in the novel at all, but in games. 

Brooke Maggs:  The Writer Between: Thieving Literary Plot to Design Game Narrative

This paper will trace my creative process as I move from writer of traditional literature to digital literature. This proposes a number of challenges for the traditional writer moving into game writing. They must understand the reader is a player with motivations related to gameplay (solving puzzles, achievement, progression). Narrative can provide a context (a game world) and incentive (reward) for gameplay, but challenge is to communicate the motivations of the characters within the story to the player. These challenges are tied to the ability of the writer to communicate the story to the development team and work with them to articulate it in the game.
       Facing these challenges meant shifting to a design approach to storytelling as a narrative designer. An approach with a revisionist methodology: thieving the voyage and return plot structure and retelling it with a game narrative toolbox. This analysis of my writing practice shows that literary theft was crucial for considering the wider possibilities of interactivity that move beyond read-response theoretical understandings (Iser 1976) of how the reader constructs their understanding of the text. Given a game is an ergodic text, the player will construct the meaning of the narrative in this way and also construct their game experience.  I argue writing for games requires the author to also imagine the reader’s and the player’s interactions, and this paper investigates the implications of this on the creative writing process.

 

Moderators
avatar for Jordan Williams

Jordan Williams

Associate Professor of Creative Writing, University of Canberra
Associate Professor Jordan Williams is a poet and multimedia artist who teaches literature and creative writing at the University of Canberra. She researches the materiality of poetry and the use of ‘play’ in creative writing interventions for wellbeing and health. She has led the creative writing stream of two Defence ARRTS programs designed to promote the health and wellbeing of injured and ill Defence personnel.

Speakers
RD

Rhett Davis

Deakin University
Rhett Davis is commencing his PhD at Deakin University in Geelong having recently completed a Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada. His research focuses on combining traditional fiction and digital forms. His short fiction has been published in Australia and North America, in places like The Big Issue, The Sleepers Almanac, Page Seventeen and The Dalhousie Review.
avatar for Brooke Maggs

Brooke Maggs

PhD Candidate, Deakin Univeristy
Brooke is a co-director of Burning Glass Creative where she uses her skills in writing, narrative design and production to support a variety of projects in games, book publishing and other creative industries. She helps others tell stories and chart the course for their creative work, drawing on over seven years of experience teaching games studies, user experience design, cultural studies, and project management at a tertiary level. A PhD... Read More →
avatar for Maria Takolander

Maria Takolander

Associate Professor, Deakin University
Associate Professor Maria Takolander has published numerous papers theorising creativity. She is the author of two full-length collections of poetry, The End of the World (Giramondo, 2014) and Ghostly Subjects (Salt 2009), which was shortlisted for a Queensland Premier’s Prize. The winner of the inaugural ABR Elizabeth Jolley Short Story Prize, Maria is also the author of The Double (and Other Stories) (Text, 2013), which was shortlisted for... Read More →


Monday November 28, 2016 2:30pm - 3:30pm
2A12 Building 2, UC

2:30pm

Memoir :: 2A13
Jeremy Fisher: Lenora Jane Frayne
‘Lenora Jane Frayne’ comprises two small sections from a larger work of creative non-fiction and fiction based on my research into my family history. Much of this larger work is based on traditional research and conforms to the tenets of biographical writing in that statements are supported by facts and evidence. Some sections of the larger work, however, are purely imagined, though inspired by known facts and historical evidence. They are my attempts to cast light where my traditional research provided none. On one hand I have stolen the identity of family members I never knew and used them in fictional narratives; on the other hand I have used what facts I could uncover from historical sources to create a biographical narrative. ‘Lenora Jane Frayne’ offers an example of the imagined as well as a more traditional biographical sketch.

Katrin Den Elzen: Ticking the Box
This creative piece, Ticking the Box, is a short memoir depicting my grief as a young widow and portraying aspects of the journey of recovery from that loss. The opening scene shows having to tick the box ‘widowed’ for the first time on an official form shortly after my husband’s death and then explores my response to the unwanted identity of ‘young widow’. This includes the first solo visit for dinner at the home of a befriended couple, conveying the awkwardness felt by all. A flashback takes the reader back to when my husband and I first met each other in Egypt, where we were both traveling as young backpackers. It depicts the first days spent together against the stunning backdrop of the temples in Luxor and concludes with the buying of an artefact, which now sits on my bedside table, a tangible connection to the past. The text explores how to integrate the memories of the past, of twenty years spent together, into the future in a way that offers the past as well as the future its own space. This work explores issues of identity, grief and premature loss. It recognises the dead as vulnerable subjects and strives for an ethical representation of the deceased. 

Nicole Crowe:  Spitting Distance

This short story is a non-traditional research output produced as part of a PhD in creative writing that explores the narrative possibilities of humour in the ethical representation of family members in regional Australian family memoir.
     While offering a counterpoint to the recent shift towards trauma narrative in Australian autobiography (McCooey 27), this short story explores how techniques of humour can be employed to navigate the very real challenges around representing living family members in narrative.  

Simone Lyons: Relational lives: the dog memoir within the personal memoir

The dog holds a special place as companion, worker and icon in Australian culture and the nation’s rural heritage. Representations of dogs in Australian art, literature and other media reflect the interwoven lives of dogs and Australian people, and reinforce the dog’s iconic status. Dogs are also portrayed as valued workers and companions in many recently published memoirs of rural Australians.
Relational narrative – that is, narrative about related others in the autobiographical writer’s life – is a common feature of contemporary memoir. It enables the writer to relate their own story through other characters, and can offer a more extensive account of the writer’s life events and defining relationships. Rural Australian memoirs frequently include relational narrative in which the related others are the writers’ dogs.
This paper examines how dogs’ life stories are incorporated as relational narrative in rural Australian memoirs. It draws on memoirs published since 2001 – such as Kerry McGinnis’s Heart Country (2001) – to illustrate that the dog’s and writer’s portrayed life experiences can be intertwined in such a way that the dog’s memoir is embedded in the personal memoir. The findings of this paper will relate to and extend scholarship on Australian life writing and, more specifically, relational narrative.

Linda Devereux: A Bit Scottish
There is very little research on the effects of overseas missionary work on the children of missionaries. These children may spend many years living in challenging cross cultural settings. Some experience multiple separations from parents, siblings and loved ones to attend boarding schools or further education, while a number are caught up in violent civil wars or experience other trauma such as regular exposure to the effects of extreme poverty. ‘Home’ can be a slippery construct. This creative piece, taken from a longer life-writing project, examines how memory triggers, in particular photographs and landscapes, contribute to developing an understanding of who we are and where we belong. 

Moderators
avatar for Debra Wain

Debra Wain

Deakin University
Debra Wain holds a BA(hons) in Creative Writing. She is a current PhD candidate and sessional academic in the School of Communication and Creative Arts at Deakin University. Debra is undertaking creative practice research into women, food and culture through her creation of a collection of short stories and a ficto-critical exegesis.

Speakers
NC

Nicole Crowe

James Cook University
Nicole Crowe is a James Cook University PhD candidate, majoring in creative writing. Her thesis explores the narrative possibilities of humour in regional Australian family memoir. Her creative writing has been featured in LiNQ, Bumf, The Suburban Review, Talent Implied, Stilts Journal, Cuttings Magazine, Spook, and was longlisted in 2015 for the Richell Prize for Emerging Writers.
LD

Linda Devereux

Head, Academic Language and Learning Unit, UNSW Canberra
Linda Devereux spent her early childhood years in Africa where her parents were medical missionaries in an isolated Baptist Missionary Society hospital in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Caught up in post-colonial violence, the family returned to Scotland before moving to Australia where Linda currently lives and works.  Linda is the head of the Academic Language and Learning Unit at UNSW Canberra. Her doctoral work, a creative... Read More →
KD

Katrin Den Elzen

Curtin University
Katrin Den Elzen holds an MPhil and currently undertakes a PhD in Creative Writing at Curtin University, which entails a creative component and an accompanying exegesis. She is writing a grief memoir about the loss of her husband and the rebuilding of her life and identity. Her exegesis investigates how memoirists textually negotiate the experience of young widowhood, and specifically, how they rebuild the fragmented self in the text. Katrin... Read More →
avatar for Jeremy Fisher

Jeremy Fisher

Senior Lecturer, Writing, University of New England
Jeremy Fisher is Senior Lecturer in Writing at the University of New England after a 40-year career as writer, editor, publisher, and award-winning indexer. A former executive director of the Australian Society of Authors, he remains a strong advocate for authors’ interests. Concerned that authors can profit from the digital economy, he maintains a close interest in this area. A former director of the Australian Copyright Council; currently a... Read More →
SL

Simone Lyons

PhD candidate, University of New England
Simone Lyons is a PhD candidate in Writing at the University of New England. She is researching the role of the dog in 21st-century rural Australian memoirs.


aawp2016 pptx

Monday November 28, 2016 2:30pm - 3:30pm
2A13 Building 2, UC

2:30pm

Teaching Creative Writing :: 2B11
Pip Newling: ‘Teaching writing, teaching whiteness with Fiona Nicoll and Kim Scott’ 

This paper retells the semester-long experiment I ran teaching a subject titled ‘Writing across borders’ at the University of Wollongong in 2016. Using Kim Scott’s novel That Deadman Dance as the spine of the course, students addressed the literary techniques of cross-cultural writing, magical realism, metafiction, creative nonfiction and cross-platform writing. With the focus on Scott’s novel came the focus on race and on Indigenous and non-Indigenous relationships in Australia and the stories told of these relationships. I employed Fiona Nicoll’s approach to race discussions in the classroom by utilising her concept of critical whiteness theory and the significance of Indigenous sovereignty to discussions of this ilk. I also used her 2004 essay ‘Are you calling me a racist?’ (Nicoll, 2004) as a guide and companion across the course. Was it a success? Depending on the measure – student engagement, experimenting with the course ideas in their work, richness of the classroom discussions – the outcomes were a mixed bag. But was it fruitful, challenging and rewarding? Yes. Would I do it again? Of course. 

 Denise Beckton (Donna Lee Brien, Margaret McAllister, and Alison Owens): Robbing from Peter to Pay Paul?: Insights from a study investigating Interdisciplinary Doctoral Research Training Opportunities 

Recent studies on the contemporary PhD report that conventional approaches to doctoral preparation do not always effectively produce graduates who are confident researchers, and call for effective approaches to meet training needs. Yet within the higher education sector there are pockets of innovation that, because of the separation of disciplines, do not reach the wider community. Moreover, discipline-based competitive research evaluation processes deplete incentives for cross-fertilisation and exchange of ideas. This paper reports on a recent pilot project involving interdisciplinary collaboration between research higher degree supervisors from the seemingly very distinct disciplines of creative writing and nursing. This paper explains how we took from varied sources from within the same institution – and indeed from the same campus – to use it for other purposes and how, in this practice, although we were transgressing disciplinary boundaries, we were also yielding superior outcomes. The paper begins by identifying contemporary Doctoral candidate academic training needs and will describe how, in gathering strategies that were effective in overcoming impasses encountered by both RHD candidates and supervisors, a series of common research thresholds were identified. It then investigates how these may be met in an interdisciplinary manner. In this, interdisciplinary Doctoral training practices using creative writing as a key disciplinary contributor are identified.

 Kirk Dodd: Imitatio specialis: Shakespeare, Virgil, chronographia, and a new play called Bennelong

This paper seeks to promote the classical ethos of imitating a master’s art, imitatio specialis, as a legitimate method for creating original work and a productive application of academic research. This involves a demonstration of my imitation of one of many devices used by Shakespeare, chronographia (or the vivid description of time), in the development of a new play called: ‘The Tragicall Hiftorie of Woollarawarre Bennelong, Native Ambassador of Nova Hollandia’, which aims to achieve a ‘Shakespearean’ aesthetic. This paper will introduce the ethos of imitatio specialis and Shakespeare’s application of chronographia, before analysing two passages from my play Bennelong that imitate Shakespeare’s concerns with chronographia. The paper also examines a figure developed by Virgil to assist writing chronographiae, and how Shakespeare imitates this figure; thus in turn, how I imitate Shakespeare’s imitations of Virgil. Where Shakespeare is an authority on most things poetical, and Virgil was one of Shakespeare’s authorities, this becomes a demonstration of authorized theft that provides productive contributions to both ‘creative writing’ and ‘author study’ pedagogies.

Enza Gandolfo: Whose space? Feminism and creative writing pedagogy

Where is feminism in creative writing pedagogy? Creative writing programs in Australian and overseas universities are often taught by feminist writers and academics. This is evident in the scholarly articles published by writer academics about their own writing, and about writing practice, theory and research that often engage with feminist theory. However, little has been written about how feminist theory is incorporated into the creative writing classroom if at all.
      As a feminist researcher, writer and academic, I am committed to developing and delivering a critically engaged curriculum that celebrates the diversity of feminism and feminist approaches, and encourages writing that exposes and challenges privilege, and investigates issues of power and inequality in relation to gender but also in relation to sexuality, race and disability. I am interested in how feminism can encroach on the often apolitical space of the creative writing classroom and transform it.
      This paper is a review of the literature on creative writing pedagogy, and an exploration of the way that a feminist approach to teaching writing pedagogy can provide an effective means of engaging students in creative writing that is politically and socially engaged. 

 


Moderators
avatar for Jen Webb

Jen Webb

Distinguished Professor of Creative Practice, University of Canberra
Jen Webb is Distinguished Professor of Creative Practice at the University of Canberra, and Director of the Centre for Creative and Cultural Research. Her work includes scholarly volumes Researching Creative Writing (Frontinus, 2015) and Art and Human Rights: Contemporary Asian Contexts (with Caroline Turner; Manchester UP, 2016), and poetry volumes Watching the World (with Paul Hetherington; Blemish Books, 2015) and Stolen Stories, Borrowed... Read More →

Speakers
DB

Denise Beckton

Central Queensland University
With a background in public health and education, Denise Beckton is a Lecturer in Creative Industries at Central Queensland University in Noosa, Queensland. Denise has recently completed a research higher degree in Creative Industries (creative writing), which comprised the writing of a Young Adult novel and a related dissertation that explores the construction and use of invented languages in fiction. Denise is the recipient of multiple awards... Read More →
KD

Kirk Dodd

University of New South Wales
Kirk Dodd is about to submit his PhD in Creative Writing at the University of New South Wales. His dissertation examines Shakespeare’s application of Cicero’s treatise on rhetorical invention, and re-applies findings about Shakespeare’s methods of composition to a new Australian play called Bennelong, which aims to achieve a ‘Shakespearean’ epic sweep and aesthetic. He has lectured on Shakespeare and taught classes... Read More →
EG

Enza Gandolfo

Senior Lecturer, Creative Writing, Victoria University
Enza Gandolfo’s novel, Swimming (Vanark Press 2009) was shortlisted for the Barbara Jefferis Award in 2010 and the ABC Fiction Award 2008. Her other books include: Inventory: on op shops with Sue Dodd (Vulgar Press 2007), It keeps me sane: women craft wellbeing with Marty Grace (Vulgar Press 2009) and Love and Care: The Glory box tradition of Coptic Women in Australia (Vulgar Press 2011) with Marty Grace. Enza has a PhD in Creative... Read More →
PN

Pip Newling

Honorary Postdoctoral Associate, University of Wollongong
Dr Pip Newling is a Honorary Postdoctoral Research Associate at the University of Wollongong where she received her Doctor of Creative Arts (Creative Writing) in 2015. She has taught into the creative writing and professional writing programs at RMIT Melbourne, University of Wollongong and Open Universities Australia. She is a published author, her publications include a memoir Knockabout Girl (HCA 2007), and creative nonfiction essays in... Read More →


Monday November 28, 2016 2:30pm - 3:30pm
2B11 Building 2

3:30pm

Afternoon Tea :: 2B Foyer
Monday November 28, 2016 3:30pm - 4:00pm
2B: Foyer Building 2, UC

4:00pm

New Publications 1 :: 2B7

Ben Stubbs - After Dark: A nocturnal exploration of Madrid, published by Signal http://www.signalbooks.co.uk/2016/05/after-dark/

Nigel Krauth - Creative Writing and the Radical: Teaching and learning the fiction of the future, published by Multilingual Matters, http://www.multilingual-matters.com/display.asp?isb=9781783095926

Roanna Gonsalves - The Permanent Resident, published by UWAP, 
http://uwap.uwa.edu.au/products/the-permanent-resident

Sue Joseph - Behind the Text: Candid conversations with Australian creative nonfiction writers, published by Hybrid Publishers, https://www.hybridpublishers.com.au/product/behind-the-text/

Lisa Jacobson - The Asylum Poems, published by IPSI, http://recentworkpress.com/store/catalogue/the-asylum-poems/


Moderators
avatar for Paul Munden

Paul Munden

Postdoctoral Fellow (Poetry & Creative Practice), University of Canberra
Paul Munden is Postdoctoral Research Fellow (Poetry & Creative Practice) at the University of Canberra. He is General Editor of Writing in Education and Writing in Practice, both published by the National Association of Writers in Education (NAWE), of which he is Director. He has worked as conference poet for the British Council and edited Feeling the Pressure: Poetry and science of climate change. Analogue/Digital, a volume of his new and... Read More →

Speakers
RG

Roanna Gonsalves

University of New South Wales
Roanna Gonsalves is an Indian Australian writer and academic. Her series of radio documentaries entitled On the tip of a billion tongues, (Earshot, ABC RN Nov-Dec 2015) is an acerbic socio-political portrayal of contemporary India through its multilingual writers. She received the Prime Minister’s Endeavour Award 2013, and is co-founder co-editor of Southern Crossings. She teaches in the Creative Writing and Media Studies streams at the... Read More →
LJ

Lisa Jacobson

Lisa Jacobson is an award-winning poet and fiction writer. Her verse novel, The Sunlit Zone (Five Islands Press, 2012), won the 2014 Adelaide Festival John Bray Poetry Award and was shortlisted for four national awards: the 2013 Prime Minister’s Literary Awards, the 2013 Stella Prize, the 2012 Wesley Michel Wright Prize and, as a manuscript, for the 2009 Victorian Premier’s Literary Awards. Her work has been broadcast on ABC Radio... Read More →
SJ

Sue Joseph

Senior Lecturer, University of Technology Sydney
Sue Joseph (PhD) has been a journalist for more than thirty five years, working in Australia and the UK. She began working as an academic, teaching print journalism at the University of Technology Sydney in 1997. As Senior Lecturer, she now teaches creative writing, particularly creative non-fiction writing, in both undergraduate and postgraduate programs. Her research interests are around sexuality, secrets and confession, framed by the media... Read More →
NK

Nigel Krauth

Nigel Krauth is Professor of Creative Writing at Griffith University in Australia. He has published four novels, and co-authored a number of books for Young Adults. He is General Editor of TEXT: Journal of Writing and Writing Courses.
avatar for Ben Stubbs

Ben Stubbs

Lecturer, University of South Australia
Dr Ben Stubbs is a travel writer and travel writing scholar who investigates the plurality of the form: in particular Ben’s focus is on modern ethical considerations, extending the “learned judgements” in the field to explore how it can advance understanding of culture and place and to examine its growing importance within journalism. To explore this area Ben combines traditional academic output with non-traditional writing. His book... Read More →


Monday November 28, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
2B7: Lecture Theatre Building 2, UC

4:00pm

Collaboration and entanglement, renga and crochet: An object-based workshop :: 2B4

This writing workshop is grounded in the premise that collaboratorsbegin from a point of mutual entanglement, in the quantum physical sense of matter (read: the writer) attaining ontological definition at and not before the moment of union with other matter (Barad 2007). The quantum understanding of time and space in fact renders theft impossible – or, rather, it designates theft an existential condition. My boundaries as an entity come into being through my subsuming of other substances into my own definition: taking anything is taking shape.
       The workshop’s structure and process borrows (steals) two figures – one from literature, the other from science – as devices for thinking and making with. Renga, the traditional Japanese mode of collaborative poetry, provides a formal structure: participants will be asked to write poetry with each other, responding to each other’s poems, three lines followed by two lines, on and on, spontaneously and anonymously. Yet renga’s linear nature will be foregone in favour of an experiment in hyperbolic space, most easily recognised in the curvaceous, crenelated, coral-like surface that crochet brings into being (see Wertheim 2003; Crochet Coral Reef 2016). Participants will write their two- or three-line segments of poetry on either a pentagonal or a hexagonal card, which will allow ensuing three- or two-line responses to be connected to any one of that card’s 5 or 6 edges. As it goes on, the multi-authored poem elaborates itself into an inter-connective fabric with no fixed beginning or ending – an object suggestive of the light-fingered workings of entanglement.

Barad, Karen (2007). Meeting the universe halfway: Quantum physics and the entanglement of matter and meaning.

Crochet Coral Reef. Institute for Figuring. http://crochetcoralreef.org/about/index.php

Wertheim, Margaret (2007). A field guide to hyperbolic space: An exploration of the intersection of higher geometry and feminine handicraft. Los Angeles: Institute for Figuring


Speakers
avatar for Kay Are

Kay Are

Researcher, Curriculum designer, University of Melbourne
Dr Kay Are (formerly Kay Rozynski): I am a researcher in the broad field of the Environmental Humanities, interested in re-visioning the spaces of creative writing practice and pedagogy through quantum physical and new materialist precepts. Part of this project entails investigating models of experiential teaching like ‘object-based learning’, which capitalises on the sensory and embodied nature of scholarship to enhance learning. This... Read More →


Monday November 28, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
2B4 Building 2

5:00pm

Cocktail Party @ Mizzuna's
Monday November 28, 2016 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Mizzuna's: coffee shop UC Hub, lower ground
 
Tuesday, November 29
 

8:30am

Registration :: 2B2
Tuesday November 29, 2016 8:30am - 9:00am
2B2: Registration/Bookshop Building 2, UC

8:30am

Exhibitions

Caren Florance (& Angela Gardner) 
Working Papers (jostles)
Exhibiting space: Building 2, Lower level A Foyer


These are large-scale reproductions of small process moments of Working Papers, an artists' book collaboration with poet/printmaker Angela Gardner. We are exploring the sense and nonsense of composition, the immersive space of creativity. She works with her own poetry, casting and gleaning, and I work with hand-set letterpress, re-arranging her words to make new strange castings. The small moments of play, experimentation and process are caught, copied, and thrown up and out to allow quick or slow contemplation. 

Laser-printed tyvek, 6 pieces, 841 x 1189mm ea. 


Jen Webb (poems), Paul Hetherington (poems), Andrew Melrose (music)
‘he sat weeping on the shore’: remembering those who mourn  (The Odyssey 5.82)
Exhibiting space: Room 2B2

In 2001, the Norwegian container vessel MV Tampa responded to a mayday call that led to the recovery of refugees, mostly Hazaras, seeking refuge in Australia. A period of international tension followed, with Captain Arne Rinnan insisting on landing the refugees on Australian soil, and the Australian government denying the request. This event is only one instance in a history of similar events; a history that is ongoing, with no let up in sight of the flows of desperate people. The objects in the installation seek to concretise the fragility of those seeking refuge; the poetry and other textual and sonic materials will attempt to re-imagine this event, and remember things that are forgotten in official representations of the global refugee crisis.

Mixed media: ship model, Preiser figures, eggshells, folded paper: 3D installation with sonic element, and handmade poetry collection for distribution 


Lorraine Webb and Jen Webb 
Letter and Line
Exhibiting space:  Upper level, 2B7, space outside room. 

These works are part of a larger collaboration between two sisters, one a painter and the other a poet. We are trying to find ways to work together within and across our forms: ways that are neither illustration nor ekphrasis. How does colour speak to word? What is the relationship between a line of poetry and a line of paint? Our first approach to this project is to break with some formal constraints: painting not on canvas but on odd-shaped objects; writing not lineated lyric poetry but prose poetry and fragments. Next is the openness that is a mark of most creative collaborations, a moving to and fro between images, ideas, conversations, essays into objects. We are concerned more with gestures than with the mark or the gaze, and with determining how, through the movement of eye and hand and conversation, we might make letter that speaks to line, line to letter. 

Mixed media; painting on timber shapes, handmade or altered string/s, poems. 4 pieces, variable size and shape; 420mm wide x 1080 long; 1430mm wide x c.1340mm; 1725mm long x 240mm (diagonal); 40mm wide x 820mm long; with 2 – 4 poems, A5-sized. 

 


Exhibitors
avatar for Caren Florance

Caren Florance

HDR student, University of Canberra
Caren Florance is a research student and sessional design tutor in the Faculty of Arts & Design at the University of Canberra, Australia. She often works under the imprint Ampersand Duck, and is an artist whose work focuses on the book and the printed word, using traditional letterpress and bookbinding processes along with more contemporary technologies. She also teaches at the ANU School of Art and is collected by national and... Read More →
PH

Paul Hetherington

Professor of Writing, University of Canberra
Paul Hetherington is Professor of Writing at the University of Canberra and Head of the International Poetry Studies Institute (IPSI) there. He has published ten full-length collections of poetry, including Burnt Umber (UWAP, 2016) and five poetry chapbooks, most recently Earth. His collection, Six Different Windows won the 2014 Western Australian Premier’s Book Awards (poetry) and he was a finalist in the 2014 international Aesthetica... Read More →
avatar for Andrew Melrose

Andrew Melrose

Professor of Writing, University of Winchester
Andrew Melrose is Professor of Writing for Children and Creative Writing at the University of Winchester, UK. He has over 160 film, fiction, nonfiction, research, songs, poems and other writing credits, including 15 films, 4 scholarly and 30 creative books. He is also the editor of the journal Write4Children and has written a number of books, articles and book chapters on various aspects of critical and creative writing and on child-centered... Read More →
avatar for Jen Webb

Jen Webb

Distinguished Professor of Creative Practice, University of Canberra
Jen Webb is Distinguished Professor of Creative Practice at the University of Canberra, and Director of the Centre for Creative and Cultural Research. Her work includes scholarly volumes Researching Creative Writing (Frontinus, 2015) and Art and Human Rights: Contemporary Asian Contexts (with Caroline Turner; Manchester UP, 2016), and poetry volumes Watching the World (with Paul Hetherington; Blemish Books, 2015) and Stolen Stories, Borrowed... Read More →



Tuesday November 29, 2016 8:30am - 6:00pm
Around Building 2

9:00am

Voice, Identity, Dislocation :: 2B11
Subhash Jaireth:  ‘I am nothing but a human ear’: Svetlana Aleksievich and polyphony of her documentary fiction

In October 2015, Belarusian writer and journalist Svetlana Aleksievich was awarded the Nobel Prize for literature. Her series Golosa Utopii (Voices of Utopia) includes five books: The Unwomanly Face of War (Russian original published in 1985), The Last Witnesses: One Hundred Lullabies Not for Children (1985); Zinky Boys: Soviet Voices form the Afghanistan War (1989); Chernobyl Prayer (1997); and Second-Hand Time (2013). Several of these books have been turned into plays and documentary films.
      In a 1995 interview with a Russian journalist, she defined her writing project in these words:  ‘From thousands of voices, from fragments of our life and living, and from words and from that which remains beyond words, I compose not reality (because to grasp reality is impossible), but its image; an image of our time; the way we see it and the way we represent it to ourselves.’ And ‘the authenticity of what I write,’ she explains, ‘derives from the multiplicity of viewpoints it tries to encapsulate. I want my books to be read as chronicles, almost like an encyclopedia of my generation. What sort of life did the people live? What did they believe in? How did they allow themselves to kill others and how were they themselves killed?’
      There is a strong moral imperative that defines the creation of Aleksievich’s books. Behind each book she has a personal story to tell but that story is intimately tied up with a much larger story, the purpose of which is to look for answers to some fundamental human questions.
      The press release of the Swedish Academy announcing the Nobel Prize described Aleksievich’s books ‘… polyphonic, a monument to suffering and courage in our time.’ It is likely that they were called polyphonic because they reproduce testimonies of thousands of witnesses in their own voices.
      However, I find Aleksievich’s books polyphonic in the sense of the word conceptualised by Mikhail Bakhtin, the twentieth-century Russian literary philosopher. The objective of my presentation is to draw attention to the narrative style of Aleksievich’s documentary fiction. If her books are ‘authorised (authored) thefts’, the act of stealing she authors has a moral purpose: to create from thousands of voices a chorus of polyphony that can produce a heightened emotional impact.

Athina Singh: Honouring Narrative Truth

If someone says or writes something about themselves or someone, is it verifiable?  The idea of truth when dealing with narratives is problematic, because the information could be the truth in the narrator’s opinion.  However, it may in fact not be true according to independently recorded or popularly held views.  In this way, narrators can be considered unreliable. 

So, if a narrator can be unreliable, then what aspect of their narrative is of value?  Personal narratives could still be used as historical evidence. Ricks (2015) argues narratives are about meaning, not truth, and that narrative is closely tied to identity and the actions which follow.  He also asserts that narratives do not rely on truth for their success but rather on impact.  The most successful narratives are the ones which are most influential. 

This paper explores the dichotomy between truth and meaning in personal narratives.

 

Hasti Abbasi & Stephanie Green: ‘Creative Dislocation: writing and post-romantic exile’

Creative writers have long followed the tradition of romantic exile, looking inward in an attempt to construct new viewpoints through acts of imagination. Writers working in this tradition may conceive the self as transcendent and reflexive, encompassing a multiplicity of imperfect selves, which could be revisited from different standpoints based on new experiences and perceptions (Aboulafia, 2010, 74). The post-romantic writer, however, occupies a more complex and interestingly ambivalent position, which is heightened in cross-cultural contexts where writing emerges from the experience of a separation from home. For a writer producing creative work through the experience of dislocation, whether enforced or self-inflicted, regional or international, can be overwhelmingly difficult, but it can also recruit opportunities for creative capacity and expression.
      This paper will investigate the idea of the creative writer as exiled self through reflections on the traction and slippages between ideas of place, dislocation and writing. This will be explored with reference to David Malouf’s An Imaginary Life (1978). In his celebrated novella, Malouf arguably depicts exile as phenomenological prerequisite for a writer’s self-transformation, demonstrating the necessity of an exilic journey of becoming. His Ovid’s discovery is that the writer must be at the edge of things, noticing differently, available to possibility, able to embody and to channel being as metamorphoses through creative expression. Keeping Malouf’s text in view, we consider how a writer away from her place of origin can make use of dislocation as strategy and concept in a way that can fuel new creative expression.

James Vicars: Im/personating Millicent, or, Between-three

This poem sequence both re-enacts and re-frames as ‘between-three’ my recent writing, in fiction, of the life of Millicent Bryant, Australia’s first woman aviator. In so doing it inhabits Paul Ricoeur’s argument that ‘selfhood … implies otherness to such an intimate degree that one cannot be thought of without the other, instead that one passes into the other … ’ (1992: 3), while reframing the interest in ‘an other’ that Julia Kristeva draws from her reading of Hannah Arendt and expresses as ‘between-two’ (2001: 14). The poem sequence disrupts the usual repertoire of the writing of lives, first, by introducing a third party in mediating the biographic subject (a party connected personally to the subject as well as to the writer). Second, it conceives i) the writing of ‘an other’ as a faceted ‘Im/personating’ that incorporates elements of multiple selves; ii) ‘personating’ as the writing activity; and iii) the representations produced either of oneself or ‘an other’ as ‘impersonations’.

 

Moderators
avatar for Paul Munden

Paul Munden

Postdoctoral Fellow (Poetry & Creative Practice), University of Canberra
Paul Munden is Postdoctoral Research Fellow (Poetry & Creative Practice) at the University of Canberra. He is General Editor of Writing in Education and Writing in Practice, both published by the National Association of Writers in Education (NAWE), of which he is Director. He has worked as conference poet for the British Council and edited Feeling the Pressure: Poetry and science of climate change. Analogue/Digital, a volume of his new and... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Hasti Abbasi

Hasti Abbasi

Ph.D. Scholar, Griffith University
Hasti Abbasi holds a BA and an MA in English Literature. She is a sessional academic and a Ph.D. scholar in literary studies and creative writing at Griffith University.
SG

Stephanie Green

Deputy Head, School (Learning & Teaching), Griffith University
Stephanie Green is Deputy Head of School (Learning & Teaching) and Program Director for the Graduate Certificate in Creative and Professional Writing program, in the School of Humanities, Languages and Social Sciences at Griffith University. She teaches writing and cultural studies. She is a widely published essayist and short fiction writer and scholar, with work appearing in TEXT Journal, Axon and a variety of other journals.
SJ

Subhash Jaireth

University of Canberra
I am a writer, poet, essayist and translator. I am an adjunct associate professor at the CCCR, University of Canberra.
AB

Athina Bakirtzidis Singh

HDR Student, Victoria University
Athina is a PhD student at Victoria University Melbourne researching memoir, oral history and narrative.
JV

James Vicars

University of New England
Dr James Vicars has conducted extended research in the areas of biography and fictional biography as well as writing an account of the life of Australia’s first woman aviator, Millicent Bryant. A writer of nonfiction as well as fiction and poetry, he has ongoing literary interests in the contemporary novel, life writing and twentieth century English and Australian literature, and has been the recipient of fellowships from the NSW Ministry... Read More →


Tuesday November 29, 2016 9:00am - 10:00am
2B11 Building 2

9:00am

The Maiden, the Mother and the Crone :: 2A6
Kirstyn McDermott: There is always a next witch: Creative intuition and collaborative female relationships in fairy tales

If asked to think about female characters in fairy tales, a number of popular classics spring to mind: Snow White and the Wicked Queen who attempts to have the girl murdered; Cinderella who endures the bullying of her stepmother and stepsisters and is rewarded for her patience; Gretel who saves her brother by pushing a child-eating witch into an oven. The antagonism between girls/women in fairy tales has been the subject of much discussion, particularly among feminist researchers and theorists, in recent decades. However, significantly less attention has been paid to the critical absence of collaborative female relationships both in traditional fairy tales and their retellings, an absence that is reflected in wider cultural narratives and which we might well regard as an ‘unauthorised theft’. In this presentation, I explore the idea that the cognitive sciences, and schema theories in particular, may offer insights as to why these types of positive female relationships receive such scant representation in contemporary re-visioned fairy tales, and why such tales often – though by no means always – continue to replicate the common narrative dynamic of acrimony among girls/women. It is useful to consider the ways in which story schemas and person schemas might intersect in the unconscious of the creative writer to influence her intuitions – or feelings of ‘rightness’ – that accompany story creation and development. The adoption of new frameworks through which to reflexively interrogate our tacit storytelling knowledge, however, can lead to real cognitive change and subsequent advancements in our creative practice. A case study of the writing of “Burnt Sugar”, a novelette produced as part of my ongoing creative PhD research, is presented as an ‘in practice’ demonstration of the possible effects of schemas upon narrative creation.

Alyssha Katruss: Little Salem (Excerpt - first scene)

There is a stark disparity between how multicultural characters and mainstream characters are portrayed in young adult literature. Portrayals of non-mainstream groups often perpetuate harmful stereotypes, essentialist viewpoints and negative clichés that re-inforce the minority status of many groups. Multicultural literature is an effective means of countering the harmful rhetoric surrounding women and minorities that is often present in young adult literature. Multicultural literature should attempt to normalise non-mainstream groups. As such, narrative focus should be placed on aspects other than a protagonist's race, culture, ethnicity or gender. In this excerpt I have attempted to create a female multicultural protagonist that avoids these trappings. It is informed by the professional literature as well as a textual analysis of two novels with female multicultural protagonists, Born confused by Tanuja Desai Hidier (2002) and Does my head look big in this? By Randa Abdel-Fattah (2005).

Abdel-Fattah, R. (2005). Does My Head Look Big In This? . Sydney: Pan Mcmillan.

Hidier, T. D. (2002). Born Confused. London: Scolastic Ltd.

Zoe Dzunko: ‘Girls in their Summer Clothes’: Transgressive liminality and outsiderhood in Bruce Springsteen’s and Philip Levine’s female protagonists 

Philip Levine and Bruce Springsteen have regularly been credited for their delineations of ‘familiar’ and ‘authentic’ (Rauch 1988: 33) characters, whose individual struggles to negotiate their identities are exacerbated by the pressures arising from workplaces, social and familial expectations, and notions of cultural propriety. Nevertheless, in asserting that Levine and Springsteen render naturalistic characters who conform to their respective social structures, current scholarship has neglected the multitudes of liminal characters in their narratives, particularly their marginalised female protagonists. By undertaking an analysis of their songs and poems from the framework of liminality discourse, this paper demonstrates how Springsteen’s and Levine’s females are routinely situated outside of dominant, male-oriented structures, and enact the transgressive and inversive attributes of liminal identity. Extending the liminality paradigm established by anthropologists Victor Turner (1967; 1969; 1974; 1978) and Arnold van Gennep (1960) to contemporary scholars exploring liminal identities from manifold disciplines, including social anthropologist Mary Douglas (1970) and spatial scholar Doreen Massey (1994), this paper contests the evaluation that either Levine or Springsteen articulate female experience in ways material or verisimilar. Instead, it applies theoretical concepts of liminal identities, outsiders, and relationality to a close comparative reading of Levine’s verse and Springsteen’s lyrics, positing that their female characters denote an infraction of dominant male structures, while occupying a peripheral position that promotes the definition and delimiting of normative masculine identities. 

Carol Mills: The story that stole my life: a cautionary tale of storying and resistance to dominant cultural narratives

According to Reid, story structures now describe a diverse range of human activities and, “we make our word go around chasing our tales”. But, do these story structures dictate our lives or just describe them? How does the process of re-writing life (in memoir or biography) work to “reclaim” or “reshape” lived experience and, does this matter?
      In this paper I draw on the personal experience of establishing a tourist, float plane, business on Magnetic Island to investigate the relationship between dominant cultural narratives and lived experience. The establishment of the business was the subject of public debate and many of these events have been reported in courts of law, television media, newspaper articles, the internet and academic journals.
      The story reported in the press drew on two dominant, western male, cultural narratives; the “hero” and the Aussie “battler”. The framing of our personal struggles within these narratives was successful in gaining public support for our business because the audiences were able to easily identify the moral and cultural issues that underpinned them. Over time, however, they became the way in which the public related to my husband Paul and myself and our roles in the business.
      This paper explores the concept of dominant cultural narratives can operate as authorised theft by the co-opting of stories to exclude others. It argues that women can re-claim agency through re-telling their lives. It highlights the importance of writing as a resistance to dominant cultural narratives and posits that unless we tell our stories the status quo will remain the same. As Ker Conway advises, “we should pay close attention to our stories” (1999, p. 177); for it is only in the telling and re-writing of stories to claim agency, we make space to shape our lives and the lives of others.  


Moderators
JC

Jen Crawford

University of Canberra
Dr Jen Crawford is an Assistant Professor of Writing within the Centre for Creative and Cultural Research at the University of Canberra. She has also taught in New Zealand and Singapore. Her most recent collections of poetry are Lichen Loves Stone (Tinfish Press, 2015), Koel (Cordite Books, 2016) and 5,6,7,8, co-authored with Owen Bullock, Monica Carroll and Shane Strange (Recent Work Press, 2016). 

Speakers
ZD

Zoe Dzunko

Deakin University
Zoe Dzunko is a doctoral candidate in Creative Writing at Deakin University. She is co-editor of The Lifted Brow and in 2014 she founded Powder Keg Magazine, an online poetry quarterly based out of Melbourne and New York City. She is the author of numerous poetry chapbooks, most recently Selfless (TAR, 2016), and her poems have appeared in publications including The Age, Australian Book Review, Southerly, Guernica, Tin House, Sixth Finch, Prelude... Read More →
AK

Alyssha Katruss

Alyssha Katruss is a graduand from the University of Canberra. She has completed a Bachelor of Writing and been published in the UC anthology, FIRST, and The New Guard literary review.
KM

Kirstyn McDermott

HDR Student, Federation University
Kirstyn McDermott is a Ballarat-based author of two novels, Madigan Mine and Perfections, and a collection of short fiction, Caution: Contains Small Parts. For the past five years she has also been the producer and co-host of a literary critique podcast, The Writer and the Critic. Kirstyn is currently undertaking a creative PhD at Federation University with a research focus on collaborative female relationships in re-visioned fairy tales. 
CM

Carol Mills

Curtin University
I am a PhD candidate in creative writing and cultural studies at Curtin University. I am in the process of writing a memoir that explores the relationship between stories, storying and lived experience. 


Tuesday November 29, 2016 9:00am - 10:00am
2A6 Building 2, UC

9:00am

Smoke and Mirrors :: 2A12
Susannah Oddi: Skodas and spiders: Issues of frequency illusion in the creation of Gothic serial fiction.

‘Frequency illusion’ describes a situation where an individual encounters something seemingly new, and thereafter, encounters it everywhere (Zwicky 2006, p.1). This reflection on creative writing practice-based research discusses how identifying elements in filmic Gothic texts similar to my narrative led to questioning my creativity. Expressing what occurs within one’s mind during the writing process may assist in exploring cognitive approaches to creative writing research (Frieman 2014, p.127).
      Inspired by research on Victorian science and the occult, my Gothic serial fiction-in-progress merges elements of sorcery with biomedical experimentation. While writing, I noticed many of my story elements in contemporary Gothic media such as The Walking Dead (2010-2016), True Blood (2008-2014) and The Knick (2014-2016). I began to doubt the originality of my narrative choices and avoided Gothic texts for fear of encountering more of my ‘original’ ideas. I diverted my attention to Fantasy fiction and was soon confronted by giant arachnids.
      Fantasy writers appear to have no misgivings about embracing the Fantasy trope of the oversize spider, which dates back two thousand years to Ovid’s Metamorphoses (2004). The originality of each spider lies in each writer’s unique approach to its animation, be the beast be made of ice (Martin 1996), have legs like steel blades (Rothfuss 2007), have an aggressive nature (Tolkien 1954) or demonstrate mercy (Rowling 1998). These writers have inspired me to embrace the tropes of my genre and strive for originality in their reanimation. As I endeavor to renege on the narcissistic illusion that the world mirrors my creative ideas (Kirwan-Taylor 2009), I acknowledge that influences on my work extend far beyond those I had consciously recognised.

Claire Duffy: Plundering the feminine grotesque in Angela Carter’s Nights at the circus.

The dominant patriarchal literary culture names certain feminine qualities grotesque based on historical ideas of the classical masculine body. In an act of disobedience, feminist humour plunders the literary tradition that makes women disgusting and turns to the comic and regenerative power of the grotesque to claim and empower the female body. The feminist grotesque estranges the masculine bodily ideal implicit in the grotesque female form, and transports the female body from the abjected grotesque to a powerful subject. This paper will discuss the grotesque in relation to humour and the body, and particularly the female body. Revisionist feminist literature, such as Angela Carter’s Nights at the Circus, appropriates the abjected female body, the repository of this fear, and inverts the power structures that name it. The disobedient writer negates the power of the dominant authority. Humour such as irony and satire, and narrative strategies such as polyphony and metafiction fracture the single voice of authority and create new meaning. Humour alleviates the shock of the horror invested in the grotesque body and polyphony and metafiction disrupt the traditional novel form because it reminds the reader that single narrative voices are not as reliable as dominant ideology would have us believe. At the heart of Angela Carter’s text is the disruptive polyphonic fracturing of the single misogynistic voice of patriarchy. Carter appropriates the power that patriarchal laws governing femininity deploy when it names the grotesque female body.

Gabrielle Everall: I Thought I Would Die like Deleuze

A prose piece that can be performed as a reading or presented on a panel. In the piece I steal the ideas and experiences of dead philosophers and poets comparing them with my own experiences of transgression. I steal the ideas and experiences of Gilles Deleuze and Sylvia Plath. Gilles Deleuze jumped from the third floor of his apartment later dying from the injuries.  The philosopher must not be scared of death. Similarly, I had fears of jumping off the third floor of my public housing apartment. In contradiction to the philosopher I am scared of death. When the protagonist in Sylvia Plath’s Johnny Panic and the Bible of Dreams is given e.c.t Johnny Panic ‘appears in a nimbus of arc lights on the ceiling overhead’ (1977, 39). Similarly, in my pink room in Graylands a man hovers above me in a dream or flashback. The piece is creative non-fiction. It gives the account of two hospitalizations.

Alex Dunkin: Forced re-creation: overcoming the restrictions of translating the Italian cannibale genre

This creative paper explores a re-creative model for reproducing the cannibale1 genre for non-Italian readers. It outlines the necessity and outcomes of such a model, which is required to overcome the difficulties in translating the genre’s texts.

Cannibale texts are loaded with critique of Italian culture and relies heavily on assumed social and knowledge to satirise the readers’ social norms. The use of Italian dialects and colloquial phrases, regular references to Italian popular culture icons, and the presentation of the Italian concept of ‘other’ enable cannibale texts to connect with Italian readers but simultaneously make translations unapproachable for foreign audiences.

While attempting to translate these texts, the characters and dialogue become so heavily altered so as to maintain their impact that a new creative piece is produced rather than a close translation or trans-creation.

The current presentation will visually display a model for analysing and producing cannibale texts. Appropriate sections of Italian examples will be introduced and compared to a new, Australian version of cannibale literature entitled Fair Day. A translated section of text by Niccolò Ammaniti will also be shown to highlight the impact of forced re-creation on the accessibility of the text for a non-Italian reader.

1 An Italian word meaning ‘cannibal’. The genre includes the work of authors such as Niccolò Ammaniti, Aldo Nove and Isabella Santacroce.

 

Moderators
JS

Jessica Seymour

HU University of Applied Sciences
Dr Jessica Seymour is an Australian early-career researcher and lecturer at HU University of Applied Sciences, Utrecht. Her research interests include children’s and YA literature, transmedia storytelling, and popular culture. She has contributed chapters to several essay collections, which range in topic from fan studies, to Doctor Who, to ecocriticism in the works of JRR Tolkien. She is currently researching gender dynamics in the... Read More →

Speakers
CD

Claire Duffy

Deakin University
Claire Duffy is a PhD candidate at Deakin University, Geelong. She relishes the transformative power of humour in feminist literature. She views writing as a powerful tool for voicing that which is not obvious, and that which is not easy—a catalyst for transformation. Hecate, Swamp, Verandah, AntiTHESIS, In Stead, Intellectual Refuge, and Gold Dust have published her short stories.
AD

Alex Dunkin

HDR Student, University of South Australia
Alex is a researcher, journalist and writer. He is the author of novels Homebody and Coming Out Catholic. Alex is a doctoral candidate in language and linguistics working under the supervision of Dr Vincenza Tudini and Dr Ioana Petrescu. His research interests include contemporary Italian literature, exploring contemporary forms of cultural satire and audience reception of these works, and the re-creation and analysis of pulp and grotesque... Read More →
avatar for Gabrielle Everall

Gabrielle Everall

HDR Student, Melbourne University
Currently doing a Graduate diploma in Creative Writing at Melbourne Uni. Completed PhD in creative writing at The University of Western Australia. While doing the PhD she wrote her second book of poetry, Les Belles Lettres. Her first book of poetry is called Dona Juanita and the love of boys. She has been published in numerous anthologies including The Penguin Anthology of Australian Poetry, The Turnrow Anthology of Contemporary Poetry and... Read More →
avatar for Susannah Oddi

Susannah Oddi

Central Queensland University
Susannah Oddi is undertaking a PhD in creative writing at CQ University, Australia. Research interests include serial and epistolary writing, digital creative practice, and Victorian and contemporary Gothic media. Current research examines digital serial writing frameworks in comparison to Victorian serial techniques. Susannah holds a Master of Letters in Creative Writing, CQU, and a Bachelor of Information Science in Librarianship and... Read More →


Tuesday November 29, 2016 9:00am - 10:00am
2A12 Building 2, UC

9:00am

Creative Collaboration :: 2A13
Daniel Baker: Bits of Worth: Creative Remediation as Collaborative World Building 

What exists at the intersection of image and word? Where does the photographer end, the writer begin? Who owns the story? “Bits of Worth”, an artefact and rationale from and for Worth, attempts to address such questions. Combing iPhone photos and 1000 word stories, Worth is an evolving collaborative narrative by Daniel Baker and LJ Maher, skirting the borders between author and reader, lived experience and fictional reality, which, at its core, outlines a creative practice predicated on sampling, remixing, remediation, and authorised theft. Underpinned by the work of Lawrence Lessig and Henry Jenkins, Worth is positioned at a nexus of practice and theory, concerned with the historical image of the ‘original’ artist and their relationship with economic, social, cultural factors. As such, questions of reader agency, collaborative vulnerabilities, artistic originality, and creative ownership naturally arise. Fundamentally, then, “Bits of Worth”, and the larger project of which it is a part, constitute something of a refrain, the unifying theme coded into a creative dialogue between its participants where each picture and each story is both conversation and consideration.    

Eugen Bacon: That danged gizmo

‘That danged gizmo’ emerges from collaborative practice between two culturally diverse authors: a retired American living in Georgia, and an African Australian living in Melbourne. The writerly alliance sees one author focus on characterisation (‘deep south’ dialogue), and the other on literary elements (playfulness with language, style and structure), both in quests to contribute to the quality of form in the work of science fiction. Each author approaches the writing with their own knowledge, their own biases, their own craft. Together, while navigating inherent challenges in multiplicity of voice, the artists reinvent discrete ideas and creative practice into a collective storytelling. Collaborative practice is a type of theft where literature is made up, where a multiplicity is endowed with significance. The success of multi-authored work relies on the participants’ ability to negotiate their diversity, adopt each other’s creative elements and engender uniqueness to an artistic formation that is singular and seamless to the reader. In a contemporary context of digital and cyber realms, ‘That danged gizmo’ borrows from science fiction as a kind of hyperreality, where a machine destabilizes the relationship between a man and his wife. 

Penni Russon: Collaboration in the Academic Discipline of Creative Writing: A Thematic Analysis

Creative writers, with their flexible, empathetic working methods and willingness to explore new methods and new ideas, may be particularly well suited to collaborating. There is a growing trend in academia to the rewarding of funding to projects in which several disciplines combine their resources to tackle complex problems, and creative writing scholars may find themselves increasingly under pressure to explore interdisciplinary research opportunities. This thematic analysis provides a broad overview of themes in current discourse about collaborative practice in the academic discipline of creative writing. The main findings suggest that while the romantic image of the ‘solitary genius’ persists, creativity has social dimensions and creative writers can benefit from renewed engagement with their own discipline through the exposure to other disciplinary methods and working practices. New methods arise in the space between disciplines that allow for the tacit knowledge, unexpected discoveries and flexible thinking styles characteristic to creative practice. Communication is vital, and maintaining strong links with your own disciplinary community is also essential. In her presentation, Penni illustrates the main findings of her thematic analysis with examples from her own interdisciplinary collaborative project designing and developing therapeutic content for Orygen Youth Mental Health.

Rowena Lennox: Coolooloi

The etymology of the word ‘interview’ comes from Middle French s’entrevoir – to see each other. Using interviews to research relationships between dingoes and people on Fraser Island (K’gari) enables me to see the people who talk with me and to see a complex situation from different perspectives. Some of the controversies around dingoes and people on K’gari are exemplified in the case of Jennifer Parkhurst, a dingo researcher who in 2010 was prosecuted by the Queensland government for feeding dingoes and for interfering with a natural resource on K’gari.
      An interview is a staged dialogue between an interviewer and an interview participant for an audience or reader that also requires ‘a continuous negotiation of terms’ (Masschelein et al. 2014, p 25). As a form of collaborative practice an interview combines ‘preparation and anticipation’ with ‘improvisation and spontaneity’ to create something that is ‘never entirely predictable’ (Masschelein et al. 2014, p 21).
      The qualities that make an interview a collaborative work of art in its own right involve trust. They relate to an interviewer’s preparation, what an interview participant says and/or does, the ways both participants shape the live interview, and the context that an interviewer provides in the transcription and narration of the interview when it becomes text.
      This extract, ‘Coolooloi’, applies techniques of ‘repair, assemblage and re-assemblage, stitching together, a kind of bricolage or experimental tinkering’ (Gibbs 2015) to an interview with Jennifer Parkhurst. It aims to balance the documentary aspect of the situation (Gornick 2001, p 13), or the ‘problems and provocations’, with the ‘sensations, affects, intensities’ that the writing is seeking to create as its ‘mode of addressing problems’ (Grosz 2008, p 1). From this interplay emerges the story itself, which belongs to neither Parkhurst nor me. Ideally interviewer and interview participant become complementary narrators who allow the voice of the reader ‘its role in the creation of the narrative’ (Adelaide 2007).


Moderators
PH

Paul Hetherington

Professor of Writing, University of Canberra
Paul Hetherington is Professor of Writing at the University of Canberra and Head of the International Poetry Studies Institute (IPSI) there. He has published ten full-length collections of poetry, including Burnt Umber (UWAP, 2016) and five poetry chapbooks, most recently Earth. His collection, Six Different Windows won the 2014 Western Australian Premier’s Book Awards (poetry) and he was a finalist in the 2014 international Aesthetica... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Eugen Bacon

Eugen Bacon

PhD Writing, Swinburne University of Technology
Eugen M. Bacon, MA, MSc, PhD, studied at Maritime Campus, University of Greenwich, less than two minutes’ walk from The Royal Observatory of the Greenwich Meridian. A computer graduate mentally re-engineered into creative writing, Eugen has published over 100 short stories and creative articles, and has recently completed a creative non-fiction book and a literary speculative novel. Her story ‘A Puzzle Piece’ was shortlisted in the... Read More →
DB

Daniel Baker

Deakin University
Daniel Baker is a casual academic, holding a PhD in Literature from Deakin University. Focussing on the intersection of fantasy fiction, dystopian aesthetics, and formula fiction, he has published ‘History as fantasy: estranging the past in Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell’ in Otherness and ‘Why we need dragons: the progressive potential of fantasy’ in JFA, and presented at conferences from Geelong to Varanasi.  He is... Read More →
RL

Rowena Lennox

University of Technology Sydney
Rowena Lennox is a doctoral student at the University of Technology Sydney writing about dingoes and people. Her essays, fiction, memoir, poems, short articles and an interview with Bill Gammage have appeared in Hecate, Kill Your Darlings, Meanjin, New Statesman & Society, Seizure, Social Alternatives, Southerly, Sydney Morning Herald, Transnational Literature and Writers in Conversation. Her book Fighting Spirit of East Timor: the Life of... Read More →
avatar for Penni Russon

Penni Russon

University of Melbourne
Penni Russon is the author of several novels for young adults, including the multi-award winning Only Ever Always. She teaches Writing for Children and Young Adult Fiction at the University of Melbourne. She is the first creative writing PhD candidate in the Centre for Youth Mental Health at the University of Melbourne, documenting her work collaborating with visual artists, other writers, psychologists, computer developers and designers to... Read More →


Tuesday November 29, 2016 9:00am - 10:00am
2A13 Building 2, UC

9:00am

Sisters in Crime :: 2A4
Janice Simpson: In the layers of a tiger’s eye: mapping adoption stories

What began as a project examining abandonment, and possibly the role of inherited psychological trauma in explaining why many adoptees report higher than usual levels of emotional distress about trust, security and the capacity to fully engage with others, has transformed into an exploration of the meanings and symbols adoptees attach to their conception and birth. My reading of the literature revealed several things:

  1. adoption is largely silent in Australian histories and social commentaries, even those authored by feminists;
  2. adoption literature and research focuses in the main on the experiences of relinquishing mothers; and
  3. that most (if not all) adoptee stories are grief and identity stories, focusing on abandonment, trauma, loss and commodification.

Largely unexplored are the meanings attached to conception and birth in adoptees’ narratives. Making use of the significant bodies of literature about how place defines, influences and shapes peoples’ lives, and the literature that suggests ways of coming to terms with the experiences of being an outsider, I am creating a map tracing the stories of 10 adoptees from conception to their current tracks upon the Australian continent. The form of this work about place and memory and the ties that bind and identify is experimental, drawing on the practice of fictocriticism and various iterations of the essay.


Phillipa Martin: Writing a reflexive crime novel using real life and fictional adaptations

This paper looks at how crime fiction authors borrow not only from real life but from the crime fiction canon when creating new works. Drawing on academic research and other novelists’ methods, it discusses reflexivity, self-consciousness, intertextuality, embedded text and mis en abyme within the crime fiction genre and how these features relate to ‘theft’. As a hybrid paper that includes creative extracts, it also examines the author’s use of these tools, and therefore authorised and unauthorised theft, to write a PhD novel, ‘My Killer Secret’.


Leigh Redhead: The Mystery of the Stolen Sleuth – Tart Noir as Homage to Trixie Belden.

The Trixie Belden Mystery series, about a tomboyish girl detective, was published in the US from 1948-86. Trixie was very different to the more popular Nancy Drew, who was traditionally feminine, upper middle class and perfect in every way. Tart Noir is a subgenre of crime fiction that became popular in the 1990’s, and featured flawed female protagonists who were working class, operated outside of the conventional social order, and transgressed traditional gender roles. Neither ideologically sound feminist detectives, femmes fatales or scientific investigators in the tradition of Sherlock Holmes, Tart Noir protagonists displayed prodigious appetites for food, sex and danger. They solved crimes through a combination of physical action and intuition, rather than science and ratiocination. This paper will argue that these characters pay homage to girl detective Trixie Belden, using her influence to explore contemporary discourses on third wave feminism and to accurately reflect the complexity of female experience. It will also discuss the use of homage more broadly in crime fiction. How does an author decide which conventions to appropriate, and which to discard?  And how does a crime writer, particularly of detective fiction, successfully use pastiche without tipping over into parody?

 

Moderators
avatar for Jordan Williams

Jordan Williams

Associate Professor of Creative Writing, University of Canberra
Associate Professor Jordan Williams is a poet and multimedia artist who teaches literature and creative writing at the University of Canberra. She researches the materiality of poetry and the use of ‘play’ in creative writing interventions for wellbeing and health. She has led the creative writing stream of two Defence ARRTS programs designed to promote the health and wellbeing of injured and ill Defence personnel.

Speakers
PM

Phillipa Martin

University of Adelaide
Phillipa (PD) Martin is the author of five crime fiction novels featuring Aussie FBI profiler Sophie Anderson — Body Count, The Murderers’ Club, Fan Mail, The Killing Hands and Kiss of Death. These novels met with international acclaim and were published in fourteen countries. In 2011, Phillipa moved into ebooks, publishing book six in her Sophie series (a novella), a crime thriller called Hell’s Fury, a number of short stories... Read More →
LR

Leigh Redhead

University of Wollongong
Leigh Redhead is a postgraduate student at the University of Wollongong, where she is completing a PhD on Australian noir fiction and writing a ‘Hippy Noir’ set in an alternative community in rural Australia. She is also the author of Peepshow (2004), Rubdown (2005), Cherry Pie (2007) and Thrill City (2010), a crime series featuring stripper/private investigator Simone Kirsch.
JS

Janice Simpson

HDR Student, RMIT
Janice Simpson is a PhD candidate in the School of Media and Communication at RMIT, Melbourne. Her creative practice research is focused on whether the place of conception and birth is significant for adoptees. She is exploring forms of the lyric essay and where that might lead in her creation of stories about place, memory and identity. Her crime novel Murder in Mt Martha was published in 2016. She is a member of the Nonfiction Lab at RMIT... Read More →


Tuesday November 29, 2016 9:00am - 10:00am
2A4 Building 2, UC

10:00am

Grand Romanticist Larceny :: 2A4
Chantelle Bayes: Renegotiating Nature: Writing the Post-Romantic Australian City 

The legacy of Romanticism infiltrates contemporary nature writing. Without questioning the link, writers may end up reinforcing misconceptions about nature. Nature writers of the Romantic Movement, such as Thoreau, responded to the exploitation of natural resources and loss of untamed nature in an age of technological innovation but the Romantic idea of ‘nature as a redemptive force’ and the ideological separation of nature and culture remain problematic. In this paper, I explore some of Romanticism’s legacies for nature writing and how contemporary writers both draw on and resist Romantic conventions in the genre. I argue that Australian cities provide sites of resistance for writers, where they might address some of the more problematic aspects of Romantic thought. Cities are places not traditionally associated with nature writing and places where nature/culture relationships might be re-imagined, complicating notions of place, nature and the urban to arrive at new post-Romantic ways of writing nature. 

Alexandra McCallum:  Negotiating with Larceny: A 21st Century Response to the Romantics 

Negative Romantic images of urbanisation during the industrial revolution have been continually renegotiated by writers seeking a more hopeful representation of urban life. What Walter Benjamin described as “the new Romantic conception” of the cityscape and Virginia Woofe called “street haunting” transferred the sense of romantic wandering to urban environments. Key to these portrayals is a Romantic sense that the specific experiences of individuals can provide a way in to urban experience more generally; that “the illusion that one is not tethered to a single mind but … can put on briefly bodies and minds of others” (Woolfe) and indeed a semi-mystical connection with the infinite – as if instead of finding the “universe in a grain of sand” (Blake) we might find London in ‘lead pencil” (Woolfe).

While contemporary author as Orhan Pamuk, particularly in his recent novel A Strangeness in my Mind have continued this sense of the city as a site of Romance and indeed nostalgia; other authors mindful of identity and post-identity politics have questioned the appropriateness of attempting to “put on … the minds of others”; which can be seen as a kind of larceny or appropriation; even if that process is an admitted to be an “illusion” (Woolfe). Increasing understanding of the diversity of urban experience; for example between the Melbourne of Tsiolkas and Lagos of Chris Abani and have also complicated the sense that individual urban experience can be seen to representative of a larger macrocosm called The City. This paper will examine the ongoing influence of Romantic ideas on contemporary fiction and particularly; in the context of the author’s own novel manuscript – discuss possible narrative strategies for representing urban experience by recovering a sense of connectedness and the numinous advocated by the Romantics without losing the valuable insights of postcolonial and postmodern thinking.

Kirk Dodd:  The Tragicall Hiftorie of Woollarawarre Bennelong, Native Ambassador of Nova Hollandia.

This paper presents two scenes from a play that re-applies Shakespeare’s creative techniques to the creation of five act drama called: The Tragicall Hiftorie of Woollarawarre Bennelong, Native Ambassador of Nova Hollandia. By imitating Shakespeare’s style and dramaturgy, I aim to develop a ‘Shakespearean’ aesthetic that can harness something of the power and epic sweep of Shakespeare’s plays – so suited to historical drama. Where most contemporary verse dramatists tend to separate themselves from Shakespeare yet fail to hold onto strong audiences, I believe this is because audiences bring with them an inescapable expectation that equates Shakespeare with verse drama. I therefore seek to use academic rigour to discover the methods used by Shakespeare and to re-apply these to a verse drama that seeks to conform to audience expectations. Where many theatre companies tend also to corrupt Shakespeare’s texts in order to ‘reinvent’ them for the stage, my approach to creating new ‘Shakespearean’ plays allows us to celebrate what is authentic about Shakespeare’s contribution whilst simultaneously enjoying new drama. By using Shakespearean techniques – internalised soliloquys, rhetorical flair, the telescoping of chronology (to allow Pemulwuy’s war into the narrative) to name a few – these have allowed me to incorporate themes more pertinent to an Indigenous perspective than a Eurocentric one; a perspective that has been traditionally misunderstood, silenced, or written out of the historical record. The forcefulness of Shakespeare’s blank verse can therefore help generate a stronger connection between the audience and the play’s perspectives because of its structure and aural qualities, and a stronger connection can allow us to re-view the events of history more critically. I continue to submit this play to the scrutiny of consultation about its cultural content according to the protocols recommended by the Australia Council for the Arts.

Daniel Martin: A more likely outcome

In this text, the plot of Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet will be recrafted as a poem incorporating the advice given to Italian princes by Niccolò Machiavelli, the most infamous political theorist of the 16th century.
     Shakespeare’s 1597 Romeo and Juliet play was based on an Italian tale, told and retold by Italian writers, the most important of whom were Masuccio Salernitano (born in 1410), Luigi da Porto (born in 1485) and Matteo Bandello (born in 1480). Bandello’s novellas were translated into French by Pierre Boaistuau (born in 1517) and François de Belleforest (born in 1530). These French translations, in turn, were translated into English by William Painter (born 1540) and Arthur Brooke (born 1563). Literary critics agree that the primary source of inspiration for Shakespeare’s play was Brooke’s narrative poem, titled The Tragicall Historye of Romeus and Juliet, which condemns the young lovers for neglecting the authority of their parents.
     By taking a poetic leap, using fragments, insights and variations of the original Italian novellas and their translations, the poem will attempt to unveil the Italian flavour of the plot, lost behind all those rewritings, reinterpretations and well-intended but nefarious distortions which embellished the tale beyond recognition. Adding a layer of realpolitik inspired by the writings of Machiavelli, the raw political moral of the story will become apparent, almost.


Speakers
avatar for Chantelle Bayes

Chantelle Bayes

Chantelle Bayes has recently submitted her creative writing PhD exploring nature/culture relationships in fiction about cities. 
KD

Kirk Dodd

University of New South Wales
Kirk Dodd is about to submit his PhD in Creative Writing at the University of New South Wales. His dissertation examines Shakespeare’s application of Cicero’s treatise on rhetorical invention, and re-applies findings about Shakespeare’s methods of composition to a new Australian play called Bennelong, which aims to achieve a ‘Shakespearean’ epic sweep and aesthetic. He has lectured on Shakespeare and taught classes... Read More →
DM

Daniel Martin

Australian National University
Daniel Martín teaches Spanish in the School of Literature, Languages and Linguistics at the ANU. His traditional research output includes papers on the Spanish-speaking community in Australia, the politics of language teaching in Australia, and the use of technology in language teaching. His non-traditional research output includes nine books, scripts for three films, two radio plays and four theatre plays, as well as shorter works... Read More →
avatar for Alexandra McCallum

Alexandra McCallum

HDR Student, Griffith University
Alexandra McCallum is a PhD Creative writing candidate at Griffith University. She was selected for the Tin House Writers workshop in 2012, and her work for performance has appeared in Metro Arts and Darwin Festival.


Tuesday November 29, 2016 10:00am - 11:00am
2A4 Building 2, UC

10:00am

Untidy Forms :: 2A6
Paul Munden & Paul Hetherington: A Doubtful Freedom: Untidy sonnets and a contemporary poetics

What is it about the sonnet that contemporary poets feel compelled to revisit, while also deviating from its conventional attributes? Even as the sonnet was first being adapted from the Italian language into English it immediately sounded different from its Italian models. Thomas Wyatt translated Petrarch in ways that were somewhat idiosyncratic, and that suited his particular aims as a poet. He did not always write in what we now think of as conventional poetic metre or rhythms. His sonnets indicate a reluctance to find easy solutions to the problem of writing truthfully, and a recognition that poetic form often has to give way to various kinds of awkwardness if it is to register the sometimes messy travails of thought and feeling. Almost five centuries later, in the age of so-called ‘free verse’, the sonnet retains a particular allure – and continues to invite what one may call discrepancy. The ongoing experiment with the form would suggest that it has some essential relationship to certain fundamental poetic compulsions. It asserts itself persistently and is, more than a set of explicitly identifiable properties, a poetic centre of gravity that draws in even the untidiest of its relations. Two poets here investigate the untidiness of English sonnets in their earliest manifestations, and explore how – in their own recent work – they have used and adapted the form for their own purposes. 

Mags Webster: Going By ‘The Way of Dispossession’: Apophasis and Poetry

Taking the form of a lyric essay, this paper reflects on innate synergies between apophasis and the poetic process, situated within a discussion of writing and dispossession, and points out the inherent (and for a writer) apparently insurmountable irony at the heart of apophasis. Apophasis is the term for the rhetoric of negation. It is derived from the Greek words phanai “to say” and a prefix apo ‘which in this use means “away from”’(Gibbons, 2007). For many centuries, writers across the disciplines of philosophy, theology and poetry have traditionally used apophasis when attempting to “speak of” concepts or phenomena that either resist language or lie beyond human knowledge, such as the Divine. I engage with the issue of being “lost to and for words,” both from a phenomenological and poetic perspective, and I reflect on how coming up against the limits of language is, for the poet, at once desirable and problematic. Drawing from ancient and contemporary literary and theological texts such as The Mystical Theology by Pseudo-Dionsyius, the poetry of Rumi, and the writings of Alice Notley, among others, I argue that being “lost to and for words” is a form of dispossession, though of whom, and by what, is open to conjecture. I propose apophasis as a useful framework within which to survey this conundrum, describing how it offers to a writer the potential for surprising and unexpectedly rich poetic and critical outcomes.


Niloofar Fanaiyan & Shane Strange: Stealing narrative?

“Does your work straddle the line between poetry and prose? Then it’s a prose poem. Is it solidly narrative in its presentation? Then it’s probably flash fiction.” – Writer’s Relief, 2013.
      Peter Johnson suggests ‘if there is such a creature as the prose poem, […] its existence depends partly on its ability to plunder the territories of many other like genres’ (Johnson 2000). The distinction that separates prose poetry from micro-fiction or other short forms of prose often relies on the role (or ‘solidity’) of narrative. In this account, poetry is defined as an absence (or limitation) of narrative. In this presentation we will be questioning these generic distinctions by considering an example of a very short story (or microfiction) and a (lyric) poem. We will analyse each piece in terms of its narratival and lyrical qualities, identifying the techniques and degree that mark each as more or less ‘narrative’.  We suggest these different forms can ‘plunder’ the lyrical and narrative from each other and that his ‘plundering’ isn’t limited to the hazy definitions of prose poetry.



 

Moderators
SG

Stephanie Green

Deputy Head, School (Learning & Teaching), Griffith University
Stephanie Green is Deputy Head of School (Learning & Teaching) and Program Director for the Graduate Certificate in Creative and Professional Writing program, in the School of Humanities, Languages and Social Sciences at Griffith University. She teaches writing and cultural studies. She is a widely published essayist and short fiction writer and scholar, with work appearing in TEXT Journal, Axon and a variety of other journals.

Speakers
NF

Niloofar Fanaiyan

University of Canberra
Niloofar Fanaiyan has a PhD from the University of Canberra in creative writing. She is currently a Donald Horne Creative and Cultural Research Fellow at the Centre for Creative and Cultural Research, University of Canberra, where she also tutors in creative writing and literary studies. Her research interests are primarily in the fields of narrative theory, poetry, identity studies, and liminal spaces. She recently won the 2016 Canberra... Read More →
PH

Paul Hetherington

Professor of Writing, University of Canberra
Paul Hetherington is Professor of Writing at the University of Canberra and Head of the International Poetry Studies Institute (IPSI) there. He has published ten full-length collections of poetry, including Burnt Umber (UWAP, 2016) and five poetry chapbooks, most recently Earth. His collection, Six Different Windows won the 2014 Western Australian Premier’s Book Awards (poetry) and he was a finalist in the 2014 international Aesthetica... Read More →
avatar for Paul Munden

Paul Munden

Postdoctoral Fellow (Poetry & Creative Practice), University of Canberra
Paul Munden is Postdoctoral Research Fellow (Poetry & Creative Practice) at the University of Canberra. He is General Editor of Writing in Education and Writing in Practice, both published by the National Association of Writers in Education (NAWE), of which he is Director. He has worked as conference poet for the British Council and edited Feeling the Pressure: Poetry and science of climate change. Analogue/Digital, a volume of his new and... Read More →
avatar for Shane Strange

Shane Strange

Teaching Fellow, University of Canberra
Shane Strange is a doctoral candidate and Teaching Fellow in the Faculty of Arts and Design at the University of Canberra and an HDR member of the Centre for Creative and Cultural Research (CCCR). He tutors and lectures in Writing and Literary Studies. He is a writer of short fiction and creative non-fiction who has been published widely in Australia.
avatar for Mags Webster

Mags Webster

HDR Student, Murdoch University
Originally from the UK, Mags Webster is a PhD candidate at Murdoch University. She holds an MFA in Creative Writing (poetry) from City University of Hong Kong, a BA with First Class Honours in English and Creative Writing from Murdoch, and BA (Hons) in English and Drama from the University of Kent. Her poetry collection The Weather of Tongues (Sunline Press) won the Anne Elder Award in 2011. 


Tuesday November 29, 2016 10:00am - 11:00am
2A6 Building 2, UC

10:00am

Representations in Narrative :: 2A12
Natalie Kon-Yu: Authors and Others: Reviewing Culture and Limited Imagination

Since 2012 Australian organisation The Stella Prize has been counting the ratio between reviews of work by male and female writers.  The findings of Stella, like the findings of US organisation VIDA: Women in the Literary Arts have found that creative writers are much more likely to get their work reviewed if they identify as male rather than female. In 2015, I partnered with Stella to conduct their first ever Diversity Count which examines not only gender, but also race, ethnicity, sexuality, gender identity and ability of creative writers in Australia. While I am expecting that women from diverse backgrounds are reviewed (and also, probably) published less than white, heterosexual, non-disabled writers, the more interesting question for me is how are they reviewed?  Does their diversity or difference come into play in their reviews and for what purpose?  This is critically important. If we continue to fetishise or exoticise the work of certain groups within our writing community, then we keep casting these groups into the margins of our literary world at the same time as fixing the patriarchal canon at the core of what we consider to be great or universal work.  In this paper, I will speak to the findings of The Stella Diversity Count and examine the nature of the reviews received by diverse writers.  It is my contention that our reviewing culture keeps some stories at the fringes of our literary culture and this had ramifications on not only what kinds of books get published, but also limits what certain writers feel that they can write about.

Nollie Nahrung: Stealing away to belong: Piqueering The Velveteen Rabbit

To piqueer (also pickeer) means ‘to pillage, to make a flying skirmish’ (Walker & Smart 1836, pp. 468; 464). In this paper, this archaic word is taken to reference Cixous’ employment of the double meaning of the French verb voler (to steal and to fly) in relation to women’s writing, yet extend this productive duality to specifically address an act of queer literary “theft” and “flight”. This act is a piqueering of the children’s book, The Velveteen Rabbit, which uses remediation and digital collage techniques to make a “new” creative work from the source text. Comprising part of this paper, this work – The idea of queer: The Velveteen Rabbit remix – is used to explore connections between theft and collage in relation to cultural (re)production and queer belonging.

Alayna Cole: 

Moving Beyond the Self: How Blog Posts Can Inspire Narratives of Representation

‘Narratives of representation’ allow readers to see their own identities reflected within texts they access and can increase empathy by exposing readers to varied experiences (Smolkin & Young 2011: 217). Researching personal topics has traditionally relied on approaches that require direct contact between a researcher (writer) and a participant (Wilkinson & Thelwall 2011: 387), which can be time-consuming and expensive. The expression of personal experiences through autoethnography has also been adopted in the creation of these narratives as an alternative approach, but can limit the conclusions presented due to the restricted scope of experiences that can be explored (Méndez 2013). Critical analysis of blog posts offers new possibilities, allowing writers to explore how members of a social group candidly discuss their identities and the issues they face with each other and external parties. Accessing blog posts written by members of the queer community has allowed me to create specific narratives of representation underpinned by accurate and authentic depictions, ensuring readers are exposed to diverse perspectives that reflect reality. This paper explores the ways blog posts written by the queer community have influenced my depiction of queer identity in creative works and exegetical writing by inspiring and informing the exploration of issues such as mislabelling, stereotyping, discrimination, and fear.


Moderators
avatar for Caren Florance

Caren Florance

HDR student, University of Canberra
Caren Florance is a research student and sessional design tutor in the Faculty of Arts & Design at the University of Canberra, Australia. She often works under the imprint Ampersand Duck, and is an artist whose work focuses on the book and the printed word, using traditional letterpress and bookbinding processes along with more contemporary technologies. She also teaches at the ANU School of Art and is collected by national and... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Alayna Cole

Alayna Cole

DCA candidate / sessional lecturer, University of the Sunshine Coast
Alayna Cole is a doctoral candidate in Creative Arts (Creative Writing) and a lecturer in Serious Games at the University of the Sunshine Coast. She has broad research interests, but she is primarily focused on creating and analysing narratives that improve diverse representation, particularly of gender and sexuality. Her doctoral thesis—entitled Queerly Ever After—comprises a collection of reimagined fairy tales that seek to incorporate... Read More →
NK

Natalie Kon-Yu

Victoria University
Natalie Kon-yu is a writer, academic and a commissioning editor of both Just between Us: Australian Writers Tell the Truth about Female Friendship (2013) and Mothers and Others: Why not all Women are Mothers and not all Mothers are the Same (2015). She is a lecturer at Victoria University where she is currently researching gender bias in the literary prize culture, and her critical and creative work has been published nationally and... Read More →
NN

Nollie Nahrung

Southern Cross University
Nollie Nahrung lives in the Northern Rivers of New South Wales. She is a PhD candidate in the School of Arts and Social Sciences at Southern Cross University (SCU) and her thesis explores relationship anarchy using interdisciplinary approaches. Nollie holds a Bachelor of Arts Degree with First Class Honours from SCU and a Bachelor of Multimedia Studies with Distinction from Central Queensland University. She is a university medalist.


Tuesday November 29, 2016 10:00am - 11:00am
2A12 Building 2, UC

10:00am

Writing Under the Influence :: 2A13
Jen Webb & Monica Carroll: The Teacher-Effect: Poets who took, borrowed and stole from teachers of influence

In Charlotte Wood’s The Writing Room, Wayne Macauley says, he began ‘writing under the influence of a teacher’ (2016). His teacher, he says, ‘energised whatever was in my head’. Through an ARC Discovery Project (DP130100402) investigating creativity, we asked 75 practicing poets across nine English-speaking nations about their first encounter with poetry. Our quantitative data shows a high percentage of poets were ‘switched on’ to poetry by a teacher. In this paper we explore the metaphor of genetic coding and the relationship between poet and teacher as an impetus for ‘switching on’ the poet. Mere ‘exposure’ in the classroom is not enough. The origin story of poets is a story of relationship where that which is taken, borrowed or, in some cases, stolen has a life-shaping effect.
Wood, Charlotte 2016. The Writing Room. Sydney: Allen and Unwin.


Rosey Chang: Observing the ‘black cloud’: Applying mindfulness approaches to anxieties in creative writing practice

Creative writers may experience anxieties in relation to their creative practice, often describing these experiences as stressful and inhibiting. At the same time, a growing body of literature shows that mindfulness approaches can be beneficial when applied to experiences of anxieties.
      This paper draws from multiple disciplines to investigate the question: “How does the relevant literature support the ways in which a mindfulness-based approach might assist creative writers to approach anxieties in relation to their creative practice?”
      In terms of method, I have examined literature across relevant knowledge fields including medical science, health science and psychology. The findings shed light on how a mindfulness approach might influence the physiological response to anxiety. A key concept is that the body does not, in fact, possess an ‘anxiety response’, when facing a threat that causes anxiety. Instead, the body often responds with a fear related fight-or-flight response. In this paper I argue that mindfulness approaches can assist creative writers who experience anxieties in creative practice by powerfully enabling an alternative response to the fight-or-flight response.
      This paper provides a new lens to the perennial issue of anxieties in creative writing practice by drawing on inter-disciplinarity, while remaining strongly grounded in the home discipline of creative writing studies. The findings are significant because – with the exception of composition students in the context of contemplative pedagogy, or first-person accounts by professional writers who meditate – there has been very little attention focused on adult creative writers and mindfulness approaches in relation to anxieties.

Kay Are: ‘Collaboration and entanglement, renga and crochet’

This paper, connected to yesterday's workshop, is grounded in the premise that collaborators begin from a point of mutual entanglement, in the quantum physical sense of matter (read: the writer) attaining ontological definition at and not before the moment of union with other matter (Barad 2007). The quantum understanding of time and space in fact renders theft impossible – or, rather, it designates theft an existential condition. My boundaries as an entity come into being through my subsuming of other substances into my own definition: taking anything is taking shape.
     The installation's structure and process borrows (steals) two figures – one from literature, the other from science – as devices for thinking and making with. Renga, the traditional Japanese mode of collaborative poetry, provides a formal structure: participants will be asked to write poetry with each other, responding to each other’s poems, three lines followed by two lines, on and on, spontaneously and anonymously. Yet renga’s linear nature will be foregone in favour of an experiment in hyperbolic space, most easily recognised in the curvaceous, crenelated, coral-like surface that crochet brings into being (see Wertheim 2003; Crochet Coral Reef 2016). Participants will write their two- or three-line segments of poetry on either a pentagonal or a hexagonal card, which will allow ensuing three- or two-line responses to be connected to any one of that card’s 5 or 6 edges. As it goes on, the multi-authored poem elaborates itself into an inter-connective fabric with no fixed beginning or ending – an object suggestive of the light-fingered workings of entanglement.

Angela Savage: (Un)authorised theft: Using real life to inform fiction

Writers commonly steal from the lives of those around us as fodder for our fiction, though we are not subject to external oversight regarding the ethics of such practice. It is left up to individual writers to set our own ethical standards. Does poetic licence exempt us from the ordinary moral rules of human engagement? In this paper, I provide examples of different ways in which I have stolen from the lives of others to lend authenticity and resonance to my current work in progress PhD novel, Mother of Pearl. I discuss the ethical issues raised by my practice, and concur with guidelines proposed by Claudia Mills to protect privacy and confidentiality, and minimise the harm caused by using people I know as a resource for my fiction. However, when it comes to theft from the lives of distant others—in my case, writing in the narrative voice of a Thai woman—I argue that a different approach is needed, suggesting that Kwame Anthony Appiah’s concept of the respectful cross-cultural conversation at the heart of cosmopolitanism provides a way forward. Significantly, I argue that metaphorical conversation between the writer and their research, as well as literal conversation between the author/text and representatives of the communities we write about, are essential elements in an ethical practice for fiction writing across boundaries in a globalised world.


Moderators
AP

Antonia Pont

Senior Lecturer, Deakin University
Antonia Pont writes poetry, short fiction and nonfiction, and novel-length prose works. Her writing has appeared in Meanjin, Cordite, Antic Magazine, Newcastle Poetry Prize Anthology, Rabbit, TEXT, Gargouille, Axon, as well as international anthologies. She researches ontologies of creativity, practising theory and change, is Senior Lecturer in Writing & Literature at Deakin University... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Kay Are

Kay Are

Researcher, Curriculum designer, University of Melbourne
Dr Kay Are (formerly Kay Rozynski): I am a researcher in the broad field of the Environmental Humanities, interested in re-visioning the spaces of creative writing practice and pedagogy through quantum physical and new materialist precepts. Part of this project entails investigating models of experiential teaching like ‘object-based learning’, which capitalises on the sensory and embodied nature of scholarship to enhance learning. This... Read More →
MC

Monica Carroll

University of Canberra
Monica Carroll is a researcher at the University of Canberra. Her academic publications include papers on space and writing. Her research interests include phenomenology, poetry and empathy. Her widely published prose and poetry has won numerous national and international awards.
RC

Rosey Chang

HDR Student, Monash University
Rosey Chang is a writer, educator and academic developer. She is a PhD candidate in creative writing at Monash University. Her research investigates anxieties in creative writing practice through the lens of mindfulness with a special interest in Zen arts practice. She is also developing a middle-grade children’s novel set in medieval Japan that explores mindfulness themes. Rosey’s work has been published in TEXT, The Victorian... Read More →
avatar for Angela Savage

Angela Savage

HDR Student, Monash University
Angela Savage is an award winning Melbourne writer, who has lived and travelled extensively in Asia. Her first novel, Behind the Night Bazaar (Text, 2006), won the 2004 Victorian Premier's Literary Award for an unpublished manuscript. All three of her Jayne Keeney PI novels were shortlisted for Ned Kelly Awards, The Dying Beach also shortlisted for the 2014 Davitt Award. She won the 2011 Scarlett Stiletto Award for her short story, ‘The... Read More →
avatar for Jen Webb

Jen Webb

Distinguished Professor of Creative Practice, University of Canberra
Jen Webb is Distinguished Professor of Creative Practice at the University of Canberra, and Director of the Centre for Creative and Cultural Research. Her work includes scholarly volumes Researching Creative Writing (Frontinus, 2015) and Art and Human Rights: Contemporary Asian Contexts (with Caroline Turner; Manchester UP, 2016), and poetry volumes Watching the World (with Paul Hetherington; Blemish Books, 2015) and Stolen Stories, Borrowed... Read More →


Tuesday November 29, 2016 10:00am - 11:00am
2A13 Building 2, UC

10:00am

Thievery and Influence in Young Adult Fiction :: 2A14
Denise Beckton: 

Thievery and influence in young adult fiction

Young Adult fiction is a constantly evolving genre. It draws inspiration from other fiction, from popular culture, from publishers and theorists, and even from itself. We will explore, as best we can, some of the ways that YA fiction collaborates with its influences – whether by writing back to a publishing trend, or by writing back to its fans, or by writing back to the worlds created by a particular author – and how these collaborations affect theorists’ understanding of the genre overall. ‘Stealing the limelight: the effect of global Young Adult bestselling fiction’. This research, drawn from Beckton’s masters thesis, exposes the strategies and behaviours that facilitate, hasten and heighten changes in the YA market. This can lead to narrowed reading, writing and publishing opportunities within the genre.


Lauren Briggs: Stealing from Within: Internal intertextuality in the work of Fiona Wood

This conference asks, “Where do we find the sources for our ideas, our language, our stories?” For award winning Australian Young Adult fiction author Fiona Wood, the source is, in part, her own work.
     Wood’s books contain a range of intertextual references to external sources, including direct references to novels such as Jayne Eyre, plays, movies, magazines, as well as thematic allusions and imitations of classic fairytale narratives.
      Additionally Wood references, reuses, or steals characters from her own stories, promoting minor characters to protagonist status, and relegating them again. She also references her earlier narratives in her later works. In doing this across her books, Six Impossible Things (2010), Wildlife (2013), and Cloudwish (2015) Wood creates a trilogy or series, of sorts, where characters are related through their educational experience and relationships.
      The fictional world inhabited by the characters continues as they grow and age across the books, allowing Wood to continually explore the stories and lives of her characters who are diverse culturally and socially, and yet also closely connected.
      This paper suggests that Wood constructs the storyworld in these books in ways that support revisiting them intertextually, somewhat authorising Wood to steal from her own stories. This argument will be developed through analysis of the texts using two of Gerard Genette’s five types of transtextuality, intertextuality and hypertextuality (as detailed in Genette’s, Palimpsests: Literature in the Second Degree(1997)), to explore the use of these transtextual elements in the storyworld.

Jessica Seymour: Representations of fanfiction in the works of Rainbow Rowell; ‘Borrowing… Repurposing. Remixing. Sampling’

Fanfiction is the realm of young people – usually young women. It offers a space for them to explore sexuality, relationship dynamics, notions of power, and agency in a safe space with recognisable characters and situations. Fanfiction tropes have occasionally found their way into published works, and some contemporary published authors began their careers as young fanfiction writers, but the fanfiction writing community has often drawn derision in popular culture. This paper examines the representation of fanfiction tropes and authors in the works of Rainbow Rowell, and argues that Rowell’s books Fangirl and Carry On model a more positive and inclusive approach to representing fanfiction. While Fangirl celebrates the work of fanfiction authors by exploring the positive effects of fanfiction writing practice, the supportive community which surrounds these authors, and the socio-cultural benefits to exploring sexuality and relationship dynamics through vicarious experience, Carry On offers a practical demonstration and model of fanfiction in action. Rowell’s works offer a metatextual encounter with fanfiction writing and community which celebrates the practice rather than condemning it. 

Moderators
AE

Anthony Eaton

Dr Anthony Eaton has been writing professionally since the late -1990s and is the author of 11 novels for children, young adults, and adults. He is president of the Australasian Children’s Literature Association for Research (ACLAR), and is Associate Professor of Creative Writing at the University of Canberra where he is researching the changing nature of young adult fiction in Australia, and the lived experience of creative practitioners... Read More →

Speakers
DB

Denise Beckton

Central Queensland University
With a background in public health and education, Denise Beckton is a Lecturer in Creative Industries at Central Queensland University in Noosa, Queensland. Denise has recently completed a research higher degree in Creative Industries (creative writing), which comprised the writing of a Young Adult novel and a related dissertation that explores the construction and use of invented languages in fiction. Denise is the recipient of multiple awards... Read More →
avatar for Lauren Briggs

Lauren Briggs

HDR Student, University of Canberra
Lauren Briggs is a Phd candidate and sessional tutor at the University of Canberra. Her research is looking at how writers use intertextuality in Australian young adult fiction and her interests include young adult fiction, Australian fiction, adaptation studies, and intertextuality.
JS

Jessica Seymour

HU University of Applied Sciences
Dr Jessica Seymour is an Australian early-career researcher and lecturer at HU University of Applied Sciences, Utrecht. Her research interests include children’s and YA literature, transmedia storytelling, and popular culture. She has contributed chapters to several essay collections, which range in topic from fan studies, to Doctor Who, to ecocriticism in the works of JRR Tolkien. She is currently researching gender dynamics in the... Read More →


Tuesday November 29, 2016 10:00am - 11:00am
2A14 Building 2, UC

11:00am

Morning Tea :: 2B Foyer
Tuesday November 29, 2016 11:00am - 11:30am
2B: Foyer Building 2, UC

11:30am

AAWP AGM and Announcement of Prizes :: 2B7
The AAWP Annual General Meeting followed by the announcement and awarding of the Emerging Writers Prize and the Chapter One Prize.


Moderators
avatar for Lynda Hawryluk

Lynda Hawryluk

Course Coordinator, Creative Writing, SCU
Dr Lynda Hawryluk is a Senior Lecturer in Writing at Southern Cross University where she is the Course Coordinator of the Associate Degree of Creative Writing. Lynda lectures in Writing units and supervises Honours, Masters and PhD students. An experienced writing workshop facilitator, Lynda has also presented workshops for community and writing groups in Australia and Canada. She is the President and Chair of the Australasian Association of... Read More →
JP

Julia Prendergast

Writer
Julia Prendergast has a PhD in Writing and Literature. Julia is a short fiction addict. Her stories have been longlisted, shortlisted and published: Lightship Anthology 2 (UK), Glimmer Train (US), TEXT (AU) Séan Ó Faoláin Competition, (IE), Review of Australian Fiction, Australian Book Review, Elizabeth Jolley Prize, Josephine Ulrick Prize (AU). Julia's theoretical work has been published: TEXT... Read More →

Tuesday November 29, 2016 11:30am - 12:30pm
2B7: Lecture Theatre Building 2, UC

12:30pm

Lunch :: 2B Foyer
Tuesday November 29, 2016 12:30pm - 1:30pm
2B: Foyer Building 2, UC

1:30pm

Borrowing From the Past :: 2A4
Lynnette Lounsbury: Finding Kerouac

‘Finding Kerouac’ represents a response to the theme of the conference  - Authorised Theft – through two extracts from the novel We Ate the Road like Vultures. The novel is a revisionist history of the later life of writer Jack Kerouac and explores the ways in which fans respond to the writers they love, and the way their language in turn is an evolution, a reflection and a ‘theft’ of the works of these writers. Sixteen-year-old Lulu inserts herself into the world that she has read about, unmasking Kerouac in his hiding place and becoming a part of the imagined life of the writer she admires. The novel follows her journey to find Kerouac living out his days incognito in Mexico, and then to find herself, by convincing him to go ‘on the road’ one last time. The narrative demonstrates the hyper-real nature of revised and imagined history, and is at once real and imagined. Reality and identity is examined as something fluid - something that can change according to the belief surrounding it - with religion as the metaphorical backdrop. ‘Finding Kerouac’ presents two sections of the first chapter of the novel describing the search for, and discovery of Kerouac and the ways in which the believable are stretched to accommodate this fantastical re-versioning of events. Lulu discovers the writer’s house in Mexico but finds that her discovery of Kerouac’s hiding place triggers a violent episode that resulting in a death. The second extract describes her realization that Neal Cassady too, is alive and living with Jack in the old hacienda – a verbal war that shows both her love for Kerouac’s words and her frustration with them. 

Olga Walker: Fallen Angels: The Lost Warriors of the 1916 Proclamation

The scope of Irish Studies research is a vast cornucopia of stereotypes, topics, debates, discourses and fissures where writing as an act of homage and as an act of theft can occur. Irish migration narratives are not an unknown field of scholarly study and research into women’s lived experiences is a matter of continuing interest.

This paper argues that, despite some of the Irish official documentation about female Irish migrants (which can be seen as an act of theft), the POBLACHT NA hÉIREANN (Irish Proclamation) is one document that can be seen as an act of homage. Viewing POBLACHT NA hÉIREANN in this way allows my project to (re)locate Irish women (including Irish female migrants) within the ‘Ireland’ of promised equal rights and equal opportunities for all its citizens. To do this, my research project recognises, and will call for the recognition of the sacrifices Irish female migrants made, big or small, willingly or unwillingly, for the ‘Ireland’ that followed enactment of the 1937 Irish Constitution, and the continuing struggle for gender equality in Ireland. Gender equality was promised in 1916 and 1922, but in practice it never happened; the earlier ambitious promises were progressively watered down by the time of the 1937 Constitution. It is in this intersection between the many questions that remain unanswered about Irish women and Irish female migrants, and the call to recognise their contribution to Ireland, where the magic and the ‘once upon-a-times’ can begin.

 

Catherine Padmore: Resisting Hilliard: Constructing historical fiction by reading against the grain

The first English-born artist to excel at miniature painting was Nicholas Hilliard (1547-1619), who trained as a goldsmith before going on to paint Elizabeth I and her successor, James. Hilliard documented his process and influences in his unpublished Arte of Limning. This manuscript, according to Thornton and Cain, combines “more formal and rhetorical passages with personal observations, outbursts and what amount to grumblings on subjects where his feelings are roused or his professional pride is touched” (1992: 11). What emerges from the manuscript are resonant fragments of Hilliard’s inner world, as experienced in his fifties. Writers developing novels based on Hilliard’s life might take these at face value, assuming a close correlation between what he felt and what he wrote. With respectful nods to founding feminist critics Judith Fetterley and Adrienne Rich, I have chosen to read Hilliard’s treatise against the grain when constructing my own narrative about his life. I am more interested in how his statements might function as distractions or dissemblings. What might this document suggest about his younger self? What might it hide? The lacuna at the centre of his text is striking—Hilliard does not reveal how he made the shift from goldsmith to painter, nor who taught him the closely guarded secrets of the illuminator’s workshop. The name most compelling in its omission is Levina Teerlinc (1515?-1576), a Flemish woman appointed as royal paintrix to the English court from Henry VIII to Elizabeth and thought by many to be the most likely candidate for the transmission of these techniques. She remains largely unknown outside of art-history circles. This paper examines Hilliard’s manuscript for evidence of a working relationship between the two, producing a resistant reading which argues for his debt to a marginalised female painter.

Thornton, R.K.R. and Cain, T.G.S. 1992 ‘Introduction’ to Hilliard, N, The Arte of Limning. Carcanet Press, Manchester, pp, 9-38.

Melanie Myers: Tales of a Garrison Town: Writing into the ‘Feminine Ensemble’ Tradition of the Home-Front Novel

William Hatherell (2007) categorises the ‘home-front novel’ of World War II as a subgenre of Australian War literature. More specifically, within this subgenre, are what Hatherell calls the ‘ensemble novels’. These include the classic Come in Spinner (1951) by Dymphna Cusack and Florence James, Soldiers’ Women (1961) by Xavier Herbert, and the Brisbane-set Time Out for Living (1995) by Estelle Pinney. The ‘ensemble’ in each case is comprised of a small group of white, heterosexual women, whose differences – and intertwining plot trajectories – are contrasted and played out along the lines age, class and marital status. The intention of each novel is to detail, according to the authors’ gendered standpoints, the social disruption of an Australian city in wartime with an emphasis on the impact brought about by the ‘friendly invasion’ of American servicemen during World War II. Tales of a Garrison Town is a self-conscious work of historical fiction – or what Hutcheon dubbed, historiographic metafiction –which acknowledges, through intertextual references (both overt and subtle), the home-front ensemble novel as its precedent. Beginning with Taylor’s (1983: 6) premise that, ‘In no other Australian city [Brisbane] was the reaction to the uncontrollable forces and rapid impact of the invasion of the American forces as completely and keenly felt’, TOAGT re-imagines the Brisbane home front as a site of historical and narrative contention, entwining themes of gendered resistance, place, collective memory, nostalgia, and the connection of history to the literary (Hutcheon 1995). In this paper, I use a practice-led methodology to reflect on the process of (ironically) embedding and referring to the historical texts (that is, newspaper articles, oral histories, photographs, ephemera, music, artefacts, memoir, popular histories and academic research), while also responding and paying homage to the narrative tradition of the home-front ‘feminine ensemble’ novel. 


Moderators
avatar for Jordan Williams

Jordan Williams

Associate Professor of Creative Writing, University of Canberra
Associate Professor Jordan Williams is a poet and multimedia artist who teaches literature and creative writing at the University of Canberra. She researches the materiality of poetry and the use of ‘play’ in creative writing interventions for wellbeing and health. She has led the creative writing stream of two Defence ARRTS programs designed to promote the health and wellbeing of injured and ill Defence personnel.

Speakers
LL

Lynnette Lounsbury

Avondale College of Higher Education
Lynnette Lounsbury is a lecturer in Communication and Ancient History, and a creative arts practitioner at Avondale College of Higher Education. She is the author of the young adult novel Afterworld (Allen & Unwin, 2014) and her second novel We ate the Road like Vultures (Inkerman & Blunt) was published in April 2016. Finding Kerouac is an extract from that novel.
avatar for Melanie Myers

Melanie Myers

HDR Student; Sessional lecturer/tutor, University of the Sunshine Coast
Melanie is a doctoral candidate at the University of the Sunshine Coast where she teaches Creative Writing and Drama. Her doctoral thesis, Tales of a Garrison Town, is an examination of, and a creative response to, the tropes, themes and gendered discourses of the Australian home-front novel of World War II. She has been published in Kill Your Darlings, Arena Magazine, Overland [online], WQ Magazine and Hecate. She has been shortlisted for the... Read More →
CP

Catherine Padmore

La Trobe University
Dr Catherine Padmore has taught at La Trobe University since 2005. Her novel, Sibyl’s Cave (Allen and Unwin, 2004) was shortlisted for The Australian/Vogel Award and commended in the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize. Catherine has been awarded two retreat fellowships at Varuna. Her creative works are published in Island, The Journal of Australian Writers and Writing, The Big Issue, The Australian, Dotlit and Antithesis, and in the... Read More →
OW

Olga Walker

HDR Student, University of Canberra
Following a career in financial management in the private sector, and as a financial analyst with the Department of Defence, Olga Walker is now a PhD Candidate with the University of Canberra. She graduated with a BA Arts (Community, Culture and Environment), and has undertaken the following postgraduate studies: Grad.Cert. (Public Sector Management); Grad. Dip. Arts (English), Grad. Dip. Arts (Research), and an MA (English).


Tuesday November 29, 2016 1:30pm - 2:30pm
2A4 Building 2, UC

1:30pm

The Author as Thief :: 2A6
Lucy Neave: Solitary literary writers or partners-in-crime? The collaborative and individual writing practices of Canberra novelists Mark Henshaw and John Clanchy 

This paper contributes to recent scholarship on literary networks and collaborative practice by exploring the literary relationship between two Canberra authors, John Clanchy and Mark Henshaw. John Clanchy has written several works of literary fiction, for example, Vincenzo’s Garden (UQP, 2005) and Her Father’s Daughter (UQP, 2008), as has Mark Henshaw (Out of the Line of Fire, 1988; The Snow Kimono, 2014). Together, Clanchy and Henshaw have published crime fiction, writing as J.M. Calder.
     In the following, I discuss an interview I conducted with Clanchy and Henshaw in the context of recent scholarship on literary networks and ‘communities of practice’, a term borrowed from sociology and used by Anitra Nelson and Catherine Cole to describe groups of writers who support each other and provide feedback on each other’s work. As part of our discussion, Clanchy and Henshaw describe the differences between writing a novel as sole authors, and writing crime fiction together. They describe the extent to which working together on If God Sleeps (Penguin, 1997) and Hope to Die (Penguin, 2007) has inflected their writing practices. The paper pays particular attention to the cultural contexts in which Clanchy and Henshaw work, and the extent to which they revise their fiction. It compares their statements about their process with Hannah Sullivan’s contention in The Work of Revision (2013) that the current emphasis on revision in literary fiction is social and cultural, and tied to modernism and technology.

Nat Texler: Lifeline - An Extract

This paper details how three previous scripts written by a practitioner influenced the creation of anew work titled Lifeline. The aim of this paper is to show how ideas and concepts can evolve not justwithin a singular project, but through various iterations from the same creator. This is achieved bywhat Brad Haseman refers to as an Artistic Audit – the examination of previous work in order toprovide contextualisation for a practitioner within their field.
The plays chosen are Slumway (2010), Tick-Tock (2011), and Pistol (2011) – three projects that thewriter has worked on prior to beginning the development of Lifeline. This paper provides a quicksynopsis of each project, before detailing themes and concepts that are further evolved throughpractice and seen in Lifeline. Attempting to understand the constant evolution and modification ofcore issues and themes allows creative practitioners insight into the importance of new work, andwhere it fits within the context of their field, as well as creating a better sense of an artists work as awhole.


Cheryl Threadgold: Literary Larceny: Writing as Theft

PhD candidature research and writing has introduced me to literary larceny as a perpetrator. My historical creative non-fiction arts-based project titled Victorian Community Theatre: an analysis of the history and culture of Victoria’s non-professional performing arts sector, has assumed the role of ‘Mr Big’, urging my authorised theft of knowledge and recollections from over one hundred non-professional theatre companies across regional and suburban Victoria. I case victims by sending pre-interview questions, luring them to hand over their valuable goods. No need for microphone or camera accomplices, just the good old reliable tools of pen, paper and a combination of shorthand and longhand writing, to ensure safekeeping of this precious heist of historic and socio-cultural knowledge. Surprisingly, all victims sign a consent form authorising this literary larceny! Eventually all stolen goods will be returned to their owners after writing their stories, and shared with a broad readership community. So, who says ‘crime doesn’t pay’? The non-professional theatrical arts sector has an abundant treasure of knowledge and recollections hidden in Victorian communities, awaiting discovery by authorised theft.

Barrie Sherwood: Grey Area
A quasi-fictional narrative in which someone like the author makes a peripatetic journey around Norwich in search of traces of WG Sebald several years after his death, taking photographs and thinking about the boundaries between the living and the dead that Sebald's books (some of the most extraordinary ghost stories of recent times) blurred, but not finding anything of consequence -- nothing that the narrator wants to qualify as "research" in the end -- before taking his leave and finding some solace in a quote of Sebald's: “I am not seeking an answer. I just want to say, ‘This is very odd, indeed.’” 

Moderators
SC

Shady Cosgrove

Associate Professor, University of Wollongong
Shady Cosgrove is an Associate Professor in Creative Writing at the University of Wollongong. Her books include What the Ground Can’t Hold (Picador, 2013) and She Played Elvis (Allen and Unwin, 2009), which was shortlisted for the Australian Vogel Prize. Her shorter works have appeared in Southerly, Overland, Antipodes and Best Australian Stories.

Speakers
LN

Lucy Neave

Australian National University
Lucy Neave is the author of Who We Were (Melbourne: Text, 2013) and scholarship on literary networks, fiction writing process and revision. She is the recipient of an Australia Council for the Arts Grant, a second book fellowship at Varuna: The National Writers’ House, and a Fulbright Scholarship. She is a lecturer in writing at the Australian National University.  
avatar for Barrie Sherwood

Barrie Sherwood

Barrie Sherwood is Assistant Professor of English at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. He has written short fiction for various journals, non-fiction, and two novels (The Pillow Book of Lady Kasa, DC Books, Montreal and Escape from Amsterdam, Granta Books, UK; St Martins Press, USA). He is currently at work on a third novel.
NT

Nat Texler

University of South Australia
Currently based at the University of South Australia, Nat Texler is an emerging researcher in the field of creative writing, focussing on playwrighting and practice as research. Most recently, she has produced her short play Lifeline in the 2016 Adelaide Fringe Festival and is currently working on an accompanying exegesis for submission in 2017.
avatar for Cheryl Threadgold

Cheryl Threadgold

Swinburne University of Technology
Cheryl Threadgold is a second year PhD research candidate at Swinburne University of Technology. Her PhD research project is inspired by past active involvement in Victoria’s non-professional theatrical arts sector, and as honorary Local Theatre writer for the Melbourne Observer newspaper. Cheryl convenes the Bayside U3A Writers’ Discussion Group, encouraging mature-age writers to explore their full creative potential, and has written seven... Read More →


Tuesday November 29, 2016 1:30pm - 2:30pm
2A6 Building 2, UC

1:30pm

Process and Transformation :: 2A12
Monica Carroll & Donna Hanson: 

Election Triptych

Using the found poetry of on-line forums, we create permanent compositions from an ephemeral stream of words and words as image. These works explore the phenomenological capacities of the page and seek techniques that build poem-compositions that account for space as much as line to give expression to the idea that a poem is ‘felt’ rather than ‘read’.

Caitlin Maling: Spending a Month with William Stafford in Oregon

This creative research project engages with the idea of process-driven writing as a potential method for ecopoetics. Such a method draws of Heideggerian ideas of ‘dwelling’ to propose that through daily directed engagement with the immediate environment the poet can in some way be permitted access to the ‘four-fold’ of things.  Adding an additional layer of complexity to the process, the composition is created in concert with the creative and critical work of the great mid-west poet William Stafford. Stafford pioneered ideas of process-driven writing before the development of ecocriticism. Heavily identified with the pacific north west, his work Averill (2001: 279) proposes allows everyone to feel centered ‘-in place, in language, in sensibility’. My creative work emerges from a daily practice of reading Stafford’s work and writing my own in response. February in Oregon collages my impressions of the Oregonian landscape with those of Staffords, seeking a way to feel at ‘home’ in the foreign landscape of Oregon. My paper is evenly divided into a critical section addressing the development of my compositional method and a performance of the resultant poem.

The Poet Jackson: A dao of poetry? Non-intentional composition, emergence, and intertextuality

Ten poems are presented, sampling my PhD research exploring how poetry might harmonise “Western” scientific and “Eastern” spiritual worldviews. The poems invite a liminal consciousness where science’s epistemic authority may meet on equal — not privileged — terms with the more ancient authorities of body and Earth. My chosen primary foci are modern physics, philosophical Daoism, and the ecosystemic perspective afforded by complexity theory (Capra & Luisi, 2014), in which large-scale patterns emerge unpredictably from relatively simple processes. This emergence, as Smith (2006, p. 172) remarks, is helpful in theorising how an artwork frequently “develops its own autonomous identity and ... takes the creator in directions quite different from his or her original intentions.” My methodology carries this further by seeking to abandon intention entirely. To achieve this I choose randomly from lists of sources and writing experiments. Influenced by the aleatory processes of conceptual writing and LANGUAGE poetry (Dworkin, n.d.; James, 2012), I appropriate, combine and re-present ideas and text from creative and non-fictional works. I take words from books or from what Tobin (2004, p. 126) calls the mind’s “other place” of poetry. A poem may or may not emerge; if one does, I have little idea what it may say or do. I work with eyes and fingers, pointing, highlighting, cutting and shuffling. I select and place text using body and instinct, not the thinking self. This non-intentional composition strives for the Daoist ideal of wei wuwei, action without action — egoless, selfless, apparently-effortless action. Moeller (2004) likens wei wuwei to Csíkszentmihályi’s (1990) concept of flow, the focused, effortless mental state also called “the zone”. Aspiring to become daojia shiren, “poet of Philosophical Daoism”, I practise yun you, “wandering like a cloud”, “searching everywhere” for the Way (Chen & Ji, 2016, pp. 178, 188).

Ali Black:  To become a butterfly, a caterpillar first digests itself: Writing for repossession and transformation
It is said stories support growth and transformation—personally and collectively, socially, culturally and spiritually. We can see this truth on ancient walls and history books, we can hear it in the words of elders passed down through the ages. In this space, I reflect and story my personal experience. Messages contained in the interpersonal of my everyday life (dis)connect with those of contemporary culture. In my dark cocoon-like experience of the everyday—depression, death, grief, loss, invisibility—the butterfly does not come. And so I (re)present to repossess using multi-layered, arts-based forms of narrative, image, poetry and creative writing—forms that embody and represent how change can happen, and the time it takes. These forms respond to deep desires to know and understand change and transition, to make meaning of experience—to make repossession visible. In this piece, contemplative storying creates sparks in the darkness, offering catalysts for dialogue and thinking, and possible frames for re/emergence.
 

Moderators
TC

Thom Conroy

Senior Lecturer, Creative Writing, Massey University
Thom Conroy teaches Creative Writing at Massey University. The Salted Air, his second novel, was published in 2016 (Penguin-Random House). The Naturalist, a historical novel featuring the German scientist Ernst Dieffenbach’s 1839 visit to New Zealand, was published in 2014 (Penguin-Random House). His short fiction has appeared in a variety of journals in the United States and New Zealand, including New England Review, Alaska Quarterly... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Jackson

Jackson

Poet; PhD candidate, Edith Cowan University
Jackson is a computer science graduate and poet. Her doctoral research at Edith Cowan University explores how poetry might harmonise 'Western' scientific and 'Eastern' spiritual worldviews. Her journal and anthology publications include Westerly, Plumwood Mountain, the Australian Poetry Journal and the forthcoming Fremantle Press Anthology of Western Australian Poetry. Jackson has published two books, a chapbook, seven zines and a CD. She won... Read More →
avatar for Ali Black

Ali Black

University of the Sunshine Coast
Dr Ali Black is an arts-based and narrative researcher in the School of Education, University of the Sunshine Coast. Her research and scholarly work seeks to foster connectedness, community, wellbeing and meaning-making through the building of reflective and creative lives and identities. Ali is interested in storied and visual approaches for knowledge construction, representation and meaning-making and the power and impact of... Read More →
MC

Monica Carroll

University of Canberra
Monica Carroll is a researcher at the University of Canberra. Her academic publications include papers on space and writing. Her research interests include phenomenology, poetry and empathy. Her widely published prose and poetry has won numerous national and international awards.
avatar for Donna Hanson

Donna Hanson

Donna Maree Hanson is a Canberra-based writer of fantasy, science fiction, horror, and under the pseudonym (Dani Kristoff) paranormal romance. Her dark fantasy series (which some reviewers have called ‘grim dark’), Dragon Wine, is published by Momentum Books (Pan Macmillan digital imprint). Book 1: Shatterwing and Book 2: Skywatcher are out now in digital and print on demand. In April 2015, she was awarded the A. Bertram Chandler Award... Read More →
CM

Caitlin Maling

University of Sydney
Caitlin Maling is a Western Australian poet. Her first books Conversations I've Never Had was published in 2015, a second collection Border Crossing is due in February 2017. She is completing a PhD in literature at the University of Sydney on comparative ecopoetics and the pastoral.


Tuesday November 29, 2016 1:30pm - 2:30pm
2A12 Building 2, UC

1:30pm

Found in Translation - Workshop :: 2A13
Found in Translation 

Words are only music in a language you don’t understand. Meaning changes when you don’t know the culture from which a poem comes from. We often hear the phrase “Lost in Translation” because it is easy to fail a poem, its music and meaning in the act of moving it from one language and culture to another. Hence, a good translation is often a re-creation.  But what if we took a poem in its original form and let it inspire us? Take us to a place we might otherwise never go?In this workshop we will examine a beautiful and musical poem by the iconic 20th Century Iranian poet, Forugh Farrokhzad. You will listen to a recording of her reading (in Persian) and follow the poem in transliteration along with its word-by-word translation. You will then be asked to write a creative translation based on your take on where the poem carries you. How does your world intersect with Forugh’s?  Can you mimic the music or cadence of her poem? Poems generated in this workshop will be considered for an anthology of new poems based on Farrokhzad’s poem.  

Speakers
avatar for Sholeh Wolpé

Sholeh Wolpé

Writer
Sholeh Wolpé is an Iranian-born poet and literary translator. She is the recipient of the 2014 PEN/Heim, 2013 Midwest Book Award and 2010 Lois Roth Persian Translation prize. Wolpé's nine books include, Keeping Time with Blue Hyacinths, Rooftops of Tehran, Sin—Selected Poems of Forugh Farrokhzad, and The Forbidden: Poems from Iran and Its Exiles. Wolpé's modern translation of Conference of the... Read More →


Tuesday November 29, 2016 1:30pm - 3:30pm
2A13 Building 2, UC

2:30pm

Crime and Punishment :: 2A4
Rachel Franks: Stealing stories: punishment, profit and the Ordinary of Newgate

The mid-1700s witnessed, in England, the development of a standard format to tell the stories of malefactors. In this way storytelling was simple as tales of various criminals followed a strict pattern of crime, capture and punishment. The origins of this was seen most obviously in the formula relied upon by Samuel Smith in the preceding century. Samuel Smith was the Ordinary of Newgate, a position that would be referred to today as the prison chaplain, and throughout his tenure, from 1676 until 1698, he would publish Accounts of criminals and their grisly ends. These Accounts, of which there were over 400 editions – offering over 2,500 biographies of hanged men and women – published between 1676 and 1772, were incredibly popular. With a price point of only a few pence, print runs were in the thousands and by the early 1700s the Ordinary was earning up to £200 per year for his entrepreneurial efforts. This paper argues that these biographical, and ostensibly didactic, stories were stolen: as criminals were perpetrators of a crime they were also the victims of greed. The practice of this authorised theft of criminals, their lives and exploits, clearly established the fact that penitence and profit make comfortable bedfellows, ensuring that true crime writing became a firm feature of the business landscape. That victims and villains suffered was, of course, very regrettable but no horror was so terrible that anyone forgot there was money to be made.

Nicole Anae: ‘Meat-Axe’ Poetry as Homage

This scholarly presentation explores the story of a real-life Australian teen-killer: Matthew Stephen Milat. The eighteen-year-old wrote a series of poems in the aftermath of murdering his seventeen-year-old friend with a double-headed long-handled axe on the victim’s birthday, 20 November 2010. The presentation takes as its title the characterisation of those poems by contemporary media. What intrigued me about this case was not only the killer and his direct familial blood-ties to an Australian serial killer, but the transgressive nature of the teen’s poems as apparently anomalous forms of homage to an ancestral legacy originating with the most infamous Australian serial-killer in modern times: Ivan Robert Marko Milat (b. 1944). Resonances between Milat crimes—primarily its location and the familial connection between Ivan and Matthew Milat, together with the assumption by people outside the literary field that all poetry is confessional—inspired the conviction that the grand-nephew’s acts were in part paying homage (from Medieval Latin ‘hominaticum’) to those of his grand-uncle. ‘Homage’ seems a fitting term if ‘To pay homage to someone with a thing … is, to make an offering’ (Millot 2010, p. 71). The ‘thing’ Matthew Milat offered as homage was, apparently, not only a murder echoing salient features of his grand-uncle’s signature, but a series of poems seemingly memorialising as homage the legacy of the Milat family infamy.

Ross Watkins: All Apologies (novel excerpt)
 
Adrian Pomeroy teaches English at a Sydney all-boys school full of bullshit artists in blazers. One day Adrian is called into the principal’s office to be notified that student Aaban Halim has made allegations of sexual assault against him. Adrian was expecting this… As a police investigation ensues, Adrian is forced to confront his recent foolish actions, reviving the complexity of emotions stemming from his childhood experience of sibling sexual abuse. Told from the perspectives of the families affected by the allegations, the novel interrogates the sorry acts of sexual exploration against a backdrop of the contemporary Australian family.
      All Apologies embodies discussions regarding the impact of sibling sexual abuse on both victim and perpetrator, which has become more widely recognised and discussed in recent decades (Keane et al. 2013). While Peter Carey’s The Tax Inspector (1991) portrays the damage and destruction of intrafamilial child abuse to ‘show the ultimate corruption and downfall of an Australian family’ (Bode 1995), All Apologies shows the potential for both dysfunction and resilience, as well as the effect this trauma can reap on other children and their families.
      This novel excerpt will be read aloud, with accompanying screen projection.

Bode, Barbara 1995 ‘Angels and devils: child sexual abuse in Peter Carey's The Tax Inspector’, Antipodes, Vol. 9, No. 2 (December): 107-110. <http://search.informit.com.au.ezproxy.usc.edu.au:2048/documentSummary;dn=970100102;res=IELAPA> ISSN: 0893-5580. [cited 29 Jul 16]
Carey, Peter 1991 The Tax Inspector, London: Faber & Faber
Keane, Michael, Guest, Andrea and Padbury, Jo 2013 ‘A Balancing Act: A Family Perspective to Sibling Sexual Abuse’ Child Abuse Review, 22: 246–254. doi:10.1002/car.2284

Gay Lynch: Theft in Fiction as Cognitive Act

Most fiction-writers draw on experiences they share with others, at least to some extent, and many make little attempt to disguise the practice. Through imagination and for expedient reasons, they steal and transform them: to express themselves as creative agents and to analyse problems in cognitive mode and to bear witness.  Memory, a kind of recount, is mediated by perspective and is, therefore, fiction. 

This paper will consider how many writers, including me, feel compelled to write about others as a means of making cognitive sense of experiences that might be construed as traumatic. Virginia Woolf wrote to acknowledge pre-existing truths that she had repressed; Phillip Roth believed he was creating truths by explicating and enlarging, from multiple perspectives, relationship problems that troubled him.  Both saw truth as a kind of reality: Roth enlarged; Woolf distilled.

Fiction writing can accrue therapeutic effect for creator and subject but is not therapy. Fiction is art and, therefore, subject to rigorous construction. Positive and negative consequences can result, for subjects and creators but, primarily, this paper is concerned with literary truths brought about by higher order thinking. The imparting of moral value to art is fraught and subjective and it depends on writerly rigour. Asserting fiction writers’ right to write fiction in which they draw on experiences that also belongs to others will be examined through the lenses of agency, cognition and literary truth. 

Moderators
avatar for Shane Strange

Shane Strange

Teaching Fellow, University of Canberra
Shane Strange is a doctoral candidate and Teaching Fellow in the Faculty of Arts and Design at the University of Canberra and an HDR member of the Centre for Creative and Cultural Research (CCCR). He tutors and lectures in Writing and Literary Studies. He is a writer of short fiction and creative non-fiction who has been published widely in Australia.

Speakers
NA

Nicole Anae

Central Queensland University
Nicole Anae graduated from Charles Sturt University with a B.Ed and Dip.T before earning her PhD through the Faculty of English, Journalism and European Languages at the University of Tasmania. Her research interests include the English literatures, Shakespeare, theatre history, Australian colonial and postcolonial writing, embodiment and performance, and the interplay between literature, performance and identity. She is Senior Lecturer in... Read More →
RF

Rachel Franks

University of Sydney, University of Newcastle, State Library of NSW
Rachel Franks is the Coordinator, Education & Scholarship, at the State Library of New South Wales, a Conjoint Fellow at the University of Newcastle, Australia and is at The University of Sydney researching true crime. Rachel holds a PhD in Australian crime fiction and her research in the fields of crime fiction, true crime, food studies and information science has been presented at numerous conferences. An award-winning writer, her work... Read More →
GL

Gay Lynch

Honorary Fellow, Flinders University
Gay Lynch is an honorary research fellow in creative writing and English at Flinders University. She has published short stories, most recently in Griffith Review: Our Sporting Life: 53, 2016, Best Australian Stories 2015 and Sleepers Almanac: 10 (2015), Apocryphal and Literary Influences on Galway Diasporic History (2010) and Cleanskin (2006) a novel. She was Fiction and Life Writing editor... Read More →
RW

Ross Watkins

University of the Sunshine Coast
Ross Watkins is an author and illustrator for both children and adults. His research primarily explores practices in illustrated narrative, representations of grief, and experimental writing modes such as fictocriticism.


Tuesday November 29, 2016 2:30pm - 3:30pm
2A4 Building 2, UC

2:30pm

Text and Technology :: 2A6

Rachel Robertson: Cross-Thievery: text and image in creative non-fiction

As electronic publishing offers more opportunities for short form publication and the affordable reproduction of image alongside text, contemporary creative non-fiction writers are increasingly incorporating images into their work. This presentation will investigate the cross-thievery that occurs between image and text in three very recent works of creative non-fiction (Antonetta 2016, Dentz 2016 and Reeder 2016) and how our reading of such works may change as a result.
      Using the frame of Bakhtin’s (1992) dialogism, I explore new chains of responses that may be read into a textual work when images are incorporated alongside, between or around the text. When a different creator is the ‘author’ of such images, the reader may interpret such polyphonic heteroglossia as contradiction, validation, appropriation, theft or a combination of all these. For example, in Antonetta’s work Curious Atoms (2016), the images from NASA appear to act as validating mechanisms and yet they may also be read as a thread of scepticism, questioning, for example, her analogy between the universe’s dark matter and her own brain’s unruly (bipolar) state.
      By presenting examples of the conjunction of text and image in short form creative non-fiction, I will examine creative ways of reading such juxtapositioning, suggesting new possibilities for creative exploration as writer as well as reader.

Antonetta, S.P. (2016) Curious Atoms. Essay Press groundloop series, 68. Wyoming, USA: Essay Press.
Bakhtin, M. M. (1992) The Dialogic Imagination: Four Essays. Austin: University of Texas Press.
Dentz, S. (2016) Flounders. Essay Press groundloop series, 62. Wyoming, USA: Essay Press.
Reeder, E. (2016) One Year. Series: Essay Press groundloop series, 66. Wyoming, USA: Essay Press. 

Lachlan Jarrah: Let’s Murder the Moonshine: Re-examining Marinetti’s Futurist Manifesto for the Modern Age

Arising from the ashes of a wrecked motorcar “face covered in repair shop grime, a fine mixture of metallic flakes, profuse sweat and pale blue soot” (Marinetti 1909, p2) Marinetti declares war on the past in his Futurist Manifesto (1909). Championing violence, speed, dynamism and the machine, the manifesto had a resounding impact on European culture, particularly in regard to visual arts and literature. This paper focuses on Marinetti’s Futurist Manifesto on Literature, a vicious attack on the literary establishment.  In his manifesto Marinetti seeks to strip down the barriers of language, laying waste to grammar and syntax, relishing in the chaotic grinding of the machine and the rattle of the automatic weapon. The principles of The Futurist manifesto transcend traditional views of literature, encompassing not only the thematic nature of text but it’s physical form and interpretation.
      According to Futurist scholars Tisdall and Bozolla “Almost every twentieth-century attempt to release language from traditional rules and restrictions has a precedent somewhere in Futurism” (Tisdall & Bozolla 1985, p10). In his writings Marinetti offered a revolutionary set of principles for emerging artists and writers to engage with new technologies of the early 20th century, absorbing them into their work and shedding classical pre-conceptions. Drawing from the works of Marinetti and following a stream of literature through the French writers Antonin Artaud and Pierre Guyotat this paper seeks to argue for a continuation for the war on form. By re-examining the Futurist manifesto for the modern era this paper  seeks to prove that writers in the 21st century can challenge current literary preconceptions and carve new pathways to artistic creation at both a thematic and textual level.



 

Moderators
avatar for Jordan Williams

Jordan Williams

Associate Professor of Creative Writing, University of Canberra
Associate Professor Jordan Williams is a poet and multimedia artist who teaches literature and creative writing at the University of Canberra. She researches the materiality of poetry and the use of ‘play’ in creative writing interventions for wellbeing and health. She has led the creative writing stream of two Defence ARRTS programs designed to promote the health and wellbeing of injured and ill Defence personnel.

Speakers
LJ

Lachlan Jarrah

HDR Student, Griffith University
Lachlan Jarrah is a PhD student at Griffith University on the Gold Coast. Lachlan's research is centred around reinterpreting and evolving core concepts of the avant-garde in contemporary creative writing. Lachlan is currently working on a creative writing PhD that crafts an allegory for the rise of Fascism in the Balkans through narrative experimentation and the revival of early 20th century artistic manifestos.
RR

Rachel Robertson

Senior Lecturer, Writing, Curtin University
Dr Rachel Robertson is a writer and Senior Lecturer in creative and professional writing at Curtin University, Australia. Her memoir Reaching One Thousand was shortlisted for the National Biography Prize and she is co-editor with Liz Byrski of Purple Prose, a collection of life writing by Australian women writers. Rachel is a past winner of the Australian Book Review Calibre Prize for Outstanding Essay and her creative non-fiction has been... Read More →


Tuesday November 29, 2016 2:30pm - 3:30pm
2A6 Building 2, UC

2:30pm

Biography and Life Stories :: 2A12
Patrick Mullins: ‘Justifying the profane: Ethics and Biography’

Since 2014, I have been researching a biography of Sir William McMahon, prime minister of Australia from 1971-72. The only prime minister to have not been the subject of a biographical study, McMahon has offered an exciting way to approach and explore the issues that confront biographers during their work. For me, the most pressing of these issues have been the ethical ones: questions of ownership, of the multiple responsibilities owed by a biographer, and the consequences of a finished work.
     In this paper, I examine the historical treatment and understanding of these ethical issues in order to contextualise my response to them as they’ve arisen in my practice. I argue that contention with these ethical issues is a necessary part of modern biographical practice and, indeed, demands both recognition of biography’s ‘profane’ nature and a justifying answer from the biographer—a tentative one of which, for my own work, I offer here.

Benjamin Miller: David Unaipon’s Life Stories: Aboriginal Writing and Rhetoric

David Unaipon (1872-1967) has been described as a scientist, author, anthropologist, preacher, inventor and public speaker. To these descriptions can be added musician, lecturer, curator, political activist, guide, and door-to-door salesman. A master of many trades, descriptions of Unaipon have struggled to merge the various aspects of his life into a single, coherent narrative. This paper focuses on Unaipon’s life stories – the stories told about him and his family and the stories he told about himself. A central argument of this paper is that, rather than describing Unaipon as a jack of all trades (or, worse, a master of none), Unaipon can accurately and productively be described as a “rhetor,” a person using various forms of media (and various forms of life writing) to present arguments across different social, political and cultural contexts to change beliefs about Aboriginality. To describe Unaipon as a rhetor can re-energise the arguments he put forward during his lifetime, can reveal the consistency and relationship between arguments he made in various fields or disciplines, can explain inconsistencies and contradictions in his life and writing, and, most importantly, can provoke debate and discussion about Unaipon’s life and writing at a time when, despite his prominence as one face on Australia’s $50 note, as the namesake of Australia’s most prestigious award for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander writing, and as an author anthologised in collections of Australian and Aboriginal writing, his writing is all but ignored in Australian culture and literary criticism.

Sue Joseph & Carolyn Rickett: To Begin to Know: David Leser resolves his 'burglar' eyes

Janet Malcolm, the noted journalist and author, asserts that: ‘The biographer at work…is like the professional burglar’.1 However, this notion of theft transcends the limits of biography to include the life writing genre which often takes the stories of others in producing a text. This writerly practice raises ethical tensions for authors negotiating the space and intersections between self and other, and proprietorial entitlement. Increasingly, with the heightened awareness of vulnerable subjects and familial allegiances, harm minimisation is often a consideration constraining narration.

The focus of this paper is the method in which Australian author and journalist David Leser navigates these tensions – journalistic investigator and the dutiful son; former husband and doting father – in constructing his patriography To Begin To Know: Walking in the Shadows of My Father.2

A prolific story teller, narrating the story of his father, publishing great Bernard Leser, was impossible earlier in Leser’s career. But enmeshing it with his own story, ten years later, somehow bridged a tacit gap between father and son.

 

Rosemary Williamson: Natural Disaster and Writing the (Political) Self: Julia Gillard’s My Story and Anna Bligh’s Through the Wall 

Through memoir, Australian politicians may reflect on leadership broadly but also on the particular challenges they face during extreme weather events. This is so in Julia Gillard’s My Story, published in 2014, and Anna Bligh’s Through the Wall: Reflections on Leadership, Love and Survival, published in 2015. Gillard was Prime Minister and Bligh was Premier of Queensland during the 2010-11 ‘summer of sorrow’, when floods wreaked havoc on large parts of Queensland. Gillard’s memoir devotes several pages to natural disaster, including the 2010-11 floods, and Bligh’s devotes over two chapters to the floods.

This paper will identify and compare the ways in which Gillard and Bligh frame their experiences of the 2010-11 natural disaster in the writing of their political selves. A possible consequence of this framing, it will argue, is that the memoirist serves to characterise not only herself, as a leader, but also the natural environment, as an adversary. This will be illustrated with particular reference to Bligh’s Through the Wall.

The paper will draw on and extend scholarship in the environmental humanities in a novel way, by viewing political memoir as a means by which dominant and potentially problematic views of the natural environment can be perpetuated. The writing of political memoir, in this sense, involves ethical considerations beyond those typically associated with the genre.

 

 

Moderators
avatar for Ben Stubbs

Ben Stubbs

Lecturer, University of South Australia
Dr Ben Stubbs is a travel writer and travel writing scholar who investigates the plurality of the form: in particular Ben’s focus is on modern ethical considerations, extending the “learned judgements” in the field to explore how it can advance understanding of culture and place and to examine its growing importance within journalism. To explore this area Ben combines traditional academic output with non-traditional writing. His book... Read More →

Speakers
SJ

Sue Joseph

Senior Lecturer, University of Technology Sydney
Sue Joseph (PhD) has been a journalist for more than thirty five years, working in Australia and the UK. She began working as an academic, teaching print journalism at the University of Technology Sydney in 1997. As Senior Lecturer, she now teaches creative writing, particularly creative non-fiction writing, in both undergraduate and postgraduate programs. Her research interests are around sexuality, secrets and confession, framed by the media... Read More →
avatar for Benjamin Miller

Benjamin Miller

Lecturer, University of Sydney
Dr Benjamin Miller is a lecturer in the School of Literature, Art and Media at the University of Sydney. He has published on representations of blackness and indigeneity in the Journal of American Drama and Theatre, Commonwealth Literatures, the Journal of the Association for the Study of Australian Literature and Studies in Australasian Cinema. He is currently working on a monograph about David Unaipon’s life and writing.
avatar for Patrick Mullins

Patrick Mullins

University of Canberra
Patrick Mullins is a lecturer in journalism at the University of Canberra, from where he obtained his PhD in 2014. He was the Donald Horne Creative and Cultural Fellow in 2015, a research fellow at the Australian Prime Ministers Centre at the Museum of Australian Democracy (2015-16) and the winner of the 2015 Scribe Non-Fiction Prize for Young Writers. His biography of Sir William McMahon will be published by Scribe in 2018.
CR

Carolyn Rickett

Senior Lecturer, Avondale College of Higher Education
Carolyn Rickett (DArts) is an Associate Dean of Research, Senior Lecturer in Communication and creative arts practitioner at Avondale College of Higher Education. She is co-ordinator for The New Leaves writing project, an initiative for people who have experienced or are experiencing the trauma of a life – threatening illness. Together with Judith Beveridge, she is co-editor of The New Leaves Poetry Anthology. Other anthologies she has... Read More →
RW

Rosemary Williamson

Senior Lecturer, Writing and Rhetoric, University of New England
Dr Rosemary (Rose) Williamson is Senior Lecturer in writing and rhetoric, and Convenor of Writing, School of Arts, University of New England. Her main research interests are Australian political discourse, and magazine history and writing. A current project examines the ways in which parliamentary speeches, press reports, political memoirs and magazine articles define Australians in relation to the natural environment at times of natural... Read More →


Tuesday November 29, 2016 2:30pm - 3:30pm
2A12 Building 2, UC

3:30pm

Afternoon Tea :: 2B Foyer
Tuesday November 29, 2016 3:30pm - 4:00pm
2B: Foyer Building 2, UC

4:00pm

New Publications 2 :: 2B7
Susan Currie
Axon Journal Issue 11 - Creative Work
Bourdieu Chapbook
Jen Webb
Paul Hetherington 

Moderators
avatar for Shane Strange

Shane Strange

Teaching Fellow, University of Canberra
Shane Strange is a doctoral candidate and Teaching Fellow in the Faculty of Arts and Design at the University of Canberra and an HDR member of the Centre for Creative and Cultural Research (CCCR). He tutors and lectures in Writing and Literary Studies. He is a writer of short fiction and creative non-fiction who has been published widely in Australia.

Speakers
SB

Scott Brook

Associate Professor, Writing, University of Canberra
Scott Brook is Associate Professor of Writing at the University of Canberra where he convenes and teaches 'Research and Practice' and 'Literature and Government'. He is also a member of the Centre for Creative and Cultural Research where he is working on two ARC Discovery Projects looking at creative vocations and creative arts graduates in Australia, China and the UK.
PH

Paul Hetherington

Professor of Writing, University of Canberra
Paul Hetherington is Professor of Writing at the University of Canberra and Head of the International Poetry Studies Institute (IPSI) there. He has published ten full-length collections of poetry, including Burnt Umber (UWAP, 2016) and five poetry chapbooks, most recently Earth. His collection, Six Different Windows won the 2014 Western Australian Premier’s Book Awards (poetry) and he was a finalist in the 2014 international Aesthetica... Read More →
avatar for Paul Munden

Paul Munden

Postdoctoral Fellow (Poetry & Creative Practice), University of Canberra
Paul Munden is Postdoctoral Research Fellow (Poetry & Creative Practice) at the University of Canberra. He is General Editor of Writing in Education and Writing in Practice, both published by the National Association of Writers in Education (NAWE), of which he is Director. He has worked as conference poet for the British Council and edited Feeling the Pressure: Poetry and science of climate change. Analogue/Digital, a volume of his new and... Read More →
avatar for Jen Webb

Jen Webb

Distinguished Professor of Creative Practice, University of Canberra
Jen Webb is Distinguished Professor of Creative Practice at the University of Canberra, and Director of the Centre for Creative and Cultural Research. Her work includes scholarly volumes Researching Creative Writing (Frontinus, 2015) and Art and Human Rights: Contemporary Asian Contexts (with Caroline Turner; Manchester UP, 2016), and poetry volumes Watching the World (with Paul Hetherington; Blemish Books, 2015) and Stolen Stories, Borrowed... Read More →


Tuesday November 29, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
2B7: Lecture Theatre Building 2, UC

5:00pm

Midsummer Night's Dream
A magical evening of poetry performances.

Moderators
avatar for Jordan Williams

Jordan Williams

Associate Professor of Creative Writing, University of Canberra
Associate Professor Jordan Williams is a poet and multimedia artist who teaches literature and creative writing at the University of Canberra. She researches the materiality of poetry and the use of ‘play’ in creative writing interventions for wellbeing and health. She has led the creative writing stream of two Defence ARRTS programs designed to promote the health and wellbeing of injured and ill Defence personnel.

Speakers
avatar for Jackson

Jackson

Poet; PhD candidate, Edith Cowan University
Jackson is a computer science graduate and poet. Her doctoral research at Edith Cowan University explores how poetry might harmonise 'Western' scientific and 'Eastern' spiritual worldviews. Her journal and anthology publications include Westerly, Plumwood Mountain, the Australian Poetry Journal and the forthcoming Fremantle Press Anthology of Western Australian Poetry. Jackson has published two books, a chapbook, seven zines and a CD. She won... Read More →
MC

Monica Carroll

University of Canberra
Monica Carroll is a researcher at the University of Canberra. Her academic publications include papers on space and writing. Her research interests include phenomenology, poetry and empathy. Her widely published prose and poetry has won numerous national and international awards.
JC

Jen Crawford

University of Canberra
Dr Jen Crawford is an Assistant Professor of Writing within the Centre for Creative and Cultural Research at the University of Canberra. She has also taught in New Zealand and Singapore. Her most recent collections of poetry are Lichen Loves Stone (Tinfish Press, 2015), Koel (Cordite Books, 2016) and 5,6,7,8, co-authored with Owen Bullock, Monica Carroll and Shane Strange (Recent Work Press, 2016). 
DH

Dominique Hecq

Associate Professor, Writing, Swinburne University of Technology
Dominique Hecq  has a background in literary studies, psychoanalysis and translation. Towards a Poetics of Creative Writing (2015) explores creative writing in the academy as an avenue for investigations of creativity while examining the relevance of psychoanalysis for the arts. She has published thirteen major creative works of which Stretchmarks of Sun (2014) is a companion piece to Out of... Read More →
RT

Ruby Todd

Ruby Todd is a writer of prose and poetry, with a PhD in Creative Writing and Literary Theory from Deakin University, where she teaches. Her research work investigates the ethics of writing elegy, with reference to mourning studies, poetics, and environmental philosophy.
AW

Amelia Walker

University of South Australia
Amelia Walker completed her PhD in early 2016 through the University of South Australia, where she now works teaching courses in creative writing and literature.
avatar for Sholeh Wolpé

Sholeh Wolpé

Writer
Sholeh Wolpé is an Iranian-born poet and literary translator. She is the recipient of the 2014 PEN/Heim, 2013 Midwest Book Award and 2010 Lois Roth Persian Translation prize. Wolpé's nine books include, Keeping Time with Blue Hyacinths, Rooftops of Tehran, Sin—Selected Poems of Forugh Farrokhzad, and The Forbidden: Poems from Iran and Its Exiles. Wolpé's modern translation of Conference of the... Read More →


Tuesday November 29, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Outdoor ampitheatre Open green area outside Building 2
 
Wednesday, November 30
 

8:30am

Registration :: 2B2
Wednesday November 30, 2016 8:30am - 9:00am
2B2: Registration/Bookshop Building 2, UC

8:30am

Exhibitions

Caren Florance (& Angela Gardner) 
Working Papers (jostles)
Exhibiting space: Building 2, Lower level A Foyer


These are large-scale reproductions of small process moments of Working Papers, an artists' book collaboration with poet/printmaker Angela Gardner. We are exploring the sense and nonsense of composition, the immersive space of creativity. She works with her own poetry, casting and gleaning, and I work with hand-set letterpress, re-arranging her words to make new strange castings. The small moments of play, experimentation and process are caught, copied, and thrown up and out to allow quick or slow contemplation. 

Laser-printed tyvek, 6 pieces, 841 x 1189mm ea. 


Jen Webb (poems), Paul Hetherington (poems), Andrew Melrose (music)
‘he sat weeping on the shore’: remembering those who mourn  (The Odyssey 5.82)
Exhibiting space: Room 2B2

In 2001, the Norwegian container vessel MV Tampa responded to a mayday call that led to the recovery of refugees, mostly Hazaras, seeking refuge in Australia. A period of international tension followed, with Captain Arne Rinnan insisting on landing the refugees on Australian soil, and the Australian government denying the request. This event is only one instance in a history of similar events; a history that is ongoing, with no let up in sight of the flows of desperate people. The objects in the installation seek to concretise the fragility of those seeking refuge; the poetry and other textual and sonic materials will attempt to re-imagine this event, and remember things that are forgotten in official representations of the global refugee crisis.

Mixed media: ship model, Preiser figures, eggshells, folded paper: 3D installation with sonic element, and handmade poetry collection for distribution 


Lorraine Webb and Jen Webb 
Letter and Line
Exhibiting space:  Upper level, 2B7, space outside room. 

These works are part of a larger collaboration between two sisters, one a painter and the other a poet. We are trying to find ways to work together within and across our forms: ways that are neither illustration nor ekphrasis. How does colour speak to word? What is the relationship between a line of poetry and a line of paint? Our first approach to this project is to break with some formal constraints: painting not on canvas but on odd-shaped objects; writing not lineated lyric poetry but prose poetry and fragments. Next is the openness that is a mark of most creative collaborations, a moving to and fro between images, ideas, conversations, essays into objects. We are concerned more with gestures than with the mark or the gaze, and with determining how, through the movement of eye and hand and conversation, we might make letter that speaks to line, line to letter. 

Mixed media; painting on timber shapes, handmade or altered string/s, poems. 4 pieces, variable size and shape; 420mm wide x 1080 long; 1430mm wide x c.1340mm; 1725mm long x 240mm (diagonal); 40mm wide x 820mm long; with 2 – 4 poems, A5-sized. 

Exhibitors
avatar for Caren Florance

Caren Florance

HDR student, University of Canberra
Caren Florance is a research student and sessional design tutor in the Faculty of Arts & Design at the University of Canberra, Australia. She often works under the imprint Ampersand Duck, and is an artist whose work focuses on the book and the printed word, using traditional letterpress and bookbinding processes along with more contemporary technologies. She also teaches at the ANU School of Art and is collected by national and... Read More →
PH

Paul Hetherington

Professor of Writing, University of Canberra
Paul Hetherington is Professor of Writing at the University of Canberra and Head of the International Poetry Studies Institute (IPSI) there. He has published ten full-length collections of poetry, including Burnt Umber (UWAP, 2016) and five poetry chapbooks, most recently Earth. His collection, Six Different Windows won the 2014 Western Australian Premier’s Book Awards (poetry) and he was a finalist in the 2014 international Aesthetica... Read More →
avatar for Andrew Melrose

Andrew Melrose

Professor of Writing, University of Winchester
Andrew Melrose is Professor of Writing for Children and Creative Writing at the University of Winchester, UK. He has over 160 film, fiction, nonfiction, research, songs, poems and other writing credits, including 15 films, 4 scholarly and 30 creative books. He is also the editor of the journal Write4Children and has written a number of books, articles and book chapters on various aspects of critical and creative writing and on child-centered... Read More →
avatar for Jen Webb

Jen Webb

Distinguished Professor of Creative Practice, University of Canberra
Jen Webb is Distinguished Professor of Creative Practice at the University of Canberra, and Director of the Centre for Creative and Cultural Research. Her work includes scholarly volumes Researching Creative Writing (Frontinus, 2015) and Art and Human Rights: Contemporary Asian Contexts (with Caroline Turner; Manchester UP, 2016), and poetry volumes Watching the World (with Paul Hetherington; Blemish Books, 2015) and Stolen Stories, Borrowed... Read More →



Wednesday November 30, 2016 8:30am - 2:00pm
Around Building 2

9:00am

Lying, Stealing and Life Writing :: 2A4
Daniel Juckes: ‘Forgotten! Dreadful Word …’

The French historian Jules Michelet considered the act of history to be one of resurrection, something joyous, beneficial to the dead brought back into the present. But there are two sides here: rescue and then wresting; resurrection or disturbance. Some days I am sure that what I am doing is right, and on others the choices I have made and the steps I have taken gnaw at my conscience. The thing I am doing is writing family history, composing a memoir of the journey I have been taking and making to discover the pasts of my grandparents, their parents, and their parents’ parents. The results are partial, exhilarating, and disturbing. The search was impelled by objects, by thousands of things left in an upstairs room, and I have stolen some of those things. The developing story was (and is still being) complicated and embellished by stories pinched, personalities surmised, and moments filched. Everything about the tale is questionable, including my desire—sometimes need—to tell it. And yet, do we not have a responsibility to remember and record? How could an amnesiac world in which we don’t remember even be considered? Michelet knew that the dead do not go away.

This paper will present a snapshot of the ethical dilemmas inherent in appropriating and telling my own family history, through the prism of some of those stolen objects (a note I wrote to my grandmother, a diary my grandfather kept, an old click-to-operate Viewfinder, 78 rpm shellac records). The levels of theft involved in telling family history are intricate and conflicting, and I will try to address these complexities. The paper will consider my desire to tell the past, and the need I feel to be transparent in how that reported past has been formed.

Marie O'Rourke: The Lustres: Life Glimpsed Through a Lyric Lens

“My past…was both simpler and more complicated than I had ever thought it to be,” writes Eula Biss—how might contemporary memoir reflect this apparent contradiction? A genre based on theft, memoir takes situations and characters from real life, appropriating the techniques of the fiction writer even as it claims the factual bedrock underlying traditional nonfiction. This paper will propose a way of recording our personal past which embodies the experiences, anxieties and understandings of our post-postmodern world.

Advances in memory studies have questioned the relationship between an actual event and how we remember it. Stealing insights from the growing fields of cognitive neuroscience and so-called ‘Neuro Lit Crit’, my creative practice aims to reflect the complexity of the workings of our mind. With an awareness of the brain’s tendency to create snapshots of key moments, I’ve adopted the form of lyric essay, a genre which steals the best qualities of lyric poetry and personal essay to offer flashes of intense clarity within the blur of everyday life.

‘Borrowing’ its title from lyric essayist Lia Purpura—who venerates “Scraps and spots, moments and lustres passing and glimpsed sidelong”—this presentation will argue that fragments stolen from memory, explored through symbol, metaphor, blank space and silence, may tell a more authoritative story than traditional memoir’s neat narrative progression. Reading from my own creative work-in-progress, I will explore the potential of the lyric mode when working in that zone where memory and imagination collide.

Melanie Pryor: 

‘When the people we used to be come knocking in the night: writing between old and new sleves'

This paper addresses the temporal and psychological space between the ‘I who wrote’ and the ‘I who writes now’ that the memoirist must often navigate. Using the journals I kept during a period of travel and my PhD’s creative work-in-progress, a memoir about place, in this paper I consider two selves: the self that is found in my journals, that represents immediate, corporeal experience, and the self that seeks to craft these journals into a memoir. Examining what writer and academic Micaela Maftei asserts is ‘the very real emotional, intellectual and psychological changes human beings undergo over time’, this paper considers selfhood, memory, and truth, and the intricate relationship between them.

Creative non-fiction writer Sean Prentiss uses philosopher Immanuel Kant’s notion of the noumenal and phenomenal worlds to describe two different kinds of truth: the noumenal, actual world, and the phenomenal world of appearances, that we experience individually through our senses. I argue that this distinction between truths is a critical means by which, in their process of remembering and writing, the memoirist can navigate the multiplicity of selves that inevitably emerges in their work.

Rather than seeking to answer the many questions that the themes of truth, memory and selfhood prompt, by illustrating how I navigate numerous selves in my creative practice, with this paper I wish to open a dialogue about how we might view and move between old and current selves when writing memoir.


Nicholas Velissaris: “Now where I have seen that before?” - Using Genre Conventions as Shortcut to Aid Narrative Comprehension

Melete’s Story is a choice-based narrative similar to the Choose Your Own Adventure series published by Bantam books in the 1980s/90s. In choice-based narratives the reader is able to choose how the story proceeds and many examples of this form use genre as a shortcut to assist the reader in making decisions.

Using genre rules and conventions enables a writer to borrow from existing stories and events to help the reader quickly understand the narrative. This type of priming allows a reader to more easily grasp the flow of the story and encourages a level of agency that permits the reader to make decisions about how the story should proceed.

Melete’s Story borrows heavily from the genres of political and conspiracy thrillers and from world events from the 1970s and 80s.  The narrative is based upon three major world events: the Watergate scandal, the end of the Cold War and the rise of military dictatorships throughout South America. Several sources, both fictional and factual, serve as the backbone for the story, these include Alan J. Pakula’s All the President’s Men (1976), and Costas-Gavras’ State of Siege (1972) and Missing (1981).

As these events have occurred in the recent past (the last 50 years), this presents an interesting dichotomy that allows for a blurring between the facts and the fiction. The writer can (and does) exploit this so that the reader will make assumptions about these events, and these assumptions can be used to control a reader’s focus and to anticipate how they will make decisions within the story.  This paper will look at how ‘borrowing’ from genre and recent history has shaped the development and construction of Melete’s Story and how this has extended my creative practice.
 

Moderators
RR

Rachel Robertson

Senior Lecturer, Writing, Curtin University
Dr Rachel Robertson is a writer and Senior Lecturer in creative and professional writing at Curtin University, Australia. Her memoir Reaching One Thousand was shortlisted for the National Biography Prize and she is co-editor with Liz Byrski of Purple Prose, a collection of life writing by Australian women writers. Rachel is a past winner of the Australian Book Review Calibre Prize for Outstanding Essay and her creative non-fiction has been... Read More →

Speakers
DJ

Daniel Juckes

Daniel Juckes is a creative writer and PhD candidate from Curtin University, Western Australia. He graduated from the University of Notre Dame with a Bachelor of Arts (History and Politics) and then from Curtin with a Bachelor of Arts in Professional Communication (First Class Honours). His book reviews have been published in the Australian Book Review and on the Westerly blog, his creative work will be published in Westerly: New Creative, and he... Read More →
MO

Marie O'Rourke

PhD Candidate, Sessional Academic, Curtin University
Marie O’Rourke is a Perth-based creative writer and PhD candidate from Curtin University whose research interests lie in the field of life writing, specifically, investigating the quirks of memory. Her current creative work-in-progress is a collection of lyric essays that experiments with form and language to push the boundaries of post-postmodern memoir. Previously published in Westerly and Australian Book Review, her work is soon to feature... Read More →
avatar for Melanie Pryor

Melanie Pryor

PhD candidate; sessional tutor, Flinders University
Melanie Pryor is a doctoral candidate in Creative Writing at Flinders University in the area of life writing. Her thesis examines experiences of embodiment in contemporary memoirs about place. Her work has been published in Overland, Southerly, Lip magazine, and short story anthologies. Melanie teaches Creative Writing and English at Flinders University, and co-founded The Hearth: A Night of Readings, a series of creative reading and... Read More →
NV

Nicholas Velissaris

RMIT
Nicholas Peter Velissaris is a doctoral candidate at RMIT University who is in the process of finalising his submission for his PhD. His practice-based dissertation is on identifying and defining a poetics of choice-based narratives and establishing a framework that creative writers can follow to create their own choice-based work. Through his practice he has written a choice-based narrative called Melete’s Story which tells the story of... Read More →


Wednesday November 30, 2016 9:00am - 10:00am
2A4 Building 2, UC

9:00am

Reclaiming Her Story :: 2A6
Janice Simpson: In the layers of a tiger’s eye: mapping adoption stories

What began as a project examining abandonment, and possibly the role of inherited psychological trauma in explaining why many adoptees report higher than usual levels of emotional distress about trust, security and the capacity to fully engage with others, has transformed into an exploration of the meanings and symbols adoptees attach to their conception and birth.
      My reading of the literature revealed several things:
1. adoption is largely silent in Australian histories and social commentaries, even those authored by feminists;
2. adoption literature and research focuses in the main on the experiences of relinquishing mothers; and
3. that most (if not all) adoptee stories are grief and identity stories, focusing on abandonment, trauma, loss and commodification.
      Largely unexplored are the meanings attached to conception and birth in adoptees’ narratives. Making use of the significant bodies of literature about how place defines, influences and shapes peoples’ lives, and the literature that suggests ways of coming to terms with the experiences of being an outsider, I am creating a map tracing the stories of 10 adoptees from conception to their current tracks upon the Australian continent.  The form of this work about place and memory and the ties that bind and identify is experimental, drawing on the practice of fictocriticism and various iterations of the essay.

Helena Kadmos: ‘It’s my story’: Memory and personal experience in the short story cycle.

Postmodern theorists have unsettled the idea of the auto/biography as a fixed, coherent record of an essential ‘truth’, paving the way for alternative understandings of personal memory and family history as socially and historically contingent constructs; the result of what might be called creative processes. This paper explores creative possibilities opened up by the short story cycle—collections of independent yet interrelated stories—to represent potent aspects of personal experience without fidelity to historical accuracy. The cycle achieves this through the cumulative effect of small narrative arcs drawn from the mundane, described variously throughout western literary history as epiphanies, moments of being, flashes and revelations. These snapshots, when pieced together as a whole, create a deeper, richer picture of personal transformation over time. This can be appealing for writers interested in the essence of experience. As author Alice Munro remarked that: ‘I want to write the story that will zero in and give you intense, but not connected, moments of experience’ because ‘I don’t see that people develop and arrive somewhere. I just see people living in flashes. From time to time’ (in Hernáez Lerena 1996 9 and 20). In this paper, I draw on my own creative practice using the short story cycle to reflect on and capture formative moments in my personal and family history.

Hernáez Lerena, María Jesús. 1996. ‘The apostrophe as narrative design in Alice Munro’s short story cycle The beggar maid’. REDEN 12:9–25.

 

Debra Wain: (Re)Writing sites of food preparation as spaces of women’s authority and autonomy

Women doing the cooking are responsible for the foodways decisions of their family and their community. (Re)writing sites of food preparation, as well as women’s roles in the creation of food, allows for a re-examination of the power that women wielded within this sphere. This paper will focus on the findings of food studies scholars as they relate to my creative practice of short story writing where women and their role in food production are given priority. This paper argues that when women make foodways choices, it gives them authority and autonomy. This is because foodways knowledge is an important asset in cultural maintenance. Most importantly, this article will consider the impact of foodways on individual and community ethnic identity where food is shown to be more significant than other factors such as birthplace, language or religion. It argues that women’s knowledge of foodways is considered an asset because of this significance to the maintenance of culture, which is especially important to groups that have migrated to a new place. The women of the food studies and within my fiction are the custodians of their cultures, and as the author, I have been required to borrow (or steal) from their store of knowledge.

Danielle Nohra: Stolen Landscapes: Trauma, Agency and Environmental Ideology in Lucy Christopher’s Stolen

This research is part of a larger investigation examining female protagonists’ interactions with the landscape in young adult fiction. It will argue that a close study of Lucy Christopher’s novel, Stolen (2009), demonstrates her use of the landscape as a vehicle to both create and negate trauma for the protagonist, Gemma. This can be depicted by reading the novel in relation two notions of environmental writing described by John Stephens (2006). The first ideological perspective Stephens describes in fiction is a human – landscape relationship where characters appear to be positioned embodying a higher status. This assumes control over the environment, creating trauma when characters face harsh landscapes. The second perspective models feelings of belonging within the landscape, prompting the protagonist to care for it. This enables characters to overcome their trauma and subsequently achieve a new sense of agency.

The paper will also draw upon Clare Bradford’s (2008) definition of agency in young adult dystopian fiction. Bradford’s book focuses on social, institutional and cultural arrangements that produce conflict in utopian and dystopian fiction. Her ideas on agency will be applied to this research but rather than examining human-made structures that engineer conflict, this paper will consider non-human conflict from the novel. Drawing also upon Christopher’s (2011) auto-ethnographic paper on Stolen, this research will ultimately analyse the ways that Gemma's relationship with the landscape is the vehicle used by Christopher to subsequently reshape her characters agency when viewed through the lens of Stephens' (2006).

 


Moderators
JC

Jen Crawford

University of Canberra
Dr Jen Crawford is an Assistant Professor of Writing within the Centre for Creative and Cultural Research at the University of Canberra. She has also taught in New Zealand and Singapore. Her most recent collections of poetry are Lichen Loves Stone (Tinfish Press, 2015), Koel (Cordite Books, 2016) and 5,6,7,8, co-authored with Owen Bullock, Monica Carroll and Shane Strange (Recent Work Press, 2016). 

Speakers
avatar for Helena Kadmos

Helena Kadmos

Krishna Somers Postdoctoral Fellow, Murdoch University
I'm the Krishna Somers Postdoctoral Fellow in Literary Studies at Murdoch University. My current research investigates, through traditional scholarship and creative practice, how the short story cycle represents contemporary Australian society and women’s lives in particular. I've published several short stories, including pieces in Westerly, Indigo and Eureka Street, and scholarly articles on the short story cycle and Jeanine Lean’s Purple... Read More →
DN

Danielle Nohra

University of Canberra
Danielle Nohra is Creative Writing graduate and a current Honours student at the University of Canberra. At present she is undergoing a research project on the Australian landscape and its effects on character trauma and agency in young adult fiction. She was also the former coordinating editor of the universities creative writing anthology; FIRST (2015). 
JS

Janice Simpson

HDR Student, RMIT
Janice Simpson is a PhD candidate in the School of Media and Communication at RMIT, Melbourne. Her creative practice research is focused on whether the place of conception and birth is significant for adoptees. She is exploring forms of the lyric essay and where that might lead in her creation of stories about place, memory and identity. Her crime novel Murder in Mt Martha was published in 2016. She is a member of the Nonfiction Lab at RMIT... Read More →
avatar for Debra Wain

Debra Wain

Deakin University
Debra Wain holds a BA(hons) in Creative Writing. She is a current PhD candidate and sessional academic in the School of Communication and Creative Arts at Deakin University. Debra is undertaking creative practice research into women, food and culture through her creation of a collection of short stories and a ficto-critical exegesis.


Wednesday November 30, 2016 9:00am - 10:00am
2A6 Building 2, UC

9:00am

Professional Skills - AAWP Postgraduate Plenary :: 2B11

The supervisory relationship is centrally important to successfully navigating postgraduate study.  At its best it can be a supportive and positive collaboration that develops both candidate and supervisor. However, to varying degrees, this isn’t always, or even often, the case.

This panel discusses the ways that postgraduate students might re-envision this relationship, particularly as it pertains to studies in writing.

  • Managing expectations in relation to supervision.
  • Recognising ​​different styles of supervision and how to work differently with each.
  • Supervision and the creative doctorate.
  • Professional and productive engagement practices.
  • Warning signs that the relationship is not working.
  • How difficulties are negotiated and overcome.
Join a group of newly-minted academics and experienced supervisors, in a discussion about not only the trials and tribulations of being supervised, but also handy strategies for how the relationship can be successfully negotiated.

Moderators
avatar for Lynda Hawryluk

Lynda Hawryluk

Course Coordinator, Creative Writing, SCU
Dr Lynda Hawryluk is a Senior Lecturer in Writing at Southern Cross University where she is the Course Coordinator of the Associate Degree of Creative Writing. Lynda lectures in Writing units and supervises Honours, Masters and PhD students. An experienced writing workshop facilitator, Lynda has also presented workshops for community and writing groups in Australia and Canada. She is the President and Chair of the Australasian Association of... Read More →

Speakers
NF

Niloofar Fanaiyan

University of Canberra
Niloofar Fanaiyan has a PhD from the University of Canberra in creative writing. She is currently a Donald Horne Creative and Cultural Research Fellow at the Centre for Creative and Cultural Research, University of Canberra, where she also tutors in creative writing and literary studies. Her research interests are primarily in the fields of narrative theory, poetry, identity studies, and liminal spaces. She recently won the 2016 Canberra... Read More →
AP

Antonia Pont

Senior Lecturer, Deakin University
Antonia Pont writes poetry, short fiction and nonfiction, and novel-length prose works. Her writing has appeared in Meanjin, Cordite, Antic Magazine, Newcastle Poetry Prize Anthology, Rabbit, TEXT, Gargouille, Axon, as well as international anthologies. She researches ontologies of creativity, practising theory and change, is Senior Lecturer in Writing & Literature at Deakin University... Read More →
AW

Amelia Walker

University of South Australia
Amelia Walker completed her PhD in early 2016 through the University of South Australia, where she now works teaching courses in creative writing and literature.


Wednesday November 30, 2016 9:00am - 10:00am
2B11 Building 2

9:00am

Stealing Across Borders :: 2A12
Ben Stubbs: After Dark: An exploration of nocturnal travel writing

In 1762 Jean-Jacques Rousseau wrote that we are blind half our lives because of what we miss at night. If we writers, researchers and travellers are all blind half our lives because of what we miss during the night, what are the narratives and the perspectives on place that we’re missing out on?
      This paper will explore the history of nocturnal travel writing in Europe through the 18th and 19th Centuries, focusing on work by flâneurs, or “noctambulators” as Beaumont calls them, who walked their cities in darkness: from Dickens and his night walks in London (1861) through to Restif de la Brettone (1789) and Nerval who embraced the possibilities of caprice with his “extreme” nocturnal wandering in Paris (1852).
      The second part of this paper will look at nocturnal travel writing and the flâneur from a modern perspective. This will be an auto-analysis of my own work in After Dark: A nocturnal exploration of Madrid (2016) which seeks to capture the same perspective of the “amateur detective and investigator of the city” as inspired by Walter Benjamin, though in a contemporary, nocturnal setting. Beyond presenting a unique perspective of the “otherness” of the city at night, it is my hope that After Dark also challenges the stasis of many contemporary works of travel writing, by not becoming “a function of learned judgement” (1978, p.67) as Said cautioned against in Orientalism, rather a piece which has an identifiable creative and ethical core.

Raelke Grimmer: Writing in Changing Social Contexts: Creating the Genre of Language Journalism 

Language journalism is a genre of writing which has emerged out of creative nonfiction over the past few decades. While the usefulness of genre classification has been debated in literary studies, a linguistic perspective sees genre, and the social contexts genres exist within, as essential in text creation. This paper discusses how language journalism has emerged as a result of how writers have responded to the changing social context of the past half century. Noam Chomsky and his influence in the field of linguistics and the status of English as a global language are used to illustrate the social contexts from which language journalism has emerged due to the ways writers have responded to these changing circumstances. 

Jennifer Anderson: The Art of Travel

'The Art of Travel' is an extract from a chapter of the same name in Permission to Speak: An Australian Student in China, 1979-1983, a memoir that explores the continuing process of personal transformation sparked by living among Chinese people and students from different countries in early post-Mao China. As she studies modern Chinese literature at Nanjing University, the narrator acquires a growing appreciation for Chinese poetics, inflected with a western Anglophone feminist sensibility and further re-shaped by limited Chinese linguistic and cultural proficiency. ‘The Art of Travel’ is a transcultural rumination on the purpose and aesthetics of travel, and on different ways of seeing. It identifies travel as the juxtaposition of moments of intense realization and discovery with those of extreme tedium, irritation and incomprehensibility. It explores the workings of resonance as a Sinophone sensibility in an Anglophone memoir genre.

Kathryn Hummel: Suite from The Bangalore Set: the poetry of ethnographic collaboration
This suite of poems from The Bangalore Set chapbook engages with the fields of postcolonial ethnography and arts-based inquiry. The result of a creative collaboration between Australian writer/ethnographer Kathryn Hummel and a diverse range of people she encountered while in residence in Bangalore, India, in 2015, the compositional process behind the poems suggest how arts-based methods can effect balance between the traditional roles of those involved in ethnographic studies—that is, between Researcher and Researched. Presented chronologically, the poems track Hummel’s progression from an outside observer to participant to interpreter of others’ views of the city, demonstrating how creative collaboration might shift ethnography away from its divisive colonial origins towards a practice more suited to contemporary postcolonial contexts.

Moderators
avatar for Patrick Mullins

Patrick Mullins

University of Canberra
Patrick Mullins is a lecturer in journalism at the University of Canberra, from where he obtained his PhD in 2014. He was the Donald Horne Creative and Cultural Fellow in 2015, a research fellow at the Australian Prime Ministers Centre at the Museum of Australian Democracy (2015-16) and the winner of the 2015 Scribe Non-Fiction Prize for Young Writers. His biography of Sir William McMahon will be published by Scribe in 2018.

Speakers
JA

Jennifer Anderson

Monash University
Jennifer Anderson is an academic language and learning adviser, and has studied and worked in China, Cambodia and Vietnam. Her memoir Permission to Speak: An Australian Student in China 1979-1983 is being completed as part of a PhD in Creative Writing at Monash University, Melbourne. Previous published work includes Chinese Women Writers: A Collection of Short Stories from Chinese Women Writers of the 1920s and 30s (HK... Read More →
avatar for Raelke Grimmer

Raelke Grimmer

Creative Writing PhD Candidate, Flinders University
Raelke Grimmer is a creative writing PhD candidate at Flinders University. She is researching language journalism as a genre and writing about Australia’s monolingualism and multiculturalism. Raelke holds an MA in Applied Linguistics from the University of Adelaide. For her MA dissertation she researched learning Czech through extensive reading using a text-based language learning approach.
avatar for Kathryn Hummel

Kathryn Hummel

Writer/Researcher
As a Social Sciences researcher, Dr Hummel investigates narrative ethnography and arts-based inquiry, with a focus on South Asia; as a writer, Kathryn’s work includes Poems from Here and The Bangalore Set. Her award-winning new media/poetry, non-fiction, fiction, photography and scholarly research has been published and presented throughout Australia, New Zealand, the UK, the US and Asia at diverse venues, including: Flinders and Curtin... Read More →
avatar for Ben Stubbs

Ben Stubbs

Lecturer, University of South Australia
Dr Ben Stubbs is a travel writer and travel writing scholar who investigates the plurality of the form: in particular Ben’s focus is on modern ethical considerations, extending the “learned judgements” in the field to explore how it can advance understanding of culture and place and to examine its growing importance within journalism. To explore this area Ben combines traditional academic output with non-traditional writing. His book... Read More →


Wednesday November 30, 2016 9:00am - 10:30am
2A12 Building 2, UC

10:00am

Cognitive Encounters :: 2A4
Carol Hoggart: Theoretical Theft: Chaucer, literary theory and the (re)creation of fictional character

Does the application of literary theory stifle the act of creative writing? Should one theorise only after the creative act? This paper argues that the fictional reinterpretation of a complex literary character may be facilitated and indeed enhanced by the prior application of theory. To be more specific, I argue that my creative rewriting of the Wife of Bath (of Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales) has been empowered by Elizabeth Fowler’s theory of ‘social persons’. Further, I propose that Fowler’s character theory has the potential to enrich the creation of many kinds of textual character. The following paper first introduces Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales and one of its constituent characters, the Wife of Bath. It then describes Fowler’s theory and applies it in broad brush-strokes to the Chaucerian portrayal of the Wife. Finally, I demonstrate the way in which such theory and practice of literary critique may inform creative writing in the case of my historical novel of the Wife of Bath, The Scarlet Woman

Amelia Walker: In/Sane insights: a poetic inquiry into meaningful metaphors of psychosis

Can a poem be stolen with permission? If it can, what ethical implications – and imperatives – accompany the act of ‘stealing’ from someone already robbed of their voice and endless other rights through involuntary detention within the western psychiatric healthcare system? These two questions underlie this three-part creative work, which also experiments with the possibilities metaphor presents for enhancing interpersonal connections and constructing ethical knowledges in mental health care and research. I write as a former nurse as well as a former patient, thereby offering a rare dual perspective. The first of the three parts in the creative work is a ‘stolen’ poem featuring metaphors generated by a friend who was then receiving psychiatric treatment. This is followed by two prose passages, which contextualise the poem, interpreting the vital meanings my friend’s metaphors hold for me. These, in turn, are followed by a research statement that offers explicit discussion and explication to themes and questions implicit and/or ambiguous within the creative sections. The research statement also functions to consider and revise what might seem to be (but are not) the creative work’s explicit and/or consolidated arguments – for these seeming arguments are designed to provoke, rather than persuade. They lay ground for the research statement’s more critical reconsideration of this work in its broader context. And yet, even the research statement ultimately points towards new questions as opposed to final solutions: it opens directions and underscores the need for further critical and creative inquiry and research into the problems and possibilities of collaboration, (re)interpretation, ethicality, theft and knowledge-making in and beyond the realms of mental health and so-called illness, and particularly into the prospects as well as risks metaphor (re)presents in and for such inquiries. Through complementary actions of poetry, storying and the research statement, this creative and critical text as a whole thereby operates at the nexus of poetic inquiry (Prendergast, Leggo & Sameshima 2009), narrative inquiry (Clandinin & Connelly 2004), autoethnography (Ellis, Adams & Bochner 2011), narrative medicine (Charon 2006), narrative psychiatry (Lewis 2011) and creative writing research (Krauth & Brien 2012), aiming to contribute to ongoing discussions regarding metaphor, methodology, collaboration, theft and ethicality in and across diverse interdisciplinary fields and contexts.  

Paul Magee: Composition as Creative Memory: Homeric Resonances into the Present

Rates of between 10 to 20 decasyllabic lines per minute were not unusual, Albert Lord notes, in reference to the Yugoslavian oral poets whom he and Milman Parry recorded composing on the spot in the 1930’s. Lord offers two possible explanations for the poets’ extraordinary speed, a factor one could witness at any live performance. Either each such a poet is a ‘phenomenal virtuoso’; or ‘he has a special technique of composition outside out own field of experience.’ (1960: 17). Lord opts for the second of these possibilities and proceeds to explain the composition of oral poetry in terms of the poet/singer’s stringing together of a series of formulaic phrases (“wine-dark sea”, “Rosy-fingered dawn”, “swift-footed Achilles”), i.e. pre-given clusters of words whose metrical and other properties might facilitate “rapid composing in performance.”  In Lord’s words, the oral poet not only ‘makes no conscious effort to break the traditional phrases and incidents’, but is rather ‘forced by the rapidity of composition in performance’ to use them (1960: 4). One might think of duelling in rap. But the Iliadic phrases I have just cited are an indice to the fact that Lord and Parry’s work, though conducted on present-day Yugoslav materials, was intended to cast light on the composition of the Homeric poems as well, and is widely  (though not unanimously) accepted by classical scholars to have been successful in this regard. The Homeric poems were not transmitted through some fantastic act of memory but rather by being repeatedly and rapidly made up on the spot, on the basis of pre-given elements, which included as well as diction, stereotypical scenes and familiar plots.
      Having set forth something of Parry and Lord’s extraordinary empirico-speculative researches, I turn to Elizabeth Minchin’s nuancing of the Parry-Lord account (2001), which suggests that the oral poet’s creation of ‘typical scenes’ or ‘themes’ owe their formulaic nature less to the processes of traditional bardic inheritance Lord and Parry sketch than to the schemas of episodic and procedural memory we instantaneously draw on in everyday conversation and thought to represent our world. I note a surprising resonance between Minchin’s arguments and those William Wordsworth put forward in his famous ‘Preface’, one of the inaugurating manifestos of that modern, verbally iconoclastic poetic project (‘to break the traditional phrases and incidents’) Lord alludes to, and distinguishes oral poetries from. I am referring to Wordsworth’s claim that repeated perception of the everyday passes through the generalising processes of memory into the acts of ‘spontaneous overflow’ at the core of poetic composition (1909: 6). For Wordsworth too, the poetic act is a matter of sudden remembering. Can one remember something new?



Moderators
DH

Dominique Hecq

Associate Professor, Writing, Swinburne University of Technology
Dominique Hecq  has a background in literary studies, psychoanalysis and translation. Towards a Poetics of Creative Writing (2015) explores creative writing in the academy as an avenue for investigations of creativity while examining the relevance of psychoanalysis for the arts. She has published thirteen major creative works of which Stretchmarks of Sun (2014) is a companion piece to Out of... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Carol Hoggart

Carol Hoggart

HDR Student, Curtin University
Carol Hoggart is a final year PhD candidate at Curtin University undertaking a creative-production thesis to re-interpret the Wife of Bath, a character from Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales. This will result in an academic exegesis and the medieval-set historical novel, The Scarlet Woman. Carol previously studied history and English at the University of Western Australia. She has published an historical novel set in Viking Era Norway (A Hawk... Read More →
PM

Paul Magee

Associate Professor, University of Canberra
Paul Magee is Associate Professor at the University of Canberra and has published widely on poetics, psychoanalysis, postcolonial studies and Marxian thought. His books are Stone Postcard (2014), Cube Root of Book (2006), both in verse, and the ethnohistorical monograph From Here to Tierra del Fuego (2000). His current project, from which this paper is drawn, is a book entitled Suddenness: On Rapid Knowledge.
AW

Amelia Walker

University of South Australia
Amelia Walker completed her PhD in early 2016 through the University of South Australia, where she now works teaching courses in creative writing and literature.


Wednesday November 30, 2016 10:00am - 11:00am
2A4 Building 2, UC

10:00am

Considering the Future :: 2A12
Lisa Dowdall: Unknowing

Unknowing is a fictocritical piece combining science fiction and essay to explore how ecological crisis necessitates new modes of story-telling. It is an experiment in writing the Chthulucene – a term coined by Donna Haraway that captures “real and possible timespaces” (160), borrowing from Lovecraftian horror to evoke the global, tentacular systems of inter-species being and becoming in the context of climate crisis, species loss and natural disaster.
      This piece appropriates the work of science fiction/weird writers China Miéville and Jeff Vandermeer to put forward some embryonic ideas on thinking, feeling and knowing in the Anthropocene, taking vegetal life as a powerful actor in worlds of mutual transformation between humans and non-humans. It therefore steals now only from existing literary practice but also the semiotic processes of plants themselves to suggest a way of recognising the subjectivities of autopoietic lifeforms within living systems of exchange.
      Informed by recent work in plant intelligence and new theories of posthumanism that call for a “flow of relations with multiple others” (Braidotti 50), Unknowing evokes the constantly evolving affiliations and assemblages that characterise vegetal life, especially within periods of planetary flux. It is a preliminary work that hopes to contribute to discussion of the role of weird, monstrous and fabulist writing in response to environmental crisis. 

Thom Conroy: A Slow Fake Song

As Jeremy Hawthorn and Jakob Lothe acknowledge in their introduction to an edited 2013 collection on the topic, the very mention of the term ‘narrative ethics’ ‘carries with it . . . a certain ideological charge’ (1). This charge signals a turn away from the assumptions—if not the tools—of the literary theories of structuralism and poststructuralism, and toward a contemporary discourse returning us to earlier notions of literature as an essentially ethical project. The new turn, or return, to ethics may be distinguished by its figuration as a rhetorically-constructed encounter or relationship between an author, the form of the narrative, and a reader. Conceiving of the reading experience as an ‘encounter’ shifts our conception from reading the ethical content of a work toward reading our encounter with that work.
     Lorrie’s Moore’s short story ‘People Like That are the Only People Here: Canonical Babbling in Peed Oink’ stands out as a text in which the readerly encounter is dominated by the ethical claims of the narrative. It may be more accurate to say that ‘People Like That are the Only People Here’ is a story built across what I might call ‘zones of narrative ethical ambiguity’: Moore’s story is told in a precarious and ethically-charged boundary space between fiction and non-fiction; art and reality; and narrative and the limits of narrative. The exceptional position of such a text makes equally exceptional ethical claims on its readers, and in this paper I work through attempts to negotiate these claims. 

Jason Nahrung: Stolen Futures: the Anthropocene in Australian SF mosaic novels
Commentators such as Naomi Klein (2016) and Kim Stanley Robinson (2016) have warned that a failure now to adequately address anthropogenic climate change is an act of intergenerational theft. So great are these man-made impacts the term Anthropocene has been suggested to delineate a new epoch in the planet’s history. Australian writers are using science fiction and cli-fi, or climate fiction, to examine possible conditions faced by future generations that reflect on our current approach to the phenomenon. This paper argues that the mosaic novel, in concert with a science-fiction approach, is particularly well suited to this task in its use of interlinked short stories as a reflection of the complex elements of global climate change. My mosaic novel, “Watermarks”, being written as part of my PhD in creative writing, is set in near-future Brisbane. It draws attention to what has been identified as a relatively neglected topic in climate fiction: mitigation (Clode and Stasiak, 2014; Jordan, 2014). “Watermarks” uses a bricolage method in its construction, which also has resonance for the amorphous, interwoven aspects of anthropogenic climate change. The book adds to the small canon of other Australian writers who have used the science fictional mosaic to present visions of future life in the Anthropocene: Sue Isle’s Nightsiders (2011); James Bradley’s Clade (2015); and Steven Amsterdam’s Things We Didn’t See Coming (2009).

Susan Presto: Poethics – taking responsibility for the unknowability

Is creativity a way to take control of chaos? In creating, the artist takes a chance on an uncertain outcome: a risk for something important, a need to express a view of the chaos of life, to make sense of the nonsensical. Considering how real life muddies the logic of ethical analysis, any attempt at recreating reality must take responsibility for reality’s unknowability.

Writing poethically must therefore acknowledge that ‘real’ is not an uncontested attribute, and reality is about individual conception. This ideal must also be tempered by a consideration of the one unchanging element, human nature.

Moderators
avatar for Chantelle Bayes

Chantelle Bayes

Chantelle Bayes has recently submitted her creative writing PhD exploring nature/culture relationships in fiction about cities. 

Speakers
TC

Thom Conroy

Senior Lecturer, Creative Writing, Massey University
Thom Conroy teaches Creative Writing at Massey University. The Salted Air, his second novel, was published in 2016 (Penguin-Random House). The Naturalist, a historical novel featuring the German scientist Ernst Dieffenbach’s 1839 visit to New Zealand, was published in 2014 (Penguin-Random House). His short fiction has appeared in a variety of journals in the United States and New Zealand, including New England Review, Alaska Quarterly... Read More →
LD

Lisa Dowdall

University of New South Wales
Lisa Dowdall recently submitted her PhD in Creative Practice at the University of New South Wales. Her fantasy novel, Impossible Things, imagines magic as a non-renewable resource, while her dissertation explores postcolonial women’s science fiction/fantasy. Her work has been published or is forthcoming in Paradoxa, Spineless Wonders and Global Media Journal. 
avatar for Jason Nahrung

Jason Nahrung

University of Queensland
Jason Nahrung, a Ballarat-based journalist, editor and writer, is undertaking a PhD in creative writing at The University of Queensland. His MA in creative writing from QUT explored Australian vampire Gothic. While he writes across the gamut of speculative fiction, all four of his novels and most of his 20-odd short stories lean towards the dark side.
avatar for Susan Presto

Susan Presto

The Southport School
Currently working on my PhD in creativity and on year thirteen as an Senior English teacher at The Southport School on the Gold Coast. A background in film making and as a chef on private yachts has enhanced a lifelong engagement with creativity in all forms.


Wednesday November 30, 2016 10:00am - 11:00am
2A12 Building 2, UC

10:00am

Oral Histories, Indigenous Stories, and Ways of Knowing :: 2B11
Ariella Van Luyn: Artful life stories: authorised theft and oral histories

‘Maris Dissents’ is a fictive short story based on an oral history interview: a form of authorised theft. The story demonstrates the way imagination can intersect with historical evidence to explore emotional and narrative constructions of the past. While, the oral history is given with permission, the interviewee’s name is changed in the story to demonstrate the fictional quality of the work and to protect their anonymity. This story is part of my on-going creative practice investigating the ways creative writers can imaginatively engage with historical sources to represent the past, and the relationship between historical fiction, historical evidence, and representations of the past. In-keeping with creative practice-led research methodology, I engaged deeply with the scholarship around oral history and historical fiction to produce the creative work.

Oral histories can be rich sources of personal, affective knowledge about the past, and demonstrate the ways history ‘lives on in the present’ (Grele 2006, p.59). Similarly, historical fiction is a form that is a product of the present imaginatively representing the past. This quality of historical fiction can draw attention to the nature of historical knowledge (Pinto 2010). Thus, historical fiction informed by oral histories has the capacity to explore the personal impact of historical events, and in doing so, draw attention to the narrative construction of the past. This short story demonstrates the way fiction can be a means of drawing attention to the day-to-day lives of people in the past, often lost to historians, and their means of sense-making, which is often an on-going process. In this way, the story demonstrates how historical fiction, though fictional techniques, allows an occupation of a character’s subjectivity, and in doing so, demonstrates the personal significance of past events.

 

Pip Newling: ‘Teaching writing, teaching whiteness with Fiona Nicoll and Kim Scott’ 

This paper retells the semester-long experiment I ran teaching a subject titled ‘Writing across borders’ at the University of Wollongong in 2016. Using Kim Scott’s novel That Deadman Dance as the spine of the course, students addressed the literary techniques of cross-cultural writing, magical realism, metafiction, creative nonfiction and cross-platform writing. With the focus on Scott’s novel came the focus on race and on Indigenous and non-Indigenous relationships in Australia and the stories told of these relationships. I employed Fiona Nicoll’s approach to race discussions in the classroom by utilising her concept of critical whiteness theory and the significance of Indigenous sovereignty to discussions of this ilk. I also used her 2004 essay ‘Are you calling me a racist?’ (Nicoll, 2004) as a guide and companion across the course. Was it a success? Depending on the measure – student engagement, experimenting with the course ideas in their work, richness of the classroom discussions – the outcomes were a mixed bag. But was it fruitful, challenging and rewarding? Yes. Would I do it again? Of course. 

Penelope Jones: Memorials and Remembering: Ways of including Indigenous Pasts and People

Australia is a post-colonial society, with the trauma and cruelty of the colonisation process still affecting both the Indigenous and non-Indigenous societies, and it asks we, as writers, to consider ethical questions and the creative writing practice of how to honour Indigenous pasts and re-present Indigenous people and issues. To be able to address current issues, I argue that we need to continue to acknowledge and understand the past, accept historical consequence and the legacy given to us by our past generations, to sustain a dialogue of empowerment and positive change in Australian fiction writing for both Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. 

Jen Crawford & Paul Collis: Five Groundings for Indigenous Story in the Australian Creative Writing Classroom

“All Australian children deserve to know the country that they share through the stories that Aboriginal people can tell them,” write Gladys Idjirrimoonra Milroy and Jill Milroy. If country and story, place and voice are intertwined, it is vital that we make space in Australian creative writing classrooms for the reading and writing of indigenous story. What principles and questions can allow us to begin?
     We propose five groundings for this work:

1  There is no such thing as indigenous story, and yet it can be performed and known.  

2  Indigenous story is literary history, literary history is creative power.

3  We do culture together: culture becomes in collaboration, conscious or unconscious.

4  Country speaks, to our conceptions of voice and point of view.

5  Story transmits narrative responsibility.  Narrative responsibility requires ‘fierce listening’. 



Moderators
NK

Natalie Kon-Yu

Victoria University
Natalie Kon-yu is a writer, academic and a commissioning editor of both Just between Us: Australian Writers Tell the Truth about Female Friendship (2013) and Mothers and Others: Why not all Women are Mothers and not all Mothers are the Same (2015). She is a lecturer at Victoria University where she is currently researching gender bias in the literary prize culture, and her critical and creative work has been published nationally and... Read More →

Speakers
PC

Paul Collis

University of Canberra
Dr Paul Collis is a Barkindji man from Bourke, on the Darling River in north-west New South Wales. He is a fiction writer and poet who draws upon both Aboriginal and Western narrative traditions in his work,  and is the 2016 winner of the David Unaipon Award. He teaches creative writing at the University of Canberra, where he earned a PhD in Communications and was the winner of the Herbert Burton Medal, its most prestigious... Read More →
JC

Jen Crawford

University of Canberra
Dr Jen Crawford is an Assistant Professor of Writing within the Centre for Creative and Cultural Research at the University of Canberra. She has also taught in New Zealand and Singapore. Her most recent collections of poetry are Lichen Loves Stone (Tinfish Press, 2015), Koel (Cordite Books, 2016) and 5,6,7,8, co-authored with Owen Bullock, Monica Carroll and Shane Strange (Recent Work Press, 2016). 
avatar for Penelope Jones

Penelope Jones

HDR Student, Deakin University
I have completed a double degree in Creative/Professional Writing and Literary studies at Deakin University, graduating with honours. I'm currently a PhD Candidate, at Deakin University.
AV

Ariella Van Luyn

James Cook University
Ariella Van Luyn works as a lecturer in writing at James Cook University, Townsville. Her research interests are historical fiction, oral history, community storytelling and practice-led research. Her manuscript was shortlisted for the Queensland Literary Awards 2012. She is the author of a novel, Treading Air.
PN

Pip Newling

Honorary Postdoctoral Associate, University of Wollongong
Dr Pip Newling is a Honorary Postdoctoral Research Associate at the University of Wollongong where she received her Doctor of Creative Arts (Creative Writing) in 2015. She has taught into the creative writing and professional writing programs at RMIT Melbourne, University of Wollongong and Open Universities Australia. She is a published author, her publications include a memoir Knockabout Girl (HCA 2007), and creative nonfiction essays in... Read More →


Wednesday November 30, 2016 10:00am - 11:00am
2B11 Building 2

10:00am

Henry James' Wifi Password - Creative Research :: 2A13
Ffion Murphy: Economies of writing and desire: Henry James’ and the exegetical act 
As rhetorical constructs and complicit narratives, exegeses reward analysis by students and teachers of writing interested in philosophies of composition and the ways writers construe their literary, social and economic contexts and seek strategically to intervene in their work’s reception and interpretation. Drawing on theories of the paratext (Genette) and the frame (Pearson) as well as various notions of ‘value’, this paper investigates some uses and effects of literary exegesis, taking as its main study Henry James’s preface for The Spoils of Poynton, which was published in the New York Edition of his revised and collected novels and tales in 1908. Paratexts can be as intriguing, conflicted, contradictory, aspirational, figurative and libidinous as the creative work they reference, while they can also reveal and invite us to question the various economies that engender them. I explore James’s insistent metaphors of labour, commerce, waste, and (pro)creation, his anxieties about the (excessive) female voice in life and publishing, his desire for literary preservation and ‘appreciation,’ his conjuring of the ‘sublime economy of art’ and his strange doubling as ‘master-builder’ and ‘modern alchemist’. James envisaged that providing the ‘accessory facts in a given artistic case’ was a means of adding ‘contributive value’ to his previously published works, and universities, by their desire for paratextual accompaniments for creative writing submissions, likewise buy into an exegetical economy that has ‘value adding’ at its core. 

Julienne van Loon:  What do researchers do? The practice of knowledge-making through play 

This paper explores play as a practice, as a disposition, and as a crucial element in the production of research and new knowledge. Informed by a multidisciplinary literature review on play (from psychoanalysis to animal studies, ludology and anthropology), the paper showcases the results of an ongoing qualitative research project on the relationship between play and research practice.
     Drawing on material collected from interviews with twelve leading Australian researchers, the paper highlights possible links between research and creative production success and lifelong practices that enable and prioritise play and playfulness. A key focus is surety versus contingency, or rules versus the absence of rules, and the way in which these two forces or frameworks shift and interact during the process of research. How do new knowledge and innovation play off uncertainty? What is the role of the accident, the dead end, and the serendipitous in the creation of new work?
      My research is based on the premise that play is as crucial to the production of innovative research in traditional academic fields as it is to the production of new work in the creative arts. It emphasizes similarities in regards to research practice across the Australian Research Council’s five key discipline areas, and signals opportunities for further research in this area.
      This paper extends on early work on this topic presented at the Australasian Association of Writing Program Conference in 2015. It speaks to the one of the conference’s central themes for 2016: the question how we make. The broader intention is to raise the status of play as a means for fostering innovation, experimentation and new knowledge, and to argue for research policy frameworks that actively foster contingency, possibility and the unforeseen. 

Lynn Jenner: Opportunity, Fixed Points and the Space In-between: The Creative Writing PhD at the International Institute of Modern Letters 

This small-scale qualitative study examines relationships between the critical and creative components in The International Institute of Modern Letters (IIML) PhD as understood by six participants (graduates, supervisors and examiners) in the IIML community of practice. Consideration of the options available for the critical component leads to consideration of flexible space and fixed points within the degree structure and examination criteria. Flexibility in wording of the degree requirements allows or perhaps encourages experimentation by students in terms of the critical component of the degree. This paper focuses on practical strategies to help students navigate this space. Participants outline strategies they find useful for creative writing PhD students including ‘performing what you do’, the use of an annotated bibliography and giving primacy in the critical component to the craft issues identified as significant for the creative component. Participants describe ways to frame the thesis effectively for examiners.  ‘Writerly critical work’ is discussed as an alternative to expository academic prose, along with the academic risks of including non-traditional critical writing in a PhD. The author links practices that support students to learn conscious orchestration of the flexibility and rigidity factors to the concept of learner agency. 

Jessica Seymour: 

Is there WiFi on this plane?

When future researchers look back on this generation seeking to understand our culture and society, the internet will be a rich source of archival study. We as a culture have begun to digitise not only our records and our history, but also ourselves. Contemporary internet users construct digital ‘bodies’ through social media platforms such as Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram – performing their personalities in order to participate in the online culture – while Bots and Cookies track our use of the online space in order to predict which advertisements would be most effective. It is through this combination of deliberate construction and the (somewhat neutral) reflections of man-made, coded interpreters that our online ‘selves’ form.
      The purpose of this creative work is to explore identity-constructing practices in the online space, to reflect on the ways that the online archive can be read, and to develop an experimental non-fiction work using the internet as a base medium. The work takes the form of a travel memoir, told through a combination of my social media outputs and internet history between November 18, 2015, and March 1, 2016. I have selectively compiled posts and archived pages in order to produce what I consider to be an authentic representation of my experience, constructing a narrative of myself through the glimpses and ambiguous realities of the online world.

 

Moderators
avatar for Shane Strange

Shane Strange

Teaching Fellow, University of Canberra
Shane Strange is a doctoral candidate and Teaching Fellow in the Faculty of Arts and Design at the University of Canberra and an HDR member of the Centre for Creative and Cultural Research (CCCR). He tutors and lectures in Writing and Literary Studies. He is a writer of short fiction and creative non-fiction who has been published widely in Australia.

Speakers
avatar for Lynn Jenner

Lynn Jenner

Honorary Research Fellow, Victoria University of Wellington
Lynn Jenner is a writer, researcher and teacher from the Kāpiti coast of the North Island of Aotearoa New Zealand. Lynn’s research interests are pedagogy in the area of creative writing and evaluation.Her second book Lost and Gone Away, an adaptation of her hybrid PhD was a finalist in the Non-Fiction section of the Ockham New Zealand Book Awards in 2016. Her first book Dear Sweet Harry won the NZ Society of Authors award for Best First... Read More →
JV

Julienne van Loon

RMIT
Julienne van Loon is the author of three novels, including The Australian/Vogel’s Award-winning Road Story. Her most recent book is Harmless (2013). She is a Vice Chancellor’s Senior Research Fellow with non/fictionLab at RMIT University, an Associate Editor at TEXT Journal, and a Director at the Australian Society of Authors.  Julienne is also a respected Creative Writing research-degree supervisor. Publications by her... Read More →
FM

Ffion Murphy

Senior Lecturer, Writing, Edith Cowan University
Ffion Murphy is a Senior Lecturer in Writing at Edith Cowan University. Her publications include edited books, chapters, articles and a novel, Devotion. She is currently investigating aspects of recuperative and exegetical writing. 
JS

Jessica Seymour

HU University of Applied Sciences
Dr Jessica Seymour is an Australian early-career researcher and lecturer at HU University of Applied Sciences, Utrecht. Her research interests include children’s and YA literature, transmedia storytelling, and popular culture. She has contributed chapters to several essay collections, which range in topic from fan studies, to Doctor Who, to ecocriticism in the works of JRR Tolkien. She is currently researching gender dynamics in the... Read More →


Wednesday November 30, 2016 10:00am - 11:00am
2A13 Building 2, UC

11:00am

Morning Tea :: 2B Foyer
Wednesday November 30, 2016 11:00am - 11:30am
2B: Foyer Building 2, UC

11:30am

Keynote and Farewell: Stealing Others' Lives: Constructing Aesthetic Biographies :: 2B9

Stealing Others' Lives: Constructing Aesthetic Biographies initially addresses a number of literary techniques and approaches in biographical method, and deals with the writing and reading of biography and autobiography. Language and the part it plays in biography is a focus, as is the 'problem' of aesthetics. In place of orthodox approaches, a version of biography as 'sociological history', based on the reflexive epistemology of the French social theorist Pierre Bourdieu, is presented. Empirical examples are taken from the fields of music and fine arts in contrasting this approach with conventional approaches. Both theoretical and practical issues are considered in this light, and how writing implicates the generative nature of subject-object relationships present in biographical co-construction is examined. Finally, parameters are suggested in terms of what we can, and cannot, know about 'others' lives' within cultural fields.



Moderators
SB

Scott Brook

Associate Professor, Writing, University of Canberra
Scott Brook is Associate Professor of Writing at the University of Canberra where he convenes and teaches 'Research and Practice' and 'Literature and Government'. He is also a member of the Centre for Creative and Cultural Research where he is working on two ARC Discovery Projects looking at creative vocations and creative arts graduates in Australia, China and the UK.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Grenfell

Michael Grenfell

Scholar
Michael Grenfell has worked at universities in England, Scotland and Ireland and held Chair positions within each. He has an extensive research background on the work of the French social theorist Pierre Bourdieu, and has applied this approach to such areas as economics, art, music, education, translation and literature. He has been a visiting scholar at the École des Hautes Études and the Collège de France, Paris. He is on... Read More →


Wednesday November 30, 2016 11:30am - 12:30pm
2B9: Lecture Theatre Building 2, UC
 
Thursday, December 1
 

10:00am

Creativity and the Twenty-first Century :: 2A12

In this two-part workshop, participants will consider a range of theoretical approaches to Creativity and their applications in practice from diverse perspectives, including philosophy, aesthetics, sociology and psychology. The aim is to explore the essential features of Creativity and how they play out procedurally from different points of view.
      In the morning session, participants will be introduced to the topic and will be presented with a synopsis of the different approaches. Suggested readings will be provided. However, we are asking participants to come with their own readings and experiences of Creativity with respect to their particular media. We are aiming to have as many practical examples as possible, please.
      In the afternoon session, Creativity will be presented within more of a social frame, in particular, that derived from the French social theorist, Pierre Bourdieu. A copy of Professor Michael Grenfell's translation of Bourdieu's seminar with fine art students in Nîmes will be provided for participants prior to the workshop. This debate sets creative endeavor within an analysis of the field of cultural reproduction, and the dynamics it contains. This field will be explored, as it exists in the twenty-first century, and the use of Bourdieu's tools both in understanding and operating within it. In particular, participants will be encouraged to consider 'Social' and 'objective art' as contrasting terms which might help us to better understand the way the creative impulse is instantiated in trans-historic and contemporary contexts. 


Speakers
avatar for Michael Grenfell

Michael Grenfell

Scholar
Michael Grenfell has worked at universities in England, Scotland and Ireland and held Chair positions within each. He has an extensive research background on the work of the French social theorist Pierre Bourdieu, and has applied this approach to such areas as economics, art, music, education, translation and literature. He has been a visiting scholar at the École des Hautes Études and the Collège de France, Paris. He is on... Read More →


Thursday December 1, 2016 10:00am - 4:00pm
2A12 Building 2, UC
  • More info This workshop is open to postgraduate students and early career academics (up till two years after finishing their postgraduate studies).